SCOTS
CMSW

Record of the David Woodburn Trial

Author(s): Anderson, Professor John

Text

Glasgow College
March 24th 1769



Present Dr Trail, the Dean, Dr Leechman, Mr Muirhead
Anderson, Clow, Reid

The Committee appointed by the University Meeting
of this Day's Date having met according to the
appointment of the University Meeting elected Doctor Trail Prases and
Mr Anderson Clerk. The Bedell is appointd to
summon Mr John Robison, Mr David Woodburn,
Mr Sinclair [¿] of Divinity, and Mr Hay to be
examined tomorrow at Twelve
o'clock by the Committee which is hereby [¿]
to meet at that hour in this Place.
R. Traill, Profse.
John Anderson


College Glasgow
March 25th 1769

[¿] Dr. Trail V. R. Dr. Leechman
Mr. Moorhead Mr. Anderson Dr Reid & Dr
Wilson.

The Committee adjourned till Monday next at 12 o'Clock.
R. Traill, Profse.
Coll. Glasg.
March 27th 1769


According to adjournment [¿] Dr.
Trail V. R., Dr Leechman Mr Muirhead
Mr Anderson.

Mr John Robison [¿] who being interrogated informed
the Committee That on St Patrick's Day in a Company of
several Irish and Scotch Gentlemen Mr Woodburn and He
were sitting next to each other. That Mr Woodburn being
asked for his Toast gave The Scarlet, or Scarlet he does
not recollect which. That Mr Robison thinking it an
indecent Toast and being surprized at Mr Woodburn's
giving it, asked him hastily What is your Toast?
Scarlet. What do you mean by that? The Whore of

Babylon perhaps. What is that again? The Military.
I don't understand you. Cunt, if you will have it.
Sir you are impertinent. That these words were
spoken with great [Rapidity]. That Mr Robison
used the word impertinent because he was displeased
with Mr Woodburn's Behaviour and intended
fr Mr Woodburn's Ear alone. That Mr
Robison did not think it was heard by the rest
of the Company. That none of them so far as
he observed took any Notice of it, till upon Mr
Robison's [¿] away Mr Woodburn told it
to Mr Long who [sate] next to him and proposed
following Mr Robison out, bu twas prevented

That the day folowing being Saturday in the
Evening Mr Robison was called out of the General
Society by Mr Woodburn, and found him walking
in the area of the Inner Court together with Mr
Long. That Mr Woodburn told Mr Robison
that he had used him Mr Woodburn very ill
the preceding Evening at the Tavern & insisted
that Mr Robison should explain his Conduct
and ask his Pardon. That Mr Robison
not recollecting all the Circumstances of what
paſsed, desired Mr Woodburn to inform him of
them in which case Mr Robison would tell him his
Sentiments. That Mr Woodburn complied
with his Desire, and Mr Robison recollected

the Circumstances as above related. That Mr
Robison then refused to ask Mr Woodburn's
Pardon teling him that his Words were the simple
Expreſsions of the Disgust he felt at Mr
Woodburn's Behaviour. That when Mr Robison
considered Mr Woodburn as a Perſon Employed
to superintend the Education of a young Gentleman
who was then in the Room he could
not help thinking his behaviour shamefully
improper. That when Mr Robison [¿]
that he himself was also a Tutor and
had a Pupil also in the Room, he thought
Mr Woodburn's behaviour impertinent
to him, and told him so. That Mr Woodburn
then complained that Mr Robison

had artfully fished out the Explanation of his
Toast with an Intention of exposing him to the
Company. That Mr Long upon this said that
it also appeared so to him. That Mr Robison
then insisted that He Mr Robison had no other
Intention but to check Mr Woodburn for his
Impertinence, and that this appeared plain
from this Circumstance that none of the
Company heard his Words. That Mr Woodburn
said that all the Company took notice of it, and that
therefore he must look upon Mr Robison as an
artfull Villain, and he would call him a Puppy
whenever he met him. That Mr Robison was
prevented from striking Mr Woodburn by thinking
that he would not make good his Threats

and by recollecting Mr Woodburn's Situation in
the University, and the [Prejudices] which remained
against him on account of ſome
formerly alleged Imprudencies. That Mr Robison
therefore told him that before he uſed
any further Freedoms with his Name something
else must happen. That Mr Woodburn
hastily said What must happen Sir? That Mr
Robison answered, that Mr Robison must
explain his own Conduct to the whole of the
Company. That soon after this Mr Robison
left Mr Woodburn & Mr Long, not thinking
tht there would be any thing more of it,
till he should meet with the Company. That
Mr Robison was informed by a Gentleman

that Evening that Mr Woodburn had called Mr
Robison a Coward & a Villain. That the same
Gentleman next Day told Mr Robison that
Mr Woodburn had informed him that the Evening
before, Mr Woodburn had told the Story
of that Night's Conversation, in a Company
met after Supper in a Gentleman's House
in Town. That Mr Robison was greatly
provoked by this unfair Proceeding, and
waited in the Area of the Cllege Court in hopes
of meeting with Mr Woodburn at twelve o'
Clock, in order to prevail upon him publickly
to retract his injurious Names.
That he did not meet with Mr Woodburn
who at this time was employed (as Mr Robi¬

ſon learnt from mr John Hay) in preparing
an Advertisement fot be circulated thro the
College, with the Intention of [reticuling] and
abusing Mr Robison's Character. That Mr.
Hay also informed Mr Robion that Mr Woodburn
gave him a copy of this advertisement. That the
copy was wrote in his presence in Mr. Woodburns
room by another person from an original in Mr.
Woodburn's hand. That Mr Hay also said that this
was the Copy now lodged in the hands of the
Committee. That Mr. Hay farther said that this
copy was given to him by Mr Woodburn and that
he was desired to read it at Mrs. Lindsays table. That
Mr Robison greatly provoked by this advertisment
came out on Monday morning and waited for Mr.
Woodburn at the dismiſsion of Dr Reid's Morning
Claſs intending to prevail upon Mr Woodburn to
ask his pardon by threatening to chastise him if he
refused. That Mr. Robison not finding Mr. Woodburn
went homewards in order to go to bed having been
extremely ill for some days that in his way he called

for Mr. Clawson and told him the disagreeable Situation
in which he stood. That Mr. Clawson appeared
equally concerned with himself and equally affraid
that the reſult of a publick quarrel would be
unfavourable for Mr. Woodburn. that Mr. Robison
upon this said that he would be very happy if any
other honourable method could be fallen upon in
order to terminated the affair and proposed to Mr.
Clawson still to referr to the decision of the
Company whether Mr Robison intended to expose
Mr. Woodburn. That Mr Robison then went home
to bed, and that by six o Clock in the evening the
want of sleep for three nights, a [confirmed] Cramp
in his stomach, and a [pinch] taken at three, had
rendered him so weak that he could scarcley
stand. That Mr. Robison was informed by Mr. Hay
that about twelve o Clock on that day Mr Woodburn had
enquired of him what was become of Mr. Robison
and being told that he was very ill in bed, said
that he wuld send him something in the afternon
which would touch him up. Mr Hay further, told
Mr. Robison that at five o Clock in the Evening on the same day Mr Woodburn had prevailed upon
him to addreſs and carry a letter to Mr. Robison but
that he did not know its contents but that upon

Mr. Woodburns aſsuring him that he would stand
between him and all danger he Mr Hay consented
to take it and dropt it in Mrs. Lindsays kitchen.
That Mr. Robison got it about half an hour after
six being then in bed, that this letter contained
an advertisement nearly the same with
that brought by Mr. Hay upon Sunday and which advertisement shall
be produced if called for. That Mr. Robison, provoked
to the utmost by this advantage taken of his confinement,
and forgetting his promise to Mr. Clawson,
got out of bed with an intention of coming down
streets in order to give Mr. Woodburn publick
chastisement. But in the the flurry of paſsion he
hastily threw the advertisement into the fire, but
immediately took it out again, a little scorched,
and carried it down street in his hand. That Mr.
Robison found Mr. Woodburn at the College gate
in company with some Gentlemen. That Mr. Robison
called Mr. Woodburn into the outer Area, and showing
him the remains of the advertisement asked him first
if he could read it Mr. Woodburn answered No
it is burned you see. Secondly if he could read any
part of it, and it was answered No thirdly if he was

the author of it answered No fourthly if he knew
the author of it nswered no. fifthy if he knew what
it meant answered that he knew nothing at all about
it. That by this time they were got into the middle
of the inner area. That Mr. Robison then taxed Mr.
Woodburn with his unfair proceedings in continuing
to give Mr. Robison injurious names notwithstanding
his repeated offeres of reference. That Mr. Robison then
insisted on his publickly retracting these names,
which being refused, Mr. Robison broke his stick
acroſs Mr. Woodburns head. That Mr. Bodburn
then retreated into the Roman Entry, and attempted
to strike Mr. Robison with his Cane. Mr. Robison
after having the first stroke thrown away the remains of his own stick
a scuffle then ensued, in which Mr. Mr. Woodburn
behaved very unfairly, That they were parted by
Mr. Cumin to whom Mr. Robison expreſsed his
sorrow for his publick indecency. That Mr. Robison,
thinking he had now retaliated the publick
affront, that he had received from Mr. Woodburn
by this publick chastisement, again offered to refer
the original dispute to the decision of the company
That Mr. Woodburn seemed at last to accept this

reference. That Mr. Robison then seeing Mr Rose
who had been toastmaster of the company spoke
to him desiring his company next morning at ten
o Clock. That Mr. Woodburn again repeated his
impertinence. That Mr. Robison now thought himself
acquitted from all obligations to a reference and
was provoked again to beat Mr. Woodburn, and a
second scuffle ensued. That this was terminated by
Mr. Rose and other gentlemen interposing and
calling off Mr. Robison telling him that he had given
Mr. Woodburn enough. That Mr. Robison immediately
gve over, telling Mr. Rose that he did so with
much greater pleasure than he began the fray.
That Mr. Robison owns himself guilty of great
impropriety, but hopes that his provocation will
be looked on as considerable, and can produce
evidence that his behaviour during the whole scuffle
was honourable, and showed his reluctance. That as
some points of the above declaration can be ascertained in
no other way but by the veracity of Mr. Robison or Mr.
Woodburn if Mr. Robison should afterwards have occasion
to advance any thing to Mr. Woodburns prejudice as a
man of veracity Mr Robison insists upon being believed

when he aſserts that this is not done with a design
to hurt Mr. Woodburn.

Mr. Robison being asked whether he received his
information of what had paſsed between Mr. Wodburn &
Mr. Hay from Mr. Hay's lips or how Mr. Robison got that
information. Declared that he heard the particulars
above related from Mr Hay's own mouth in presence of
several persons to be named if neceſsary. Being aſked
who these persons were. Declares Mr. Robert [Minter],
Mr. William M'Dowall, Mr. James Agnew, Mr.
Frederick M'Kenzie, Mr James Grant Mr. Robert
Sinclair, Mr. James M'Dowall and others One or more
of these persons being witneſses to each circumstance.
Being asked who was the gentleman who informed
you Mr. Robison that Mr. Woodburn had called you a
coward and a Villain. Declares That he will name
the gentleman if called upon to defend himself. Being
asked if he Mr. Robison knows whether Mr. Woodburn
gave him such names oftener than once and when and where.
Declares that he cannot give a poſsitive answer because
being confined to bed he had little opportunity of knowing
what paſsed. Being asked if he Mr. Robson was informed
before the scuffle that Mr. Woodburn had
spoken of Mr. Robison in the most disrespectful manner

in the company where Mr. Woodburn supped on
saturday night Declares that his answer is contained
in the above declaration. Being asked if it was a
numerous company and where. Declares that he does
not know whether the company was numerous on
saturday night after supper at Mr. John Moor's
surgeon not knowing of any person's being
present there but Mr. Moore himself Mr. Woodburn
and Mr. Dun. Being asked how he came to know that
he had been treated in an injurious manner in that company
by Mr. Woodburn. Declares that he had his information
from a gentleman to whom Mr. Woodburn
told it. And being asked who that Gentleman was.
Declared that he would tell his name if called upon
to defend himself. Being asked whether he knew that
Mr. Woodburn earnestly entreated Mr. Hay to conceal
or retract what
had paſsed betwixt them about addreſsing and conveying
of the letter to Mr. Robison. Declares that he declines
answering the question till called upon to address himself

and Mr. Robison declares upon the whole that he has
given the above narrative and answered the above questions
according to the best of his recollection Reserving
to himself full liberty of making such alterations or
additions as his memory may suggest to him.
John Anderson.
John Anderson [¿]

Thereafter it was moved that the Declarant should
be asked whether any other student or students of the
company besides Mr Woodburn had given indecent
Toasts or sung indecent songs Which question being
considered by the Committee the majority were of
opinion that this question will be put more properly
afterwards when the other party has given his declaration

They therefore order this question not to be put at
present but expreſsly declare that it may be put afterwards
together with all such as are agreeable to the
order of the University Meeting.

Dr. Trail desires it may be marked that he protested
against the judgement of the Committee in rejecting
the above question because this judgement in his
opinion tended to defeat the intention of the Committee
and for other reasons which he researves to himself the
liberty to lay before the University meeting if
he shall see cause.

This Committee is adjourned till tomorrow
at four o Clock afternoon.
John Anderson [¿]. R. Traill, præses.
Glasgow College
March 28th 1769

Present Dr. Trail præses, Dr. Leechman, Mr. Muirhead,
Mr. Anderson, and Dr. Reid.

The Committee being duely conviened according to their
last adjournment Mr. John Hay Student in the Logick Claſs
was sent for and [¿]. Mr. Hay being asked whether
on Saturday Sen-night or Sunday or Monday Sen-night Mr.
David Woodburn gave him a paper desiring him to show it

to different persons and to read it at Mrs Lindsay's table
Declares that he did. Being shown the paper signed by the
Vice-Rector and Clerk and given in my Mr. Muter and asked
whether that paper was the one that he received from Mr.
Woodburn declares in the affirmative. Being asked if
Mr. Woodburn wrote it or if he knows whose hand
writing it is Declares that it was wrote by Mr. Dun
Student of Divinity. Being asked if he knew what that
paper called an advertisement related to and if he was
to read it especially in the presence of Mr Robison
Declares that Mr. Woodburn told him that the paper related
to a Toast which Mr. Woodburn had given in a
publick Company and Declares that he was particularly
desired to read it when Mr. Robison was present.
Being asked if Mr. Woodburn desired him on some of
the three days above mentioned to direct a letter for
Mr. John Robison Declares in the affirmative and that
Mr. Woodburn gave this for a reason that his hand was
sore. Being asked if Mr. Woodburn desired him to convey
the said letter privately to Mr. Robison Declares that he
did. Being asked if Mr. Woodburn gave any reason for
this his desire Declares that he does not remember that
he did. Being asked if Mr. Woodburn desired him to
give this letter into Mr. Robison's own hand, to give it
to a boy or Porter, or if he gave any directions how he

wished to have it conveyed Declares that Mr. Woodburn
first spoke of giving it to a porter but that he afterwards
desired him to conceal that he was the carrier of the letter
and to conceal the person from whom he received it Declares
that on Monday night after the Scuffle between Mr. Robison
and Mr. Woodburn Mr. Woodburn saw Mr. Hay in the
Area and carried him up to his Mr. Woodburn's room
where he earnestly desired him to let it be known by no
means that he Mr. Woodburn had desired him to direct
and carry the above letter. Being asked if Mr. Woodburn
made use of this expreſsion I would rather give you Hay
all that ever I was worth in the world than that
you should tell it Declares that he does not remember the
expreſsion,. Being asked if he Mr. Hay asked Mr. Woodburn
why he was so anxious to keep it secret Declares that
he does not remember that he did. Being asked if Mr.
Woodburn any time afterwards talked to him about the same
letter Declares that he did on the Tuesday following. Being
asked if Mr. Woodburn on that occasion desired him to
retract or [¿] what he had owned to Mr. Muter on the day preceding
Declares that he did. Being asked if Mr. Woodburn gave
any reason for desiring Mr. Hay to [¿] what he had

said on the day preceding Declares that Mr. Woodburn
gave this for a reason that if Mr. Hay would not [¿] it
would hurt him to wit Mr. Woodburn. Being asked whether
Mr. Woodburn on Sunday when he gave the advertisement
above mentioned to the Declarant that he used these words or
words to this purpose that he had by him an explication
of a certain Toast which he thought every one of his friends
should have a copy of Declares that he did and that thereupon
Mr. Dun wrote the copy given in by Mr. Muter in
the Declarants presence
John Hay
John Anderson [¿]

The præses having withdrawn without any intimation
Dr. Leechman was appointed to sign this minute. This
Committee is adjourned till tomorrow at twelve O'Clock
when Mr. Woodburn Mr. Dun and Mr. Long are appointed
to be summoned by the Bedell
Will: Leechman
John Anderson [¿]
Glasgow College
March 29th 1769


present Dr. Leechman, Mr. Muirhead, Mr. Anderson
Dr. Trail præses, Dr. Wilson and Dr. Reid

The Committee being duely conveened according to their
last adjournment Mr. Woodburn [¿] and being
informed that the Profeſsors had heard that he had been
engaged in a Riot in the College and being asked whether

he chose to give a narration of what led to that Riot as
Mr. Robison had done Or whether he chose to answer such
questions as should be put to him by the Committee Declared
that he was willing to give an account of that whole affair
provided the Committee would be so good as to let him know
whether he was called as an evidence or as a party. Upon
this the Committee unanimously informed Mr. Woodburn
that they were only impowered to take a precognition into
the affair of Mr. Woodburn and into all other affairs
connected with it as mentioned in the resolution of the
University Meeting and that therefore if he did not
Chuse to give a narration in the same manner that Mr.
Robison had done They would put questions to him to
which he might make Replies. To which Mr. Woodburn
answered that he thought it was highly improper for
him to give any narration or answer any questions
to this Committee till he knew upon what footing he
was called. Upon this reply of Mr. Woodburn's the
Committee ordered the minutes of this sederunt to be
read over to Mr. Woodburn and desired to know
whether he still continued to be of the same mind, that
is to say, whether he declined to give a narration and to
answer questions except upon the condition above specified.
To which Mr. Woodburn replied that he was
of the same mind. John Anderson [¿]


Mr. Dun Student of Divinity being called [¿] and being
asked if on Saturday Sen-night or on the day following
he had in Mr. Woodburns room copied a paper called
an advertisement in which Scarlet is mentioned
Declared in the negative. Being asked if he
ever saw a paper in Mr Woodburns room in which
the word Scarlet was written and an explication of
it as a Toast, since the seventeenth day of the present
month. Declares in the affirmative. Being asked
if he knows what that paper related to Declares that
as is hinted in the immediately precedeing interrogation
he understood it as some kind of an explication of the
word Scarlet when used as a Toast. Being
asked if he know's when that toast was given, in what
company, and to what person or persons the paper related,
Declares first that as to that he can say nothing
directly Secondly neither knows he any thing certainly
of what Company or Companies it may have been given in
thirdly Declares that he finds it impoſsible to answer
that part of the question. Being shewn the paper an
advertisement signed by the Vice-Rector and Clerk
and being asked if he had ever seen it before. Declares
that he had. Being asked when and where Declares
in Mr. Woodburns room He thinks on Sunday Sen-night
Being asked if he knows whose hand writing it is Declares
that it is his own or at least the greater part. Being

asked who wrote the other part Declares that it was
Mr. John Hay Being asked if he Mr. Dun wrote that
paper by the direction of another or if he copied it
Declares that he did write it partly in the one way
partly in the other Being asked who directed him
to write it that is to say if any person dictated the
words of the above mentioned paper from another paper
Declares that Mr. John McKinnon student in the
magistrand Claſs read part of it off a another paper
while the Declarant wrote it after. Being asked if
he himself knew or if any person in the room at that
time informed him what that paper related to and
what the intention was of writing it. Declares that before
that time he had heard it reported that a number of College
Gentlemen had been dining somewhere down the street
and that these gentlemen being some of them as he heard
pretty merry they had been he supposes insensibly led
into the humour of giving ludicrous and some of them
even of bawdy toasts. Likewise that he had been informed
that Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn were both in the same
company and that when these foolish toasts were coming
about Mr. Woodburn chused to evade them by giving the
Word Scarlet which Mr. Robison not relishing some
impertinencies ensued Further Declares that no body in the
room told him to what particular circumstance that paper
which is mentioned above immediately referred further

Declares that as nobody explained the intention of that
paper to him He did not then or since conceive or understand
that it either had or could bear any particular intention
whatever. Being asked if he wrote that paper for his own
use or for the use of any other person Declares that he
wrote it as he supposes for the use of Mr. John Hay and
at his particular request. Being asked if he heard Mr.
Woodburn say any thing to Mr. Hay concerning it Declares
that he remembers nothing in particular Being asked if he
heard Mr. Woodburn desire Mr. Hay to read it in the
presence of Mrs. Lindsay's family Declares that as he has
already declared he does not recollect that Mr. Woodburn
spoke these words to Mr. Hay but that they were speaking
something together Being asked if he overheard any part
of the conversation between Mr. Hay and Mr. Woodburn and
if he did what it was Declares in the first place that he
did overhear and understand some part of their conversation
and in the second place he Declares that he
heard Mr. Woodburn ask Mr. Hay how Mr. Robison was
that morning but that he does not
recollect Mr. Hays answer Being asked if he heard
Mr. Woodburn giving any directions to Mr. Hay about the
manner or the persons to whom he ought to be read that paper
Declares that he does not recollect Mr. Woodburns having
given Mr. Hay any instructions about his manner of using that
paper only that he thinks Mr. Woodburn said to Mr. Hay

will you read it. Being asked if he was present when
Mr. Hay directed a letter to Mr. John Robison Declares that
he was not. Being asked if he Mr. Dun knows that the
above paper or advertisement was meant as a satyr
against Mr. Robison Declares that he did not think
that the above mentioned paper either intended or could
intend satyrical reflections against any individual
at that time Being asked what he took to be the intention
of the words Coxcomb, pale, and other descriptive things
of the same nature in the same paper whether they were
descriptive of the whole company in which the toast was
given or of any individual Declares that he does not know
whether the phrases mentioned were descriptive of the
whole company or of any individual in it.

The Committee with the consent of Mr. Dun agreed
to adjourn to three O Clock that his Declaration should then
be read to him and signed.

At three O Clock the Committee mett and Mr. Dun
[¿]and the Clerk having begun to read the foresaid
Declaration to Mr. Dun he Mr. Dun desired an alteration
or erasement of some things contained in it Upon which
some members of the Committee being of opinion that the
Declaration already wrote down ought not to be erased or
altered But that Mr. Dun had a right to dictate to the Clerk

any addition correction explication or alteration which
he desired to be subjoined and others being of opinion
that, that was unneceſsary but that the Declarant might
blot out or cause blot out any words that he pleased or
especially in a precognition which serves only to direct
the Court in framing their accusation. The majority being
of the first opinion Mr. Dun thereupon Declared that being
in a bad state of health he had not time to make such
additional alterations or corrections as were neceſsary
and that he did not chuse to sign his declaration as it stood
and thereupon withdrew.

Mr Anderson as Clerk desires it to be marked that this
minute book has no margin and the lines are so close that
if the corrections were any thing more than the change of single
words objections might be made to the minutes as very indistinct.


Thereafter Mr. Long being called before this Committee
[¿] and being asked whether he was present with Mr.
Woodburn on Saturday Sen-night when he called Mr. Robison
out of the general society and if he remembers what paſsed
between them Declares that he was and that when Mr.
Robison came to Mr. Woodburn Mr. Woodburn said to him
Mr. Robison that he was sorry to put him to so much trouble
but that he was under a sort of neceſsity of asking him what
he meant by calling him impertinent in Mr

McDonalds Mr. Robison desired Mr. Woodburn to relate
the whole circumstances of the story and he would give him
his opinion of it distinctly Mr. Woodburn related the
matter how he gave the Toast. Mr. Robison then replied
that he was still of the same opinion that he was impertinent
Mr. Woodburn alledged that Mr Robison wanted
to fish out the meaning of the toast and to expose him
upon which Mr. Robison answered that he did and
that he was very sorry that a man of Mr. Woodburn's character was amy
way connected with Mr Wilson as he was a fine young
man. Mr. Woodburn answered that I must be under the
neceſsity of calling you a Coxcomb and a puppy Mr.
Robison replied that his character was too well established
to suffer any thing from him Being further asked if he remembers
any thing that Mr. Woodburn said to Mr. Robison
when desired by Mr. Robison to give an account of what
paſsed between them at M'Donald's Declares that Mr.
Woodburn told me Mr. Robison the toast he gave was Scarlet
that Mr. Robison enquired the meaning of the toast and was
answered it might mean the Military, the whore of Babylon
or Cunt upon which Mr. Robison told him that he was very
impertinent and further declared that Mr. Woodburn asked Mr. Robison
why he did not find fault with some other toasts that
were given before his and alledged that he had a particular
design of fishing out the meaning of his toast in order to
expose him Mr. Robison answered he had.
John Long.


This Committee adjourn their meeting till friday
the thirty first Current at twelve O Clock
R, Traill, præses.
Glasgow College
March 31st 1769

Present Dr. Trail præses, Mr. Muirhead Mr. Anderson
Dr. Reid & Dr. Leechman

The Committee being duely conveened according to
their adjournment and Mr. McKinnon being called [¿]
and being asked if he was present in Mr. Woodburns room
on Sunday Sen-night about the middle of the day together
with Mr. Hay and Mr. Dun Declares in the affirmative
Being asked if he dictated from a paper to Mr. Hay
in which paper Scarlet was mentioned Declares in the
negative. Being asked if he saw Mr. Hay write any
such paper Declares that he heard Mr. Hay begging of
Mr. Dun to write it for him which Mr. Dun at first
refused but when he saw Mr. Hay writing so slow he
then wrote it for him after Mr. Hay had a second time
requested of him to do so. Being asked if any person
dictated to Mr Hay or Mr. Dun, if they copied from
another paper, or if what they wrote was their own
composition Declares that he Mr. M'Kinnon read it off
one paper while Mr. Dun wrote it upon another.


Being asked who gave him the paper from which he
dictated to Mr. Dun, Declares that he found the paper
lying upon the table and took it up at the desire either
of Mr. Hay or Mr. Dun but is not poſsitively sure which
of them Being asked if he knew the hand writing Declares
that at that time he did not take so much notice of it
as to condescend upon its being any particular ones hand
writing. Being asked if he knew the purport of that
paper or what it related to Declares that no person
told him the purport of that paper but that he then
conjectured it to be the explanation of a Toast.
Being asked what led him to dictate that paper to
Mr. Dun and Mr. Hay Declares that he did so at the
request of one or other of these gentlemn purely for
dispatch sake. Being asked if he heard Mr. Woodburn
say any thing to Mr. Hay about that paper or its contents.
Declares in the negative for Mr. Woodburn
had gone out of the room immediately upon their coming
into it and as far as he can recollect did not return
till Mr. Hay had gone away. Being asked if he heard
Mr. Woodburn upon his return say any thing to Mr.
Dun about that paper or its contents or about Mr. Hay
Declares that he heard Mr. Dun observing that it was
a curious or uncommon kind of advertisement and

that was all that had paſsed about it then the conversation
after that turning upon some other subject. Being asked if he had
any conversation upon the same subject with Mr.
Woodburn or Mr. Dun that afternoon or next day Declares
in the negative Being asked if he saw Mr. Hay direct
a letter to Mr. John Robison Declares in the negative
Being asked if on the Sunday when he was in Mr.
Woodburns room he heard Mr. Dun or Mr. Hay intimate
by their conversation to what person or thing
the paper related and particularly the words Scarlet
Coxcomb pale and Henpecking a Tutor. Declares that
he did not. Only he heard Mr. Hay say that he would
read it at Mrs. Lindsays table to which Mr. Dun
replied you may do in that as you think proper.
Being asked what were his Mr. McKinnons thoughts
concerning that paper for it was singular and Mr. Hay
had said he was to read it at a publick table Declares that
he thought it the explanation of a Toast but that both
the Toast and the explanation appeared to him equally
mysterious. Being asked what was the first explanation
of that paper or Toast to which it referred which he got
and if he remembers by whom Declares that he asked
Mr. Woodburn the meaning of the word Scarlet where
given as a toast to which he Mr. Woodburn replied that
it had no meaning at all but only a mere expletive

Being asked if he did not know the hand writing of
the advertisement at that time or if he has since learned
who's it was Declares in the Negative Being asked whether
on the Sunday before mentioned he was in Mr. Woodburns
room during the whole time that Mr. Hay staid there
Declares that as far as he can recollect he was in the
room after Mr. Hay had gone away and that he thinks
he came in about the same time with Mr. Hay Being
asked Whether he heard Mr. Woodburn use these words
to Mr. Hay to wit I have got by me an explication of
a certain Toast for the use of my friends of which you
may have a copy or words to that purpose Declares
that he does not recollect any such speech of Mr.
Woodburns directed to Mr. Hay or to any other person
that was present Being asked what gave occasion
to Mr Hay to ask a copy of the advertisement before
mentioned Declares that when they went into the room
the advertisement was lying upon the table some one
or other of them took it up and read it upon which Mr.
Hay immediately cryed out I must have a copy of that
advertisement but does not recollect which of the four read
it first. Being asked Whether he remembered the quotation
from Malebranche to beware of the man who blackens
over his glaſs and turls pale in his paſsion and

whether he thought that descriptive of Mr.
Robison or any other person Declares that he thinks
the paper now showed him signed by the Vice Rector and
Clerk comtains the quotation but that he did not think
it descriptive of Mr. Robison as he did not know
whether that gentleman or not turned pale over his
glaſs as he had never been in Company with him
Being asked whether or not he thought the author of that paper
meant to describe Mr. Robison Declares that he
did not know the authors intention or whom he meant
John McKinnon
Nihil deest
John Anderson Cher. Comm.


Mr. William Dun Student of Divinity being called
compeared and his former Declaration being read to him
he desired the following alterations and corrections might
be made therein primo in page twenty second line fifth
instead of Declared in the negative read Declared in the
affirmative Secundo page twenty fourth line third
and fourth - Understand that it either had or could hear
and particular intention whatever - after the word
intention add - so as to be applicable to any particular
person or persons in particular occasion. Mr. Dun then
Declared he had no other corrections to make. And
Being asked whether Mr. Woodburn ever told him
that, that paper related to Mr. Robison Declares
that Mr. Woodburn never did Being asked if he knows
who made the paper from which Mr McKinnon dictated
to Mr. Dun Declares that he does not certainly
know who wrote it Being asked if he knows who
laid it upon the table Declares in the negative Being
asked whether he heard Mr. Woodburn desire Mr. Hay
to read the paper in presence of Mrs. Lindsays family or
whether he heard him say any thing to that purpose or
to that effect Declares in the negative. Mr. Dun subscribes
this Declaration and his former in pages twenty second twenty
third twenty fourth and twenty fifth with the above correctiosn
and aditions as his Declaration.
William Dun
John Anderson [¿]


This Committee is adjourned till twelve O clock on
Tuesday next
Glasgow College
April 4th 1769
Present Mr Anderson, Dr Leechman, Dr Trail præses, and Dr Reid

The Committee duly convened, according to their Adjournment,
and Mr Rose of the Magistrant Claſs, having appeared, and
being asked if he heard Mr Woodburn give for his Toast upon
St Patrick's Night the Scarlet or Scarlet and if he overheard any
Words that paſsed between Mr Woodburn & Mr Robison
in consequence of that Toast, Declares that he heard
the Toast given, but does not recollect any Words that paſsed
between these two Gentlemen. Being asked if he saw
a Scuffle in the College Court, between Mr. Robison and
Mr. Woodburn upon the Monday after St. Patricks day
Declares that he is not poſsitive as to the day but in a
few days after St. Patricks day he saw a scuffle in the
College Court between Meſsrs. Robison and Woodburn.
That the first sight which he got of them was in the
entry to the Roman paſsage that Mr. Robison was

pushing the other into the paſsage that Mr. Robison at that
time had no stick in his hand that the other had a Cane
and was endeavouring to make a stroke with it at Mr.
Robison when he met Mr. Rose snatched it out of his hand.
That after some struggles they were parted and Mr. Robison
said since I have condescended to put myself on a level
with you, I am satisfied to leave the decision of our dispute
to the Company that were present that night
that upon this Mr. Woodburn said he would look upon himself
as injured if he was thought to be upon a level with Mr.
Robison, upon which Mr. Robison struck him with his
fist, and they fought for some time; that upon his Mr.
Rose's desiring Mr. Robison to desist, he left off, and
said he was as willing to desist as he was to
have begun. Being asked which of the two appeared
to him to have the advantage in the scuffle Declares
that Mr. Robison seemed to be superiour; Being asked
if at the giving of the Toast words might have ensued
between Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn without his Mr.
Rose's having heard them or having given attention to
them Declares that they might have paſsed without his
having heard them or having given attention to them
John Roſe


Thereafter Mr. Sinclair Student of Divinity being called
Compeared And being asked if he heard Mr. Woodburn
on St. Patricks night give the Toast Scarlet and if he
overheard any words that paſsed between Mr Robison
and Mr. Woodburn in consequence of that Toast Declared
that he heard neither the one nor the other: That he saw
Mr. Woodburn leave his chair which was next to Mr.
Robisons and go to the other side of the table that he
knew nothing of any difference between them till next
day that Mr. Robison mentioned it
Robert Sinclair

This Committee is adjourned till twelve O Clock on
thursday next
R. Traill, præses.
Glasgow College
April 6th 1769
Present Dr. Trail Dr. Leechman Mr. Anderson Dr. Reid &
Mr. Muirhead

The Committee being duely conveened according to
their last adjournment and Mr. Hill Wilson Student
in the Ethick Claſs being Called Compeared and
being asked if the word Scarlet was given for a toast on St
Patricks night by Mr. Woodburn Declares in the
affirmative.


Being asked if he heard any words between Mr. Robison
and Mr. Woodburn in consequence of that toast Declares
that he did not pay any attention to what was paſsing at that
time between them. Being asked whether he heard any
conversation in the Company after Mr. Robison was gone
upon words that paſsed between Mr Woodburn and him
Declares That he heard some conversation of that kind
but that as it was late and he was indisposed to attend
to it he could not repeat it. Being asked if he recollects
what persons were next to Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn
at the time the Toast was given Declares that as he
remembers Mr. Pitt was next to Mr. Robison or very near
him and that he himself was next to Mr. Pitt but that
there might not be some empty chairs between them as there
were several of the company gone _ Being asked if
he came out of the Tavern with Mr. Blackwood on St. Patricks
night and what he knows of the knocking down of a man
soon after Declares that he left the Tavern along with
three others To wit Mr. Blackwood Mr. Thomas Dunlop
and Mr. Kennedy, that he thinks Mr Dunlop and
Mr. Blackwood were foremost and that Mr. Kennedy and
him were at a little distance from them, That he
saw no poaker in Mr. Blackwoods hand when they came

out of the Tavern That he thinks he saw the man struck
but does not know by whom That he saw the man lying on
the ground, that a little after he saw Mr. Blackwod with
a little iron poaker in his hand - Being asked if on the
Saturday or Sunday after St. Patricks day he saw Mr.
Hay have the advertisement in his hand which is signed
by the Vice-Rector and Clerk Declares that on Sunday
after St. Patricks he did and Declares that Mr. Hay
did not inform him from whom he got it, that he Mr.
Wilson upon reading it easily saw that it related to the
toast given by Mr. Woodburn on St Patricks night.
Hill Wilson

Mr. Angew Student in the Ethic Claſs compeared and being
asked declared that he was not in McDonalds between
eight and nine o Clock upon St Patricks night during
which time Scarlet was given as a Toast by Mr.
Woodburn as he was afterwards told, That he came into
the Company about nine O Clock and staid till about
ten That Mr. Robison was gone before he came in, that
during his stay he heard no conversation about words
that should have paſsed between Mr. Robison and Mr.
Woodburn and that he heard nothing of the matter
till next day that he heard it from different hands. Being
shown the Advertisement signed by the Vice-Rector and

Clerk and asked what he knows concerning it Declares
that he thinks he saw it or a copy of it in Mr. Wilsons hand,
that Mr. Wilson did not tell him what it related to but from
the words in it and from what he had heard of it he
supposed it related to a Toast which had been given on
St Patricks night. Declares that he knew nothing of the
letter sent to Mr. Robison till after the Scuffle in the College
Court.
James Agnew

Mr. Thomas Dunlop Student of Law being called
Compeared and being asked if he was present when Scarlet
was given as a Toast in McDonalds on St. Patricks night
Declares that he was not he having left the company for some
time. Being asked if upon his return to the Company
he heard any conversation concerning words which should
have paſsed between mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn in
consequence of the above mentioned toast Declares that he
heard Mr. Hill Wilson Mr. Kennedy and Mr. John Long and others talking
of it whose names
he cannot recollect. Declares that he thinks the above
mentioned gentlemen said that they thought Mr. Robison
was very much in the wrong and that Mr. Woodburn would
be a Ninny if he did not resent it Being asked if he

remembers who said these words or words to that purpose
Declares that he thinks it was the voice of the whole
Company. Being asked if he recollects what the actions
or words were for which the whole company blamed Mr.
Robison Declares that it was because Mr. Robison had
said to Mr. Woodburn that he was damned impertinent
for having given a Certain Toast. Being asked if he remembers
whether any of the Company mentioned what the
Toast was and what it was that happened between Mr.
Robison and Mr. Woodburn after the Toast was given
Declares that the Toast was the Scarlet, that Mr. Robison
asked an explanation of it, that Mr. Woodburn said
that it might mean the Military or the whore of Babylon
that Mr. Robison said he did not understand any of these
explanations, that Mr. Woodburn then said he might mean
Cunt by it if he pleased, that Mr. Robison upon that said Mr.
Woodburn was damned impertinent. Being asked if
Mr. Woodburn was present when this conversation
paſsed Declares that he was not. Being asked if he
heard any of the Company say that Mr. Robison had
spoke with but a low voice Declares that he did not
Being asked if he heard any of them say that Mr. Robison
had given it as a reason for saying that Mr. Woodburn was
impertinent that one or both of their pupils were in the

Company Declares that he did not.
Thos. Dunlop

This Committee is adjourned till a quarter past three this
afternoon
R. Traill, præses

Present Mr. Anderson, Dr. Leechman Dr. Trail Dr. Reid
and Mr. Croſse

The Committee being duely conveened according to their
last adjournment Mr. Dunlop was again called, and being
asked what he knows concerning a man who was knocked down on St Patricks
night Declares that he came out of the Tavern along with
Mr. Blackwood Mr. Hill Wilson and Mr. Kenned Being
asked if he Mr. Dunlop and Mr. Blackwood were before
the other two Declares that Mr. Wilson and he were foremost.
Being asked if he saw Mr. Blackwood bring a
poaker with him out of the tarvern Declares that he
did not see a poaker untill it was in the Provosts hand
after the man had been knocked down Being asked if he
saw the man receive the stroke Declares that he did
not Being asked if Mr. Blackwood was behind him or
before him after he left the Tavern Declares that he was

behind him Being asked what it was that mde him
turn back to Mr. Blackwood Declares that it was the
hearing of a Scuffle behind him, and that when he turned
back he saw Mr. Blackwood near a man and a boy as he
thinks and that there was a confused scuffle the particulars
of which he does not remember Declares that the man and
the boy that is the two persons referred to above went down
the street as he believes Declares
that the person above called a boy mght have been a man
for any thing that he knows it being a dark night Declares that he himself
Mr. Blackwood Mr. Wilson and Mr. Kennedy came up the
street and was soon after joined by the Provost Being
asked if he had seen the advertisement signed by the Vice
Rector and Clerk Declares that he had not till after the
Scuffle that had happened between Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn
and that he knew nothing of the letter directed to Mr. Robison
which was dropt in Mrs. Lindsay's home till after the said
scuffle
Thos. Dunlop

Mr. Lang being called Compeared and being asked
what he heard the Company say on St. Patricks night
with respect to what had paſsed between Mr. Robison and
Mr. Woodburn as to a Toast Declares that he heard the
company say Mr. Robison had behaved ill and that Mr.
Woodburn was wrong or a blockhead if he did not take
notice of it. Being asked if he was present on St. Patrick's

night when the Scarlet was given for a toast Declares
that he was not but that he came in after Mr. Robison
was gone and that the Company to wit Mr. Wilson Mr. Angew
Mr. Kennedy Mr. Pollock Mr. Dunlop Mr. Johnston and others
conversed about what had paſsed between Mr. Robison
and Mr. Woodburn ad that Mr. Wilson particularly said
that Mr. Woodburn was ill used Being asked whether the
opinion given by the Company of Mr. Robison's ill treatment
of Mr. Woodburn was in consequence of some of themselves
having told the company what had paſsed or in consequence of
a representation made to the company by Mr. Woodburn
Declares that he cannot tell
John Lang

This Committee is adjurned till to morrow at
twelve o clock and as Dr. Trail is not present Dr.
Leechman is appointed to sign the Minutes
Will: Leechman
John Anderson [¿]
Glasgow College
April 7th 1769
Present Dr. Trail Mr. Anderson & Dr. Reid


The Committee being duely conveened according to their last
adjournment and Mr. George Pitt Student of History being
called Compeared and being asked declared that he was sitting
upon Mr. Robisons right hand when Mr. Woodburn
gave the Scarlet for his toast upon St. Patrick's night, that he
thinks there was an interval of two or three chairs between
Meſsrs Robison and Woodburn at the time the toast was given,
that soon after it was given he observed them talk a little
but did not know what they said and that he observed no
signs of paſsion in either of their faces or motions that he
the Declarant went to sup in another place about nine O Clock
and knows nothing of what happened afterwards but by report,
that before he went away he does not recollect that any of
the Company mentioned any thing that had paſsed between
Meſsrs. Robison and Woodburn nor did he know of any
difference that should have happened between them till the
day following.
George Pitt.

Mr. George Kennedy Student in the Physick Claſs being
called compeared and being asked declared that he was
present on St. Patricks night when Mr. Woodburn gave
the Scarlet for his toast, that he the Declarant was on Mr.
Robisons right hand at the very time the toast was given that
he remembers Mr. Robison asked an explanation of it, that

he heard Mr. Woodburn say in return the Military but that
he does not recollect any other words that paſsed between
them being at that time talking to Mr. Thornton. Being
asked if he thinks Mr.Robison spoke with a loud or a low voice
Declares that he believes it was with a low voice. Being
asked Declares that long after Mr. Robison
was gone he recollects that he heard Mr. Woodburn say that he had
been ill used and that he Mr. Woodburn soon afterwards
left the company, that in consequence of this some of the company
talked of what had paſsed betwen Meſsrs, Robison and Woodburn,
and said that Mr. Woodburn had been ill used and ought
to resent it that he does not recollect that any of them mentioned
what the ill usage was that among those present when this
conversation paſsed he thinks there were Mr. Wilson Mr.
Dunlop Mr. Johnston and Mr Long and perhaps Mr. Thornton
Being asked Declares that he left the Tavern in company with
Meſsrs. Blackwood Dunlop and Wilson, that he saw no poaker in
Mr. Blackwoods hand and heard him speak nothing about it,
that in going towards the College he the Declarant and Mr. Wilſon
had hold of each others arms, that Mr. Blackwood and Mr. Dunlop
were before them but whether they were close together or not
he does not recollect That he recollects there was a noise like
that of women calling from the windows and that he heard like
the breaking of glaſs windows but that he saw no person knocked

down, that he recollects nothing of what paſsed
afterwards but his standing in the street with Meſsrs. Wilſon
and Dunlop near the Grammer School-wynd and that he afterwards
went with Mr. Blackwood into the Principal's yard
that they were taken in the Principal's yeard by Soldiers
and the Provost, that he the Declarant neither saw
the poaker nor heard of it till after the Provost was gone
that Mr. Blackwood told the Declarant that the Provost had
taken the poaker out of Mr. Blackwoods hand
George Kennedy

Mr. Thomas Thornton Student of Mathematicks being
called Declared that he was on the opposite side of the
table to Mr. Woodburn when Mr. Woodburn gave Scarlet
for his toast, that he heard some words paſs between Mr.
Robison and Mr. Woodburn in consequence of that toast as he
apprehends and some minutes after the toast was given, but
what the words were he does not know. Being asked if he
was not directly opposite to Mr. Woodburn Declares that
he was Being asked if Mr. Robison spoke with a loud or
a low voice Declares that he is not certain. Being asked
Declares that some time after Mr. Robison was gone as well
as most of the Company he heard some of the Compay he
thnks Mr. Lang say that he was sorry to hear that Mr.
Woodburn had been ill used by Mr. Robison that the Declarant

did not hear any of the company mention any particulars of
the ill usage which Mr. Woodburn was said to have received
nor does he recollect that he heard it till some days after
Thos. Thornton

Mr. James Rogers Student of Law being called compeared
and Declared that he had left the Company before Scarlet was
given as a Toast by Mr. Woodburn and did not return
that night
James Rogers

Mr. Joseph Pollock Student in the Magistrand Claſs being
called compeared and being asked Declared that he was in the
Company on St Patricks night when Mr. Woodburn gave the
Scarlet for his Toast, that he the Declarant was within a chair
or two of Mr Robison, that he heard some words paſs beetween
Meſsrs. Robison and Woodburn but was not certain what they
were only that he thinks they were in consequence of the Toast.
being asked whether Mr. Robison spoke with a loud or a low
voice and whether he saw any signs of anger between Mr.
Woodburn and him Declares that he thinks Mr. Robison spoke
in his common way and that he saw no signs of anger
between them, that he left the Company about nine O Clock
after Mr. Robison had left it and that before he went he heard
no conversation among any of the company concerning the bad
usage which Mr. Woodburn had received nor does he recollect

any thing of what had paſsed between till the night that
they had the Scuffle in the College Court
Joseph Pollock
This Committee is adjourned till three O Clock afternoon
R. Traill, præses
John Anderson [¿]

Past three O Clock afternoon. The Committee being
duely conveened To wit Mr. Anderson Dr. Leechman
Dr. Trail

Mr. Philip Johnston student in the Ethick Claſs
being called compeared and being asked Declared that
he was in McDonald's on St Patricks day at Dinner, that
he was not in the Company when Mr. Woodburn gave
Scarlet for his Toast, that when he returned Mr. Robison
was gone and Mr. Woodburn likewise, that he heard the
Company talking of ill usage which the said Mr. Woodburn
had received That
he was told that Mr. Robison had used Mr. Woodburn
ill that he Declarant is not
sure they told him the particulars of the ill usage at that time

but that he is sure they said Mr. Woodburn was to blame if he
did not take notice of it, that at this time the Company were
mostly gone but that he remembers the following gentlemen
were present Mr. Hill Wilson, Mr. Dunlop Mr. Kennedy
and Mr Long, That he does not know who introduced the
subject for they were talking of it when he came into the room
Philip Johnson

This Committee is adjourned till twelve O Clock on
Monday next
R. Traill, præses
John Anderson [¿]
Glasgow College
April 10th 1769

Present Mr. Anderson, Dr. Leechman, Mr. Muirhead, Dr.
Trail

The Committee being duely Conveened according to their
last adjournment John Gillies Master of Arts was Called
and appeared and being asked Declared that upon
St. Patricks night and the day following he heard
the noise of some persons behaving in a tumultuous manner
That on opening the window he observed them advancing
up streets they appeared to him to go beyond the College.
Upon a Call from some person before his windows opposite

to the Black-Friars steps they returned and one of them
who appeared to be one of the tallest of the company
attacked a man standing or walking slowly
a little below the grammer school wynd
he beat violently with hands and feet and
though some of his companions called to him to come
along with them still continued so long that the Declarant
intended to go down but on a call from a woman living
in the house immediately above the Black Friar steps the
person who was beating the man left him and with the
rest of the Company fell to pulling down a sign immediately
below the window from which the Woman had called to them.
What happened after he the Declarant could not observe
as the moon began to be clouded but they were soon after
diſsipated by the guard. That the Declarant betwixt the
time that the tall gentleman had left over beating the man
and their going down streets spoke with Mr. Blackwood
and desired him to come up to his room and asked who
had beat the man but from what Mr. Blackwood said
could gather nothing but that Mr. Blackwood was
mortally drunk. Being asked if he the Declarant thinks
that the tall person above described as beating the man
with his hands and feet was Mr. Blackwood or who
he thinks he was Declares that he is sure he could
not be Mr. Blackwood that at that time he took him for
a person whom he afterwards found not to have been

of the Company. Being asked who that person was Declares
he does not chuse to mention his name as he is sure he
was not in the Company. Being asked how he is sure that
he was not in the Company Declares that from the testimony
of all who were of the company, and likewise from seeing
that person himself next day or the day after and considering
his person he did not appear to him to be so tall
as the person whom he saw beating the man Being asked
if he saw Mr. Blackwood have any thing in his hand Declares
that he had nothing in his hand.
John Gillies.

The Clerk delivered to the Committee the Examination of
the Lord Provost which they ordered to be engroſsed in
the minutes.

Any two of the Committee are appointed to examine the
sick man this afternoon or tomorrow forenoon and any other
persons who were along with the sick man

The Committee agree to report to the University
meeting to be held to morrow at three O Clock
R. Traill, præses

At the Coffeehouse Apr. 8th. 1769 The Committee of the
University Meeting appointed to meet with my Lord Provost
of Glasgow and to receive what information his Lordship
can give of the Riot said to be committed in the street by

Mr. Blackwood upon the night after the 17th of March having
met with his Lordship and desired him that he would
be pleased to give an Information as far as he knew of
the circumstances of the Riot above mentioend to be laid
before the University Meeting. He Declared
That he had information of a Riot in the street and came
out about one O Clock, on the night between the 17th and
18th of March That he heard a great noise, of cursing
wearing and breaking of Windows, near the black friar
steps, That his Lordship found a number of people and
Mr. Blackwook among with them, that upon the Provost's
coming up, Mr. Blackwood put himself in such a situation,
as he thought that he inteded to strike him, upon which
his Lordship seized Mr. Blackwood and took out of
his hand a Poker. That afterwards the Lord Provost
having represented in strong terms the irregularity
and impropriety of Mr. Blackwood's behaviour, took
his promise and word of honour, that he would immediately
go home and appear before him next day at
twelve O Clock. Upon which the Provost left him, but
had not got the length of the Croſs, till he again heard
that a man had been murdered
a great noise and was informed, that the same person
was proceeding in the Riotous manner he had done before.
That upon his Lordhsips return, when he had got as far as
the entry to the New Court, he observed some people running
whom he pursued, and went into a house a little

above Buns wynd, and pushing open the door he found
Mr. Blackwood and another young man whose name he
believes is Kennedy; That the Provost having expostulated
with Mr. Blackwood on his not performing his promise
in going immediately home he excused himself by
alledging that he coudl not get acceſs to his lodging, and
that he was to sleep with Mr. Kennedy, upon which his
Lordship left him, Mr. Blackwood having aſsured him
that he was not to stir that night from the room in which
he left them.

That the Lord Provost on returning homewards heard
that a man had been murdered in the Fray upon which
he went to the Mans house and found him severely wounded,
That the wounded man James Neilson Incleweaver
informed his Lordship that returning home that night,
with a Boy a relation of his own, he was attacked and
knocked down by Mr. Blackwood whom he knew, and
whose dreſs he described. That upon this recovering a
little and miſsing the Boy who had been with him fearing
that some misfortune had befallen him he returned
to the street and was again aſsaulted and knocked
down by the same person - That Mr. Blackwood did not
appear next day according to the promise upon his honour
that he had given to the Lord Provost - Upon this being read
over to my Lord Provost, he acknowleged the above to be
the substance of the fact as far as he remembers (Signed)
Will Wight


At the house of James Neilson Incleweaver
in Glasgow between three and four OClock
afternoon of April 10th 1769

Present Mr. Anderson and Dr. Reid. Being a Committee
appointed to examine the said James Neilson concerning
a Riot of some students on St. Patrick's night and the
said James Neilson being interrogate Declares that on
St. Patricks night about twelve O'Clock he was coming
home from a friends house goether with John Bayne
an Incleweaver, that when opposite to the Principal's gate
he met four young men that one of these four took hold of
him and asked if it was he that had thrown a Clod at
him that the Declarator replied I never saw you in the [face]
before upon which the said young man knocked him
down with a clear Iron poker, that after lying a little
he the Declarant got up and called upon his companion
and had come down to the place of the street opposite
to the Grammar School wynd where he was overtaken
by the same young man who had knocked him down
before, that there the same young man knocked him
down a second time with the Poker and when he was
lying upon the ground gave him many strokes upon
the head and other parts of the body That after lying there
some time he got up and was able to crawl home, that
after he was at home sometime the Provost came in, that
the Provost showed him a poker and asked if he had been

knocked down with that, that the Declarant's reply was
that he believed it was because it was clear That the
Provost asked him several other questions about the
pserson who knocked him down but as he was very ill
he cannot recollect his answers Being asked if any body
had offered him money as a rewqard in order to smother
this matter Declares that nobody has
James Neilson

Alexander Brown Shoemaker being called appeared
and being asked what he saw of a Fray on St. Patricks
night in which James Neilson was concerned Declares
that about twelve O Clock at night he was alarmed with a
noise on the street that his house is next to the Grammer school wynd
and only up one laigh story that upon looking out at his
window he saw a little lad dreſsed in black leave his
three companions and run up to James Neilson and
the young lad who was along with him, that soon after
he learned by James Neilsons cries that he was struck
that James Neilsons companion upon this ran away -
That soon after James Neilson came down the street towards
the Declarants window that the Declarant intreated
him to come up to his house that while this
was paſsing the man in black who had struck James
Neilson before together with his three companions came
dowm the street that James Neilson went up towards the
mouth of the Grammar School wynd that the said four

persons pursued him in a violent manner, that the Declarant
called to them to spare the mans life upon which great
stones were thrown up at his window but which of these
four persons threw them he knows not that this obliged
him to shut his window that after the noise ceased he
opened his window again and saw the said four persons
opposite to the Principal's house that he soon after saw
the Provost with some soldiers that he said to the Provost
he believed a man was murdered that he saw the same
person in black who had attacked James Neilson in the
Custody of the soldiers that he heard the said person in
black promise to the Provost that he would appear before
his Lordship next day that he saw James McGill Blacksmith
who he believes had seen some part of the Riot
in Company with the Provost That after the provost was
gone sometime the said four persons came down the street
again and that he saw them in company with the soldiers
and that soon after this the Declarant went to bed.
Alexr. Brown
John Anderson Cher Com
Glasgow College
April 11th

The Committee being appointed by the University [¿]
of this date to meet this afternoon did accordingly
meet this afternoon at a quarter past 5 o Clock
the following members being present Dr Trail

præses, the Dean. Dr. Leechman, Mr. Moorhead
Mr. Clow, Mr. Anderson, Dr. Wilson & Dr. Reid

Mr. Woodburn being asked declared that
he was invited on St Patricks day by a company of
thirty Gentlemen to dine with them but could not have the
happineſs of attending them till the evening on account
of another engagement he was under, that he went
to them however about Six in the evening when the
company as was natural was abundantly merry
& tho he thinks it highly indelicate & improper to publish
the sentiments of a private Company yet since
he was called on by this Court to do it, & some others
of the Company had done it before him Declared that
he would tell the Truth so far as he remembered concerning
Mr. Robisons affair & his. He declared that
the Company when he entered it was abundantly
merry & that both songs & sentiments which are
commonly called bawdy were already commenced
in the Company & [¿] so far Seconded even by Mr.
Robertson who he thinks joined in the Chorus and
drank his glaſs as well as any other person present.
And that these Songs and these Sentiments
were even given (if he rightly remembers) by Tutors
& Pupils who were seemingly a good deal connected
with Mr. Robison and without meeting with the smallest
sign of his dissaprobation As for himself he Declares

that his conduct he believes during this time was much
below the notice of any body but his next neighbour
with whom he conversed That he drank his glaſs refusing
neither to sing or to tell stories for which he confeſses
he was never qualified That the Toast-master at last
commenced with C_t and demanded a round of similar
sentiments to that in this he was obeyed till it came to him
whom he ordered particularly go give a toast similar to those that
had gone before him. That he told him he had no sentiments
that were similar and after pausing a little in order
to avoid saying anything obscene he told him he might
drink the Scarlet if he pleased which was immediately
done without any dispute Mr. Robison however it
seems who had not found fault with any body before
wanted to pick a quarrel with him and perceived
something obscene in his sentiment which neither he
nor the Company had perceived that Mr. Robison
immediately aſked him with a tone of importance
what he meant by such a sentiment that he immediately
told him he meant nothing at all. Nothing at
all Sir said Mr. Robison. I do not understand you, with

a good deal of indifference And that he the Declarant
with a good deal of coolneſs replied that he knew not
how far he was obliged to explain himself to Mr.
Robison in such a company but that Mr. Robison
might mean what he pleased by the toast. Mr. Robison
however was still diſsatisfied and still insisted upon
an explanation Upon which he the Declarant told him
he might mean the Military if he pleased Mr.
Robison however was still diſsatisfied and he told him
he might mean the whore of Babylon if he pleased
at last Mr. Robison told him he was damned impertinent
and took his hat and left the Company immediately
Upon which he the Declarant was pretty
much picqued at such insolent treatment and that
nothing but his being sober at the time and his regard
for the company prevented him from resenting it immediately
upon the spot that he got up immediately
however to follow Mr. Robison in order to ask him if
he meaned to insult him but was prevented from going out by some
of the gentlemen who were coing in at the door and
who asked him if he was going to leave them already
Upon which he told them that he was only going to

ask Mr. Robison was was upon the stair and who had treated him ill what he
meant by doing so and that he would return
in a little Still however they insisted upon his staying
and preſsed him at last to sit down Upon which Mr.
Wilson immediately observe that he the Declarant
had been very ill used by Mr. Robison Upon which some
other of the company swore that they who had invited
him had been worse used and that if they had been
present they would have kicked Mr. Robison down
stairs That every body disapproved of Mr. Robisons
conduct and the only apology that was made for him
was that he was mortally drunk That the Declarant
for his part declares he was perfectly sober and
believes the company will declare the same That he
proposed that aſsoon as the wine was drunk that was
upon the table that they should all go home immediately
to their apartments this proposal however was not
agreed to and he thought proper to go home himself
though the company preſsed him to stay That next
morning he met with some of the Gentlemen who
were in the Company who told him that they had

been talking of his affair and Mr. Robisons last
night after he the Declarant left them and
that the company were unanimously of opinion
that he would be a mean spirited blockhead if he
paſsed over the treatment he had met with from
Mr. Robison Upon which he told them he was sorry
to have anything to do with Mr. Robison but should
surely send for him and ask him if he intended to
use him ill by his last nights behaviour That he
accordingly did send for him but did not find him
till the Evening when he came in to the general society
Upn which he the Declarant went out and called
for Mr. Long who was one of the Company and told
him he was going to send for Mr. Robison out of the
Society and to ask him civilly in Mr. Long's presence
whether he had intended to insult him the Declarant
by calling him impertinent that he told Mr Long moreover
that he was extremely averse to do this if he
could poſsibly avoid it and should be extremely sorry
from several circumstances if Mr. Robison and him
should not make up the matter peacably That after this
Mr. Robison was sent for and appeared Upon which

he the Declarant told Mr. Robison that he was extremely
sorry to trouble him at this time but that he thought
he had been ill used by Mr. Robison and that some other
people had thought so too That he was conscious at
the same time of having given no manner of offence
to Mr. Robison that merited as he thought any ill
usage and begged therefore to know if Mr. Robison
intended to insult him openly. Upon which Mr.
Robison instead of making the remotest apology
told him directly that he intended openly to insult
and expose him and declared that if he had him in
the same company he would still treat him in the
same manner Told him also that his character was
already established and that he had always very little
regard for the Declarant Upon which he the Declarant
was pretty much picqued at the treatment he had

met with and told Mr. Robison that he begged leave
for the future to treat him with all that contempt
which his malicious conduct seemed so justly to
deserve That he told him moreover he would take
every method of vindicating his conduct in this
affair And Mr. Robison left him by telling him he
would take every method to expose him. There was no
more of it that evening that next morning Mr. Hay came
into his room where it seems there was some explanation
of the toast lying That Mr. Dun and Mr. McKinnon
were in his room at the time that Mr. Hay it seems requested
a copy of this explanation from Mr. Dun as he
now remembers for that he himself went out of his
room to talk with some other Gentlemen This explanation
or advertisement was shown it seems to several
Gentlemen but that he the Declarant did not concern
himself much about the matter that he wanted to
explain himself only to Mr Robison but thought he
was not upon a familiar enough footing at the time
to do it directly but was willing that it should be done
indirectly and chose that a copy of this explanation
with some corrections should be sent privately to Mr.
Robison which was sufficient as he thought to show the

absurdity of aſsigning either a good or a bad meaning
to the word Scarlet which might mean any thing and
which he had given as a meere expletive without all
meaning This corrected copy of the explanation he
committeed to the care of Mr. Hay who promised to
convey it secretly to Mr. Robison by means of a Cadie
or porter That some time after that Mr. Robison came
down to the College called on him the Declarant and
told him that he wanted to talk with him that the Declarant
went into the College called Area with Mr. Robison who held
a burnt paper in his hand and asked him if he had
sent him a challenge giving him ill names. Upon which
the Declarant told him that he had sent him no challenge
giving him ill names Mr. Robison then asked if he had
not referred the whole of this matter the other evening
Upon which the Declarant answered that he had never
referred it at all to the company, and gave him the lie
for telling some people that he had done so, appealing
at the same time to Mr. Long who had been present
for the truth of what he the Declarant aſserted. That afterwards
they walked along the pavement in silence and
as they were returning Mr. Robison made a flourish with his

Cane and broke it over the Declarants head Somebody
at the same time pulled the Declarants staff out of his
hand who was a good deal surprised at Mr. Robison's
violece and chose rather to defend himself than
injure Mr. Robison After a short scuffle had ensued
they were separated and Mr. Robison observed that he
was sorry he had put himself upon a footing with the
Declarant and that he in his turn observed that he was
ashamed to see himself on a footing with Mr.
Robison. Mr. Robison then said he would refer it to the
company and spoke to Mr. Rose a Gentleman who was
present and who had been one of the company to meet
next morning for that purpose That he the Declarant
did the same although he was fully satisfyed but that
Mr. Robison did not compear next morning and that
ever since they have not spoken together Being asked
whether upon Mr. Hay's coming into his room on Sunday
before mentiond he the Declarant said to him I have gott
by me an explication of a certain toast for the use of my
friends of which you may have a copy or words to that
purpose Declares that he does not particularly remember
what conversation he had with Mr. Hay that morning
but thinks he remmebers in general that Mr. Hay

look up this advertisement which was lying upon the table and
read it and requested as he thinks a copy of it and without
giving him any particular answer to his request
told him he thins in general that that seemed to be an
explanation of the toast that after making some observation
upon his hat left him in the room with Mr.
Dun and does not know what followed And being asked
whether he expreſsed any desire that Mr. Hay should
read that paper in Mrs. Lindsay's family Declares that
he does not remember his having expreſsed any such
desire but thinks, that Mr. Dun or Mr. McKinnon told
him after he came in that Mr. Hay had expreſsed a great
desire of doing so himself Being asked whether he
desired Mr. Hay to gainsay retract or eat up what he
had told his Tutor about his having conveyed the letter
to Mr. Robison at Mr. Woodburns desire Declares that
he did not, but that he met with Mr. Hay sometime
after who told him that he had been obliged to betray
his trust by his Tutor who threatned him if he did
not do it, he also added that he was sorry for having done
so and was ready to give the Declarant any satisfaction
he pleased for breaking his word upon which the
Declarant answered that if he Mr. Hay was himself

satisfied he the Declarant was also satisfied and was
not at all sorry for his having told the whole of that
affair to Mr. Muter especially as he was his Tutor
Being asked where this conversation between
him and Mr. Hay was held Declares that it was somewhere
within the College but does not particularly
remember the spot
David Woodburn

The Committee resolved to report the above to the
university meeting in order to receive their farther
directions
R. Traill, præses
John Anderson, Cler. Com.
Glasgow College
April 11th
Present Dr. Wilson, Mr. Anderson, Dr. Leechman, Dr.
Trail præses Dr. Reid & Mr. Muirhead

The Committee being duely Conveened according to
the appointment of the University Meeting of this days
date And Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn being called
Compeared. Mr. Woodburn being asked whether on St.
Patricks night and in the Eagle tavern soon after he gave

the Scarlet for his toast he said it did or might signify Cunt
Declares that he did not aſsign any bad meaning to the word
scarlet himself but that Mr. Robison might mean by that
word any thing he pleased and after having
told Mr. Robison that he Mr. Robison might mean a
variety of things by it he does not perfectly remember
whether he told him he might mean that monosyllable
or not but is absolutely certain that he told Mr. Robison
he had no meaning to that toast and never pretended
himself to give any meaning to it Being asked whether
on the day after in the College Area and in the presence
of Mr. Long he did not own that he had given an explanation
of the toast such as is put in the above question Declares
that he had no occasion to own any such thing but thinks
he told Mr. Robison that he might mean that if he pleased
as he seemed anxious all along ot have some such meaning
Being aſked Whether he did not sup in Mr. John
Moore's that night and whether he did not in conversation
after supper say that in McDonald's he gave the above
mentioned explication of scarlet which wa his toast.
Declares that he did sup in Mr. Moor's that night but did
not speak a word of the whole affair at suppor or in the
Company

Being asked whether when in the Area with Mr. Long he recollected that Mr.
Robison should have said before you use these freedoms
with my name something elſe must happen and
Mr. Robison being asked what must happen answered
in words bearing this meaning I must explain my
conduct to the whole company Declares that he does
not recollect Mr. Robisons having said so but perfectly
remembers that when he told Mr. Robison he
must beg leave to call him a puppy for the future that Mr.
Robison told him that it gave him no uneasineſs whatever
he the Declarant should call him and with regard to
what was said about the company he perfectly remembers
that Mr. Robison said if he had him the declarant
in the same company he would expose him in the same
manner a second time and is also certain that no reference
was made to the judgement of the company that
evening otherwise that he the Declarant would certainly
have agreed to it because most of the company had
spoke to him upon the point and told him that they
thought he had been badly used in the company to which
they had invited him Being asked whether the company
present in McDonalds heard the conversation between him

and Mr. Robison about the toast or whether they had it only
by information form him to wit the Declarant. Declares that
he remembers he di not represent that affair to the whole
company but told it to the gentleman who held him at the door
and preſsed him to sit down again and that thereupon Mr. Wilson
observed that he the Declarant had been ill used by Mr.
Robison and thinks that he added that Mr. Robison was
surely the worse of Liquor and is certain that Mr. Wilson
could have that account from nobody but from his own
observation because Mr. Wilson could not know what intention
the Declarant had in attempting to go out neither
could he hear what the Declarant said to the gentleman who
met him at the door. Mr. Robison being asked whether
indecent toasts had not be given or indecent songs sung
and even by some Tutors and their pupils without any
reprehension from Mr. Robison before he gave the Check
to Mr. Woodburn so often mentioned Declares that he heard
no indecent toasts given by any Tutor or pupil except one
which was apologized for by the person who gave it upon
his being checked for it by a Tutor sitting next to him
and that with respect to songs Mr. Robison could not privately
check the singers one of whom was not his acquaintance
and both of whom were of opposite sides of the table from
Mr. Robison and that he the Declarant did not give any
countenance to such songs except perhaps by laughing at

their drollery and that he has even reason to think that one of
the singers Stopt in the middle of the song by observing Mr. Robison
looking him stedfastly in the face and said it was too blackguard
Being asked if he did not remember that a young gentleman
who sat between Mr. Reose and Mr. Woodburn when Mr. Rose
commenced with a baudy toast did not give an openly
obscene toast without making any apology for it or meeting
with any check from Mr Robison for it Declares
poſitively that he did not hear it and that he heard
only five such toasts one of which was given by Mr. Rose
another he does not know by whom two that were apologized
for When checked by a Tutor sitting next to the
givers and the fifth by Mr. Woodburn And that Mr. Robison
when asked for such a toast peremptarly refused it, gave
a decent toast saying that he would give no other and in
this conduct was followed by Mr. Pitt who sat next him
in order Mr. Woodburn being asked whether on the
Saturday or Sunday immediately after St. Patricks day he
did not say to a gentleman that he Mr.
Woodburn had caled Mr. Robison a Cowad and a Villain
or words to that purpose Declares that he remembers to
have told what happened between him and Mr. Robison
only to two or three particular friends and that he told
nothing to them but what he had told to Mr. Robison in

presence of Mr. Long and that he does not remember particularly
at this time what contemptible names he gave
Mr. Robison that evening but is absolutely certain that he
never gav any account of that matter without appealing
to Mr. Long for the truth of what he aſserted and in
order to vindicate his conduct in that affair Being
asked whether he the Declarant did not inform a gentleman
that sometime before the scuffle on Mondays evening
he had told what had happened upon St. Patricks night and
what had paſsed the day after in presence of Mr. Long to Mr.
John Moore and Mr. Thomas Dunlop in Mr. Moore's house
and his account blame greatly the behaviour of Mr.
Robison towards the Declarant both in the tavern on St.
Patricks night and in the presence of Mr. Long Declares
that he told he always thought that Mr. Robison had used
him very ill in the whole of that affair but that he
never told any other story than what is told in the above
narration which story he related to Mr. Moore and Mr.
Dunlop in the way above narrated in his declaration and
with a view to vindicate his own conduct Being asked
if on the Monday after St. Patricks day he did not enquire
at Mr. Hay what was become of Mr. Robison and being
told that Mr. Robison was ill in bed said that he would
send him something in the afternoon which would touch

him up Declares that he said not a single word to Mr.
Hay concerning any thing he was to send to Mr. Robison
but remembers that he asked at Mr. Hay on the Monday's
evening whether Mr. Robison was at home or not. Being
asked whether upon being shown the scorched letter by
Mr. Robison Mr. Robison did not ask him whether he was
not the author of it and what his answer then was to
Mr. Robisons question Declares that he remembers nothing
else that paſsed between him and Mr. Robison that evening
but What he has already declared and that he does not
remember any such question nor recollects any thing
else Being asked whether upon Monday between breakfast and five O Clock
he had seen Mr. Clawson and had any conversation with
him about his difference with Mr Robison and whether
Mr. Clawson told him any thing of a proposal of reference
by Mr. Robison Declares that he talked with Mr. Clawson
sometime upon Monday and that Mr. Clawson told him
that Mr. Robison in hi saccount of hte conversation that happened
upon saturdays evening in presence of Mr. Long between
him and the Declarant told him that he had acted with
discretion in that matter and had referred it to the
decision of the company which account was contradicted
by the Declarant and Mr. Long if he the Declarant

rightly remembers but that he heard no proposal of any
reference that was to be made by Mr. Robison or of any
proposal to that purpose Only Mr. Clawson said that he
thought it woudl be much better for Mr. Robison and the
Declarant to make up the matter Being asked whether
he remembers particularly that Mr. Robison joined in
the chorus of a baudy song on St. Patricks night Declares
that he does not remember particularly having heard Mr.
Robison's voice among the rest of the voices but is certain
that he saw Mr. Robison aughing heartily with the rest
of the company at some of these songs And that Mr. Robison
himself sung a song wherein he added some particular
stanza which he the declarant does not remember but
which appeared to him to be somewhat smutty or to convey
some idea of that nature And some of the gentlemen
observed that, that sentence was alwys omitted by the
Ladies Being asked if he remembers the name of the
song Declares that he does not remember the name of the
song Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn desire that by
their subscriptions subjoined it is to be understood that
each adheres respectively to the answers by them given
to the several questions of the Committee above mentioned
from page sixty seven to page seventy five
John Robison
David Woodburn


This Committee is adjourned till to morrow at
twelve O Clock
R. Traill, præses
Glasgow College
April 14th

Present Dr. Trail præses Dr. Leechman Mr. Anderson
Mr. Muirhead & Dr. Reid

The Committee being duely concerned according to
their adjournment they did no busineſs because
Mr. Robison was obliged to go out of Town and therefore resolve
to report so far as they have hitherto proceeded to the University
Meeting
R. Traill, præses

The Committee being duely conveened according to
their Adjournment they did no busineſs because
Mr. Robison was obliged to go out of Town and therefore resolve
to report so far as they have hitherto proceeded to the University
Meeting
R. Traill, præses
Glasgow College
18th April 1769
The Committee being duely summoned and Conveened
Dr. Leechman was elected præses and the Committee
being informe that Mr. Hay is indisposed Agreed to examine
him in his own room in presence of the Parties

After which Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn being called
Compeared & Mr. Robison being Asked what was the order
in which the Gentlemen were sitting at the end of the table
where he was when the Toast Scarlet was given, and particularly
whether Mr. Robison's Toast and Mr. Pitt's were
given before the Toast Scarlet was given by Mr. Woodburn
Decares that he cannot distinctly recollect the precise
order but thinks that Mr. Pitt was on his right hand
and Mr. Woodburn on his left and his reason for thinking
so is that Mr. Woodburn upon his coming in to the Company
sat down upon his left hand and he does not recollect
that Mr. Woodburn shifted his seat till that after the
Toast was given he Mr. Woodburn rose up and sat down
at the other side of the table. He cannot distinctly remember
whether Mr. Pitt and Mr. Robison gave the Toasts aluded
to before or after Mr. Woodburn gave the Scarlet.
John Robiſon.

Mr. Woodburn being asked what he remembers concerning
the above question Declares that when he entered
the room he sat down upon the same side of the table with
Mr. Robison and upon his left hand and as some people
were sitting betwixt him and Mr. Roison he does not
remember to have heard any thing concerning any Toast
that Mr. Robison gave or was desired to give and that while
he the Declarant sat upon that side of the table he

The Declarant gave no toast that was taken notice of he
believes by any body and is certain that no round of
particular Toasts was desired by the Toastmaster. After
a considerable number of the company had departed
he remembers to have removed to the other side of the
table and sat down next to Mr. Agnew and the Toast Master
he remembers also that Mr. Long was sitting upon his
right hand and that after some time Mr. Robison changed
his side of the table and came over and sat down he thinks
upon Mr. Long's right hand and that after having conversed
with him some time and with some others Mr. Long rose and
went out upon which there was an empty chair betwixt
Mr. Robison and him the Declarant. That it was not till
after this that Mr. Rose the Toastmaster demanded a
round of sentiments similar to the one himself gave
That he was obeyed by the person or persons that sat between
him and Mr. Woodburn that it was then that Mr. Woodburn
gave the Scarlet and that he is certain that Mr. Robison
who was to suceed him in giving a Toast drunk no more
glaſses that night in that company. Being asked who
was sitting on Mr. Woodburn's left hand when gave the
Toast Scarlet Declares that an empty chair was sitting
upon it and Mr Agnew next to that as he rightly remembers.
Being asked whether the corrected copy of the
explanation of the Toast Which he says he committed

to the care of Mr. Hay was written and corrected by himself
or by whom. Declares that he can give no particular
answer to that question.
David Woodburn

Mr. Robison being asked if he can recollect any thing
further concerning the order of the company and Toasts.
Declares that the persons mentioned by Mr. Woodburn
as sitting between him and Mr. Robison were Mr. Rodgers
and Mr. Pollock the former of whom left the room several
times and once upon his return to the Company gave
a decent toast which occasioned the toasts given by Mr.
Robison and Mr. Pitt above aluded to. Declares further
that at the time Mr. Woodburn gave the Scarlet the
person sitting up on the Toastmasters right hand was
mr. James McDowel who had not given an indecent
toast and who heard Mr. Woodburn's toast and its
indecent explanation. Declares further that his reason
for thinking that Mr. Woodburn is mistaken with respect
to the side of the table on which he sat and that Mr.
Woodburn shifted his seat after giving the toast is that
he Mr. Robison does not recollect having shifted his own
seat and yet remembers having Mr. Pitt on his right
hand and Mr. Woodburn opposite to him soon after the
Scarlet was given and that at that time the company
were taking no notice of the altercation betwixt him
and Mr. Woodburn. Declares further that he does not

remember whether he drank any more or not but recollects
that Mr. Pitt and he said to each other that they were tired
of the noise and proposed going away. Mr. Robison
adds that his very imperfect recollection of the whole
affair was the reason why on Saturday evening he
desired Mr. Woodburn to put him in mind of the circumstances.

John Robiſon.

The Committee then informed Mr Robison and Mr.
Woodburn that they are immediately to adjourn to
the bed chamber of Mr. Hay in order to read over to
Mr. Hay his former declaration and to give both
Mr. Woodburn and Mr. Robvison an opportunity of
hearing Mr Hay's Evidence read face to face and
an opportunity of croſs questioning Mr. Hay if they
shall think proper, and both of them are hereby
summoned to attend the said Examination. Upon
which Mr. Woodburn Declared that as he had no
particular questions to ask at Mr. Hay he did not
think it proper to attend his precognition but
that he should attend the examination of any other
person if he had any thing particular to ask them
Da. Woodburn
John Anderson Cler. Com.


The Committee being duely conveened in Mr. Hay's
bed-chamber Mr. Hay's Declaration contained in pages
Seventeenth Eighteenth nineteenth and twentieth was read
over to him And he Declared that he adhered to every
thing contained in the said Declaration as the truth
and nothing but the truth Being asked whether he was
promised any rewqrd or good deed or if any person
directed him to give Evidence in this affair Declares
that nobody did. Mr. Robison then being asked if he had
any question to put to Mr. Hay. put the following Did
you Mr. Hay see the inside of the paper that you was
disired to convey to me in the form of a letter to which
Mr. Hay answered that he did not. Mr. Hay upon this
being further interrogate by Mr. Robison Declared that
on the Monday forenoon after St. Patricks day Mr.
Woodburn said to the Declarant upon hearing that Mr.
Robison was ill that he Mr. Woodburn woud give him something
that would trouble him more than his stomach or
words to that purpose Being asked by the Committee
Declares that on the Sunday after St. Patricks day when
he the Declarant was in Mr. Woodburn's room, Mr. Woodburn
took the advertisement so often mentioned, out of his pocket
said that he had it for the use of his friends and gave it
to Mr. Dun and Mr. McKinnon to be copied that Mr. Woodburn

further added that it related to the Toast and difference
between him and Mr. Robison and that he wanted to make
it publick, that Mr. Dun and Mr. McKinnon knew this as
well as he the Declarant and that they entertained not the
least doubt concerning the meaning of it That it was about
two O Clock on the day after the Scuffle and in the area
of the inner Court that Mr. Woodburn asked the Declarant
to eat in or retract what he had said. Being asked if he
the Declarant when in Mr. Woodburn's room on the Sunday
after St. Patricks day ex propria motu expreſsed any
desire to read it himself in Mrs. Lindsay's family
Declares expreſsly that he did not - John Hay
John Andeson Cler. Com.

The Committee being duely Conveened in the Charter
room after the above examination of Mr. Hay, the whole
Declaration of Mry. Hay both this day and on a former day
was read over to Mr. Woodburn by order of the Committee
Upon which Mr. Woodburn desired to know whether he was
now called as a party and this request was seconded by
Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn added that till once he
knew whether he was called as a party or not he could
not attend this Meeting and ask questions at any witneſs
with propriety To which the Committee answered that
they were empowered by their constituents to Call Mr.
Robison and Mr. Woodburn again before them, to examine

them farther if they shall think proper, and ater reading to
them the declarations of all the witneſses to let them know
that they are at liberty to put such questions to the witneſses
as they shall think proper, and also to call any other witneſses
as they may think expedient for their own defence.

The above inute being again read over Mr.
Woodburn desired it to be marked that he imagined that it appeared evident from the
minute he was called as a party and begs leve to know
of the Committee what is his accusation and who accuses
him in oder that he may take proper and legal measures
in that matter. In answer to which the Committee ordered
the Clerk to read over to Mr. Woodburn a third time the order of the
University meeting above inserted in the minutes, as the
only anwer which the Committee could give. Upon
which Mr. Woodburn Declared that he thought it was no
satisfactory answer and begged leave to have a hearing
of the above question before the Faculty before he could
act as a party before this Committee Declaring
that if the Committee should notwithstanding this request
of Mr. Woodburn proceed to examine any witneſses he
must beg liberty to represent to the Faculty that he
cannot properly ask any questions at any witneſs till the
above question is answered Upon which the Committee
agreed to desire the Vice Rector to summon an University
meeting to be held in this place to morrow at twelve O Clock
in order to lay before them the above minutes of the Committee
Will: Leechman
John Anderson Cler Com.

Glasgow College
April 24th 1769


Sederunt Dr. Trail præses Dr. Leechman Mr. Corse
Mr. Clow Dr. Stivenson Mr. Anderson & Mr,
Muirhead

The Committee being duely summoned & conveened
Mr. Woodburn being called Compeared and desired that
it should be marked in the minutes that he denies the
articles which he has been accused of as they are laid
in the Extract of the minutes which he
received from the Clerk and thinks it needleſs to give
any other answer to these articles at present than he has
already given in his declaration.
Da: Woodburn

Mr. Robison being called compeared and the advertisement
which he received in the form of a letter being
asked by the Committee it was delivered by Mr. Robison
and signed by the præses and Clerk

Mr. John Hay being called compeared and his former
declarations being read over and he adhereing to them
Mr. Woodburn put the following questions to Mr. Hay
Did you Mr. Hay upon the Monday's evening after St.
Patricks's day give the above account that is given in your
declaration to Mr. Robison or Mr. Muter before the
Scuffle happened that evening between Mr. Robison

and Mr. Woodburn Declared that it was after the scuffle
between Mr. Robison & Mr. Woodburn that he Mr. Hay
spoke to Mr. Muter and Mr. Robison concerning the
above mentioned letter and advertisement but he believes
that Mr. Muter had seen the advertisement before that
Being asked whether or not he the Declarant considered
himself as being ill treated by Mr. Woodburn in that
affair and whether or not Mr. Muter at his request
had not complained to the Faculty of Mr. Woodburns
conduct to him in that affair Declares in the affirmative
Being asked by the Committee what was
the nature of the redreſs which he wanted for Mr.
Woodburn's having as he thought used him ill Declares that
all the satisfaction he wanted was that Mr. Woodburn
should beg his parton Being asked by Mr. Woodburn
whether he the Declarant had ever proposed to Mr. Woodburn
to ask his pardon prior to the complaint that
was made to the Faculty Declares in the negative.
John Hay

Mr. Woodburn desires it to be marked in the minutes
that as Mr. Hay had given no information to Mr. Robison
prior to the scuffle that happened between Mr. Robison and
Mr. Woodburn that whatever may be contained in his
declaration it could never afford Mr. Robison any ground
for acting as he did in that scuffle and moreover as Mr.
Hay evidently appears himself to be a party Mr. Woodburn
does not think that he can consider him at all as an evidence
in this affair


Mr. Robison desired it to be marked that he had all the
information concerning the first advertisement before
monday at ten O Clock before non That he mentioned this
advertisement to Mr. Clawson upon Monday before Breakfast
and that his knowledge of the particulars relating
to it was the only ground which he had for taxing
Mr. Woodburn with the second advertisement or letter
That Mr James Agnew and Mr. William McDowall heard
him converse upon the subject upon Sunday.

Mr. John Long being called Compeared and his declaration
contained in pages twenty sixth twenty seventh forty two
and forty-three being read over to him he adhered to the
same Declaring that it was the Truth Being asked by
Mr. Woodburn whether or not Mr. Robison did not declare
to Mr. Woodburn upon the Saturday's evening that he Mr.
Roison did intend to insult and expose Mr. Woodburn
by his behaviour the former evening before Mr. Woodburn
said or seemed to say a single uncivil word to Mr. Robison
Declares that when Mr. Woodburn alledged that Mr. Robison
wanted to fish out the meaning of his Toast and to expose
him that Mr. Robison answered that he did want to expose
him and as to the latter clause of the question he thinks
that there was no uncivil words said by Mr. Woodburn
before that time
John Lang

This Committee is adjourned to three O Clock afternoon
R. Traill, præses.

The Committee being duely conveened according to their
adjournment. Mr. Woodburn desired it to be marked in
the minutes That as he was accused of a certain number
of articles by the members of the Meeting he did not see
any right that any person or persons have to ask any questions
of any witneſs concerning these articles but his accusers
and himself or his council if he chused to call any and
therefore desired that Mr. Robison should be removed
To which it was answered by the Committee that before
Mr. Woodburn and Mr. Robison were called before
them this day it was agreed by the Committee that
the witneſses should be examined in the presence of
them both in order to save a double examination of
the same facts and that accordingly when Mr. Hay was
called he was this day examined by Mr. Woodburn by
Mr. Robison and by the Committee and that in like
manner the Committee Mr. Woodburn and Mr. Robison
are to examine Mr. Long.

Mr. Woodburn desired it to be marked that Mr. Hay
never was examined in his presence by Mr. Robison and that
if any thing had been inserted in the minutes concerning
that he would certainly have opposed it as he cannot help
considering it as a very great hardship that his affair

should be spun out by means of any interruption which may
arise from Mr. Robison who it seems is neither considered
as a Judge or party in these articlees of which Mr. Woodburn
is accused

The Committee then declared that this
day between twelve and two O Clock Mr. John Robison in
the presence of the Committee and in the presence of Mr.
Woodburn put questions to Mr. Hay which were not inserted
in the minutes because they appeared to be of no moment
to any party nor did Mr. Woodburn at that time move this
objection or make any objectiosn to the questions when
put by Mr. Robison, that the members of the Committee
were the witneſses of this and Mr. Woodburn Mr. Hay
and Mr. Robison must remember that it was so.

Mr. Woodburn desires it to be marked that it was on
that very account of there being matters of no moment and
of there not being so much as attempted to be inserted in
the minutes that he did not think it worth his while to
make any objections to them. And still cannot help
considering it as a very great hardship that any person
who is neither a Judge nor an accuser should have any
right to interrupt and spin out his trial by any questions
whatever and begs leave to complain of that hardship to
the University Meeting.

The Committee informed Mr. Woodburn that Mr.
Robison is here present neither as a judge nor as an

accuser of Mr. Woodburn but as a party summoned by the
University meeting to answer for his conduct and that as
the several circumstances relating to it are closely connected
with the articles charged against Mr. Woodburn
and as several of the evidences are about to leave the
College justice requires that they should be examined
immediately and the Committee therefore resolves to
proceed in examining the witneſses and to allow the
parties to wit Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn to croſs
question them according to the orders of the University
Meeting.

Mr. Woodburn desires it to be marked that, that
answer gives him no satisfaction and that he still persists
in his complaint to the University Meeting and protests
against the Committee's proceeding in that manner as
he thinks it is injurious to him.

Mr. Anderson desires it to be marked that he with
other two will desire the Vice Rector this night to call
an University meeting to morrow morning at ten
O Clock in order to consider Mr. Woodburns protest
and complaint and that in the mean time he thinks
the Committee ought to proceed for the reasons above
aſsigned.

Mr. Long being called compeared and being further
interrogate by Mr. Woodburn whether or not he did not

Declare upon the Saturday evening that Mr. Woodburn called
Mr. Robison out of the Society that he Mr. Long thought
Mr. Robison's own account of his conduct that evening
tended to give him the declarant a much worse idea of
Mr. Robison's behaviour than he had had before entertained
of him. Declares that he did Being further
asked by Mr. Woodburn Whether or not Mr. Robison
declared that he would treat him as ill if he had him
before the same company Declares that he did Being
further asked whether or not Mr. Woodburn declared
to him the Declarant before he called Mr. Robison
out of the Society that he intended to use Mr. Robison
with the greatest civility provided Mr. Robison
did declare that he did not intend to insult and
expose him by his behaviour the former evening
Declares that he did and being asked by Mr. Robison
whether Mr. Robison in the conversation with Mr. Woodburn on the Saturday
after St. Patricks day did not say words to this purpose
that he did not think that any of the company at McDonald's
heard the check given by him to Mr. Woodburn and that
Mr. Woodburn said that he imagined thay all heard it
and that it was in order to vindicate himself to that
company that he insisted on this explanation with Mr.
Robison Declares that he does not remember either of
these circumstances. Being further interrogate whether

he heard Mr. Robison during that conversation say
words to this purpose That he himself was the only judge
of what paſsed in his own breast and that this was
disgust at Mr. Woodburn's impropriety of behaviour
and that this was the sentiment he expreſsed to Mr.
Woodburn (Mr. Robison during the interrogation saying
that he meant this to signify that the check
above alluded to was the expreſsion of disgust but
not of any intention to expose) Declares that he does
not remember Being further interrogate by Mr.
Robison whether during that conversation Mr. Robison
never once attempted to vindicate himself from Mr.
Woodburn's charge of intending to insult and expose
him to the company at McDonald's Declares that he
does not recollect any such attempt Being further
Interrogate whether upon Mr. Woodburn's giving Mr.
Robison abusive names and threatning to repeat them
afterwards Mr. Robison interrupted him by saying
that before he did so something else must happen
and that Mr. Woodburn turning hastily to Mr. Robison
said what must happen sir to which Mr. Robison
answered in words to this purpose that he must tell
or explain or justify (he does not recollect which word)
his conduct to the company Declares that he heard
Mr. Robison say that he would have a meeting of the

company to explain to them Mr. Woodburns behaviour

Being asked by Mr. Woodburn if he thought Mr. Robison
meaned to refer that matter to the judgement and decision
of the company Declares that he did not think that that
was Mr. Robison's design. And being interrogate if Mr.
Woodburn did not in telling Mr. Robison what he had
said the former evening concerning the word Scarlet
say that not it might mean such a thing but that Mr.
Robison if he pleased might mean the Military &c by
that toast Declares that he did.

Being interrogate by Mr. Robison whether he saw
him engaged in a scuffle with Mr. Woodburn on Monday
evening after St. Patricks da and whether he thought
Mr. Robison behaved unfairly to Mr. Woodburn during
the scuffle Declares that he did not
John Lang

Mr. Robison desires it to be marked that he demands
the evidence of Mr. James McDowal of Mr. Gordon
Student of Law, Mr. William McDowal, Mr. MGeoch
student of philosophy, besides the witneſses already called

Mr. Woodburn desires it to be marked that he does
not intend to call any witneſses but such as have been
called already by his accusers and that he must beg
leave to declind the evidence of any extraneous

witneſs who may be called against him by Mr. Robison
who it seems is neither his Judge nor accuser.

Mr. Robison desires it to be marked that he does
not call these evidences for any other purpose but
that of defending himself

The Committee appoint John Bryce to call the
witneſses above named by Mr. Robison before them
next meeting which is hereby adjourned till to
morrow at twelve O Clock mid-day Dr. Trail being
gone the Committee appoint Dr. Leechman to sign
this minute
Will: Leechman
Glasgow College
April 25th. 1769

Present, the Dean of Faculty, Dr eechman, Mr Anderson, & Dr.
Reid

The Committee being duly convened according to their last
Adjournment Dr. Leechman was elected præses

Mr. Woodburn appeared and the minute of the
University Meeting of this day being read he desired
what follows to be marked To wit.

That as he understands from the whole minutes
of the meeting that Mr. Robison is only accused of one
article in common with him which is a scuffle that

happened upon Monday Evening after St. Patricks night
That he still cannot help considering that Mr. Robison
has no right to ask any questions in the course of Mr.
Woodburns trial concerning any of the other articles
of Mr. Woodburns accusation till once he be constituted
an accuser of Mr. Woodburn. Mr Woodburn adds
moreover that he denies his having acted any part
in that scuffle for which he is accused but the part of
the defensive which he thinks every man as a man is
entitled to do.

Mr. McGeoch being called Compeared and was
examined by the Committee as follows Did you Mr.
McGeogh see the beginning of a Scuffle between Mr. Robison
and Mr. Woodburn on the monday after St. Patricks night
Declares that he did Being asked if he the Declarant
heard Mr. Woodburn before the Scuffle began say that
he Mr. Woodburn knew nothing of a paper or letter
which Mr. Robison had in his hand Declares that he
did not hear any of the conversation before the Scuffle
began Being asked whether Mr. Robison during hat
Scuffle behaved like a man who was unwilling to be
engaged in that Scuffle or not Declares that he heard
Mr. Robison say once or twice that he was sorry to be
engaged in such an affair or words to that purpose but
as to his manner of acting he rather behaved like a man

who was willing to be engaged in that affair Being
asked whether he the Declarant thought that Mr.
Robison had sufficient provocation to be engaged in
it again after Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn had
been parted by Profeſsor Cumin Declares that he
recollects imperfectly the conversation which paſsed
between Mr. Robison & Mr. Woodburn immediately after
their being parted by Mr. Cumin Being asked Whether
Mr. Robison did not part from Mr. Woodburn the
moment Mr. Rose told him he had done enough Declares
that he did immediately Being asked whether he thought
that Mr. Robison during the scuffle behaved unfairly
towards Mr. Woodburn or whether Mr. Robison met
with any unfair usage from Mr. Woodburn Declares
that he thinks Mr. Robison did behave very fairly but
that there was part of the scuffle which he did not see
and of which consequently he cannot be a judge that as
to the second part of the question he thinks That Mr.
Robison met with no unfair usage from Mr. Woodburn
but that he is at some loſs to know the meaning of the word
unfair usage.
Jos: MGeough

The Committee then informed Mr. Woodburn that he
might tell the præses what questions he chose to be put
to Mr. McGeough Upon which Mr. Woodburn desired
it to be marked that though Mr. McGeough or any other

witneſs should be called by Mr. Robison who is not Mr.
Woodburns accuser as exculpatory evidences for Mr.
Robison yet that he Mr. Woodburn Under protestation
that he does not desist from his former complaints, desires
to ask any questions that he thinks proper for his own
exculpation at these witneſses.

Mr. McGeough being asked whether Mr. Woodburn
during the scuffle did not appear to act only a paſsive or
defensive sort of part in it without attempting any
violence against Mr. Robison Declares that he thinks he
seemed to act a defensive part
Jos: MGeough

Mr. Gordon being Called compeared And being asked
whether he heard Mr. Robison say to Mr. Woodburn in
McDonalds on St Patricks night that Mr. Woodburn
was impertinent Declares that he did not hear it Being
asked at the desire of Mr. Woodburn whether he saw any
indecent behaviour in Mr. Woodburn either in word or
deed that night at McDonalds Declares that he saw no
different behaviour in Mr. Woodburn from the rest
of the company and that none of Mr/ Woodburns behaviour
appeared to him the declarant to be improper Being asked
whether he the Declarant heard Mr. Robison join in the
chorus of a baudy song or sing any song which conveyed
obscene ideas Declares

in the Negative
Alex Gordon

Mr. James McDowal being called Compeared and
being asked at Mr. Robison's instance whether he heard
Mr. Robison call Mr. Woodburn impertinent in Mr.
McDonald's Upon St Patricks evening Declares that
he did not Being further asked whether he heard Mr.
Robison join in the chorus of a baudy song or sing any
song that conveyed obscene ideas Declares in the Negative
Being asked the order in which Mr. Robison Mr. Woodburn
and he sat at the table Declares that he sat next to Mr.
Woodburn upon one hand and that Mr. Robison was
next to Mr. Woodburn upon the other hand
James McDowall

Mr. Rose being called compeared and his declaration
in pages thirty fourth and thirty fifth being read to him he
adhered to it and declares that it is the truth Being asked
at the desire of Mr. Woodburn whether he the Declarant
perceived any indecent or improper behaviour in Mr.
Woodburn in the meeting at McDonalds Declares that he does
not recollect any indecent or improper behaviour in Mr.
Woodburn Being asked at the desire of Mr.Robison
whether he heard Mr. Robison give a baudy toast, join in
the chorus of a baudy song or sing any song that conveyed

obscene ideas Declares in the Negative
John Roſe

Mr. Hill Wilson Being called Compeared and
his declaration in pages thirty six thirty seven and thirty
Eight being read to him he adheres to it and declares it to
be the truth and being asked at the desire of Mr. Woodburn whether
or not he Mr. Wilson did not say to Mr. Woodburn that evening
at McDonald's and to the company after Mr. Robison went
out and to Mr. Thomas Dunlop next morning that he the
Declarant thought that Mr. Woodburn had been ill treated
by Mr. Robison in the company at McDonald's Declares
that he did Being asked what his judgement was founded
upon when he gave that opinion that is to say whether it
was founded upon words and actions which he himself the
Declarant was the witneſs of Or whether it was founded
upon a representation of facts made to him by Mr. Woodburn
by Mr. Thomas Dunlop or by whom Delcares that he thinks
it was from the conversation which he afterwards had with
Mr. Woodburna nd the other gentlemen that were in McDonalds
next to him and that he believes it was Mr. Dunlop and Mr.
Long but is not certain And being asked for Mr. Woodburn
whether he does not recollect that he particularly said
to Mr. Woodburn who was coming round behind his chair
that he thought Mr. Woodburn had been ill treated by Mr.
Robison prior to any convesation that happened upon

that affair Declares that he is not sure whether it was
before or after any conversation upon that subject Being
further asked whether he perceived any indecent behaviour
in Mr. Woodburn that evening Declares that he
did not Being asked for Mr. Robison whether he heard
Mr. Robison give a baudy toast, join in the chorus of a
baudy song, or sing any that contained such ideas -
Declares in the Negative Being further asked whether
upon a conversation with Mr. Robison Mr. Robison did
not say that his conduct was justifyable only because
Mr. Woodburn and he were each of them Tutors sitting
in the company with their pupils, and whether upon
this he the Declarant did not say that till then he
thought Mr. Robison much in the wrong but now was of
a contrary opinion Declares that
the conversation was such Being further asked whether
upon the Sunday following St. Patricks day he did not show
the advertisement or speak of it to Mr. James Agnew and
Mr. Muter and Mr. William McDowall expreſsing his
uneasineſs at it Declares that he did Being further
asked whether previous to the scuffle Mr. Robison did
not expreſs to him his unwillingneſs to come to any publick
quarrell with Mr. Woodburn Declares that he did
Being asked whether he the Declarant did not say to
Mr. Robison that it would be very difficult to avoid

it or words to that purpose Declares that he did
Being asked whether At McDonalds he heard the word
impertinent uttered by Mr. Robison soon after the toast
Scarlet was given whether he knew what it related to
whether he thought it was directed to Mr. Woodburn &
whether he saw any signs of displeasure between Mr.
Robison and Mr. Woodburn Declares that he heard the
word impertinent utterd by Mr. Robison, that he did not
at that time know what it related to, that he cannot say
whether he at that time thought it was directed to Mr.
Woodburn or not, and that he saw no signs of displeasure
between them but that he did not at that time pay any
particular attention to what was paſsing between them
so as to know whether they might not be such signs
between them
Hill Willson
This meeting is adjourned till half an hour past three
o Clock this afternoon
Will: Leechman

The Committee being duely conveened according to
their last adjournement Mr. Agnew being Called Compeared
and his declaration in pages thirty eight and thirty ninth being
read to him he adhered to it and Declares that it is the
truth and being asked for Mr. Woodburn if he the Declarant
was present at the commencement of a Scuffle that happened
upon Monday's evening after St. Patricks day in the College

area between Meſsrs. Robison and Woodburn And whether
Mr. Woodburn did not appear in that scuffle to act only a
paſsive or defensive part Declares that he did not see the
beginning of the scuffle and that he does not know whether
Mr. Woodburn acted in his own defence in that affair or not
Being asked whether there was any effusion of blood upon
either side or only struggling and a few dry blogs Declares
that there was no effusion of blood on either side so far as he
observed and that there was struggling and a few blows Being
asked for Mr. Robison whether he the Declarant at McDonalds
on St. Patricks night heard Mr. Robison Give a baudy
toast, join in the chorus of a baudy song, or sing any song
that conveyed obscene ideas Declares in the Negative so
far as he recollects Being further asked whether he the
Declarant did on the day preceeding the scuffle to wit on
Sunday say to Mr. Robison that Mr. Woodburn had told him
the Declarant that he Mr. Woodburn had mentioned the
whole affair in a house in Town where he had supped the
preceeding evening Declares in the affirmative Being
further asked whether Mr. Robison did not then expreſs
to him his resentment at Mr. Woodburns behaviour
in carrying that story out of the company in which it
had happened And whither Mr. Robison did not frequently
before the Scuffle insist upon this as a principal part of

his provocation Declares that he did Being asked for Mr.
Woodburn whether he did not mean what had happened
in the company of Mr. Long in the College Area Declares
that he meant both what happened in the Area in the
presence of Mr. Long and what had happened at McDonalds
on St. Patricks night as he understood the matter but does
not recollect that Mr. Woodburn said so to him Being
further asked Whether he perceived any improper behaviour
in Mr. Woodburns conduct in the meeting at
McDonald's Declares that he did not Being asked for
Mr. Robison whether he the Declarant upon the sunday
before the scuffle [¿] gave Mr. Robison any information
concerning the advertisement which was that day
brought to Mrs. Lindsay's, whether he imagined that that
advertisement was intended to ridicule Mr. Robison,
and whether he knows that any other copies of it were
that day brought to Mrs. Lindsay's Declares that he
did give Mr. Robison information. That from the
words of the advertisement itself he the Declarant
could not know whether the advertisment was intended to
ridicule Mr. Robison or not but Declares that from considering
the several circumstances he did at that time
think that the said advertisment was pointed at Mr.
Robison and Declares that he knows of no copies

but one that was brought to Mrs. Lindsays. Being further
asked whether he did not on the said Sunday tell
Mr. Robison that Mr. Wilson upon showing him the
advertisement expreſsed uneasineſs on Mr. Robison's
account Declares that he did Being further asked
whether he thought that Mr. Robisons behaviour during
the scuffle was agreeable to the laws usually fixed
for such encounters and whether Mr. Robisons behaviour
was that of a man who wanted to vindicate
himself or of a man who wanted to indulge violent
malice Declare that he thinks Mr. Robisons behaviour
was agreeable to the laws of such rencounters and
that his conduct was that of a man wanting to vindicate
himself
James Angew

Mr. Woodburn desires it to be marked that he does not
chuse to ask any questions at any witneſs concerning the
laws of boxing and that if he has broke through any of
these laws it was owing to his ignorance of that Science
and to his want of desire to encounter with Mr. Robison
in that form.

Mr. George Kennedy being called compeared and his
declaration in pages forty four forty five and forty six
being read he adhered to it and Declares that it is the

truth Being asked for Mr. Robison whether he the Declarant
heard Mr. Robison give a baudy toast, join in the
chorus of a baudy song or sing any song that conveyed
onscene ideas Declares that he does not recollect any
Being asked for Mr. Woodbur whether he the Declarant
perceived any indecent behaviour in Mr. Woodburn that
evening Declares that he did not Being further asked
if he recollects whether or not Mr. Woodburn proposed
to the company that evening that they should
break up drinking and all go home and that if they
did not he told them that he thought it was improper
for him to stay any longer in the company as he thought
they had all drunk enough that evening Declares that
he did but does not recollect particularly what time
of night it was
George Kennedy

Both Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn upon hearing the
Declaration of Mr. Robert Sinclair read to them page
thirty six declared that they had no questions to ask at
Mr. Sinclair and they therfore did not again desire him
to be called before the Committee and they declared
the same thing with regard to Mr. James Rogers whose
declaration is contained in page forty seven


Mr. William Dun Student of Divinity being called
Compeard and his declaration contained in pages twenty
second, twenty third, twenty fourth, twenty fifth and thirty
third being read he adhered to it And Declares it to be
the truth And being asked for Mr. Woodburn whether
Mr. Hay did not expreſs a great desire of having a copy of the
above explanation of the toast and of reading it in Mrs.
Lindsay's of his own free will and accord Declares that
he did Being asked what answer Mr. Woodburn made
to Mr. Hay's desire of having that paper to read in
Mrs. Lindsay's Declares that when he the declarant came
into Mr. Woodburn's room along with another gentleman
Mr. Hay either was in the room before him or came in immediately
after and that paper being lying on Mr. Woodburns
table some person in the Company whom the
Declarant does not recollect particularly read that
paper upon the hearing of which Mr. Hay expreſsed
his desire of having a copy of it But what Mr. Woodburn
said upon that occasion or if he said any thing at all
the declarant does not remember only either at that
instead or soon after he took his hat and went out And
further declares that Mr. Hay said when the Declarant
gave him the paper that he would read it at Mrs. Lindsay's
table Being asked for Mr. Robison whether on that Sunday

at the dismiſsing of the chappel in the forenoon he Mr. Dun did when standing at the
foot of Mr. Woodburn's stair make a signal to Mr. Hay
to follow him up stairs Declares that he did not
William Dun

Both Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn having heard the
declaration of Mr. Pitt contained in page forty four
read to him Declared that they had no questions to ask
at Mr. Pitt and therefore did not desire him to be called

Mr. John McKinnon being called Compeared and his Declaration
contained in pages twenty eight twenty ninth
thirty thirty one and thirty two being read he adhered to it
and Declares that it is the truth. Being asked for Mr.
Woodburn whether or not Mr. Hay of his own free will
and accord without any instigation from Mr. Woodburn
did expreſs a great desire of having a copy of that explanation
and of reading the same at Mrs. Lindsay's Declares
that as soon as the advertisement was read Mr. Hay cried
out with seeming extasy I must have a copy of that paper
and I will read it at Mrs Lindsay's table as son as she
Mrs. Lindsay is gone and further Declares that Mr. Hay
sought a copy of the advertisement of his own accord
witout being instigated by any body. Being further asked

if Mr. Woodburn had given him any particular account
of the above toast, and his reasons for ever giving that
toast when he the Declarant asked those of Mr. Woodburn
Declares that he asked Mr. Woodburn
that very night to with the seventeenth of March what
was his meaning in giving that toast to which he Mr. Woodburn
replied that he did so purely to avoid giving offence as
he did not think it proper to give a toast similar to the
round of toasts which was at that time demanded by the
Toastmaster And that this was between ten & Eleven O Clock
at night after Mr. Woodburn left the company at McDonald's
John MKinnon

This Committee is adjourned till to morrow at twelve
O Clock mid-day
Will: Leechman
Glasgow College
April 26th 1769

Present Mr. Muirhead, Mr. Anderson, Dr. Leechman
who was elected præses Dr. Trail & Dr. Reid
The Committee being duely summoned & Conveened
Mr. Woodburn and Mr. Robison Comnpeared and the
paper or advertisement delivered by Mr. Robison to the

Committee on the twenty fourth instant and signed by
the præses and Clerk being shown to Mr. Woodburn
he was asked whether the said paper or advertisement
is the paper or part of the paper which he conveyed
to Mrs. Lindsays by Mr. Hay in the form of a letter.
Declares that as the paper is not perfectly compleat
he cannot give any perfect or poſsitive answer to the
question. Being asked if he knows the hand writing
of the sane paper. Declares that as he did not write
the paper he cannot poſsitively declare whether it be
the identical hand or not. Being asked who wrote
the paper or letter which he conveyed by Mr. Hay to
Mrs. Lindsay's Declares that he does not chuse to betray
any of his private friends. Being asked for Mr. Robison
if he thinks hte paper signed by the præses and Clerk is
the paper or part of the paper which Mr. Robison showed
to Mr. Woodburn in the College Court a little before
their scuffle on monday after St. Patrick day. Declares
that he cannot tell whether it is the same paper or
part of the same paper or not because he paid no
attention to that paper in particular but attended
chiefly to Mr. Robison's words who was in a very great
flutter and talked warmly of an abusive paper which
he said he had received giving him ill names that

he the Declarant Declared that he was the author
of no abusive paper which gave Mr. Robison any ill
names. Being asked by the Committee whether he
thinks there was the following expreſsion in the above
mentioned paper conveyed to Mrs. Lindsay's by Mr. Hay,
to wit a man of Italick paſsions. Declares that he does
not poſsitively know as he did not so much as read over
the paper so far as he remembers before it was sent.
Being asked what he means in his declaration by
the following sentence, to wit, This corrected copy of the
explanation he committed to the care of Mr. Hay
who promised to convey it secretly to Mr. Robison
Declares that he meant a copy correctly wrote and
spelled because the copy he had seen of that advertisement
for the fist time was not so and that he trusted these
amendments entirely so far as he remembers to the
transcriber. Being asked how he knew that it was a
corrected copy for if he did not read it somebody must
have told him that it was so. Declares that he only knew
that from the confidence he had in the accuracy of his
friend who transcribed it. Being asked what be believed
were the contents of the above mentioned letter conveyed
by Mr. Hay Declares that he believed the Contents to
be the same explanation of a toast that was lying in
his rom a copy of which Mr. Hay had formerly received

but that he thinks he desired the transcriber to write coxcomb
not with an because he took it to mean the comb
that crows upon a cocks head that is red and resembles
Scarlet Being asked for Mr. Robison whether he the
Declarant was the original author or composer of the
above mentioned adveritsement. Declares that he does
not chuse to answer that question Being asked by the
Committee what is the meaning of and what persons he
means by the following words in his declaration, to wit,
These songs and these snetiments were even given, if he
rightly remembers , by Tutors and pupils who were seemingly
a good deal connected with Mr. Robison and
without meeting with the smallest sign of his disapprobation
Declares that though he himself and he only has been accused
of giving an indecent toast in that company that he does
not chuse to accuse any particular person and as for
Mr. Muter's satisfaction he does not remember that he
Mr. Muer did or said any thing indecent in that company he
adds moreover that he would not have mentioned that
the Toast master gve a toast which might afterwards
by some people be considered as improper if he had
not been told that the Toast master had declared that
himself
David Woodburn


Alexander Gouans College servant being called Compeared
and being shown the above mentioned adveritsement
signed by the præses and Clerk Declares that he thinks
it is the papers which he delivered to Mr. William McDowall
in order to be given to Mr. Robison Being asked when it
was he thinks he delivered the said paper to Mr. McDowall
Declares that he does not remember the exact time but
is sure that it was after the Scuffle in the College Court
between Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn Being asked
for Mr. Robison where and when he got that paper.
Declares that he found it in the upper area of the College
lying upon the ground and thinks that he found it while
Meſsrs. Woodburn and Robison were scuffling together. Being
asked whether he saw it fall out of Mr. Robisons hand
Declares that he did not Being asked whether he saw
that paper in Mr. Robisons hand before the Scuffle.
Declares that he did not.
Alexander Gowans

Both Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn having heard
the declaration of Mr. Thomas Thornton contained in pages
forty sixth and forty seventh read to them Declared that they
had no questions to ask at Mr Thornthon and therefore did
not desire him to be called and made the same declaration
as to Mr. Philip Johnston whose declaration is contained
in pages forty eight and forty ninth.

Mr. Thomas Dunlop being called Compeared and his
Declaration contained in pages thirty nine forty forty one and
forty two being read he adhered to it and Declares it to be the
truth. Being sked for Mr. Woodburn if he the Declarant
perceived any indecent or improper behaviour in Mr. Woodburn
at McDonald's on St. Patricks night Declares that he
did not being further asked if therew as any apology -
offered in behalf of Mr. Robison by any of the company that
evening Declares that he heard some of the company excuse
Mr. Robison by saying he was drunk Being further asked
whether or not Mr. Hill Wilson did not declare to the
company that Evening and to him the Declarant next
morning that from what he Mr. Wilson perceived of Mr.
Robison's conduct to Mr. Woodburn that he thought Mr.
Woodburn was ill used by Mr. Robison Declares that
Mr. Wilson did say to the company that evening and to
the Declarant next day that he thought Mr. Woodburn
was ill used by Mr. Robison. Being asked for Mr. Robison
whether Mr. Wilson said to the company and to him that
he thought so from what he himself perceived of Mr.
Robison's conduct Declares that he did not mention
any reason for his opinion and being asked for Mr.
Woodburn if there were not a great number of toasts and
some songs commonly called baudy given in the

company that evening by various persons without meeting
with any check. Declares that there were Being
asked for Mr. Robison whether any of them were given
by Mr. Robison. Declares that he does not recollect any
given by Mr. Robison Except you chuse to call some of the
last verses of down the burn Davie by that name Being
further asked whether he heard Mr. Robison sing down
the Burn Davie Declares that he thinks he did. Being
further asked whether he heard Mr. Robison refuse
following out a toast given by another gentleman to wit
honour and honesty and instead of giving the words
often subjoined to that toast give well timed claffing.
Declares that he did not hea Mr. Robison refuse to follow
out the toast nor does he remember what toast he gave.
Being further aksed whether he did not hear Mr. Rose
say why did not Mr. Robison follow out the toast or words
to that purpose Declares that he did after the toast was
some time past Being further asked whether he heard
some indecent toasts checked by Mr. Muter. Declares
that he did not Being asked by the Committee whether
he thinks Mr. Robison sang the last part of down the burn
David which as he the declarant says above some might chuse
to call baudy Declares that he thinks he did. Being asked
whether the verse with which Mr. Robison ended when

he sung the song was this Love only saw the rest Declares
that he thinks it was and that he thinks these were the very
last words of the song
Thos Dunlop

This Committee is adjourned till half an hour past three
o Clock this afternoon
Will: Leechman

At half an hour past three O Clock afternoon The Committee
being duely conveneed according to their adjournment
Mr. James Agnew being called Compeared And being asked
for Mr. Robison Whether he Mr. Agnew did in the College
garden hear Mr. Woodburn own to him that he Mr. Woodburn
was the author or composer or contriver of the advertisement
which gave Mr. Robison so much offence. Declares
that Mr. Woodburn did say he was the original author
of that adveritsement. Being asked for Mr. Woodburn
when he Mr. Woodburn said so to Mr. Agnew Declares
that it was the day after the scuffle happened in the
College Court and that it was when the Declarant
and Mr Woodburn were walking in the College garden
and being further asked if Mr. Woodburn said to Mr
Agnew in these very words that he was the original
author of the above mentioned advertisement Declares
that to the best of his knowlege it was the original

author or writer Being asked whether in the course of
conversation with Mr. Woodburn in the College garden
Mr. Woodburn said any thing of the Scuffle on the preceeding
night and particularly whether he said that he Mr. Woodburn
was the author of the letter or paper which Mr. Robison
showed to Mr. Woodburn a short time before the scuffle
began Declares that he does not remember the particulars
relating to the scuffle and that he knew of no
letter or paper but the advertisement before mentioned
which he saw in the hands of Mr. Hill Wilson
James Agnew

Mr. Thomas Dunlop being called Compeard And
being asked for Mr. Woodburn Whether Mr. Wilson did
not say to him that he heard Mr. Robison call Mr. Woodburn
impertinent after he gave his Toast Declares that he
thinks he did so and that it was in the company at McDonalds
Thos Dunlop

Mr. John McKinnon being called Compeared and
being shown the advertisement produced by Mr. Robison
and signed by the Preses and Clerk was asked by the
Committee whether he knows the hand writing in the
said advertisement Declares that he has alread told the

Committee every thing he knows about that paper
Being further asked to read over again the above question
and give a poſsitive answer yes or no.
Mr. Woodburn desired it to be marked that Mr.
McKinnon repeated the same answer which he had done
formerly and when he was going out added that he was
obliged to see a gentleman who was going out of town
immediately

Mr. William Dun being called Compeared and being
shown the advertisement produced by Mr. Robison and
signed by the præses and Clerk was asked by the Committee
whether he knows the hand writing in the said advertisement
Declare that he has no answer to give. Being
further asked what is the meaning of his last answer
to wit, he has no answer to give Declares that he does
not chuse to give any further explication Being further
asked if he thinks he ever saw before the above mentioned
paper which was just now shown him and which
lies upon the table before him Declares in the

Negative
William Dun

The following questions were Desired to be put by Mr.
Anderson to the Committee. First whether they heard
Mr. McKinnon pronounce the words mentioned by Mr.
Woodburn in the last page And secondly if they did
whether they thought these words were addreſsed to
the Committee and in a respectful manner

The members of the Committee being asked It was Declared
by Dr. Leechman that he did not hear Mr McKinnon
utter any words and that his manner in departing expreſsed
both Anger and Contempt By Dr. Trail that he heard
these words or words to that purpose and that Mr. McKinnon
seemed to leave the room in anger By Mr. Muirhead
that he heard some such words and that his back was
to Mr. Muirhead he could not judge of his manner but
was struck with the abruptneſs of his departure And
by Mr. Anderson that his answer is the same with Dr
Trails as to the first question and nearly the same as
the Principal's as to the second
Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn were then

asked by the Committee if they had any further
Evidences to examine and if they had any further exculpatory
proof to bring and they both declared in
the negative and in testimony thereof they both subscribed
their names
John Robison
David Woodburn

Mr. Woodburn desired it to be marked that as he understands
hehas been accused of every article which Mr. Robison
has declared in his own exculpation and that Mr. Robison
has been accused of only one article which himself acknowleged
that he Mr. Woodburn cannot help considering
Mr. Robison as a party in that affair and protests against
Mr. Robison's evidence being used against Mr. Woodburn
on that account.
This Committee is adjourned till twelve O Clock to
morrow.
R. Traill, præses
Glasgow College
April 27th 1769

Present Dr. Trail præses Dr. Leechman Mr. Muirhead
& Mr. Anderson
The Committee being duely met according to their

adjournment They received a letter from Mr. John
McKinnon in excuse of his behaviour yesterday which the
Clerk is ordered to keep The members were then all asked
if they had any witneſses further to examine either in
relation to the affair of Mr. Robison and Mr. Woodburn
or in relation to the misbehaviour of any of the
Students during this seſsion of the College according to the
orders of the University Meeting which appointed this
Meeting. Mr. Anderson desired
the above question to be put and he was led to do it by
what it contained in pages sixteenth and seventeenth
of the minutes.

Whereupon the said question was put accordingly
and the Committee Declared that they desired no further
Evidence to be examined with regard to Mr. Robison
and Mr. Woodburn's affair nd as to the last question
that they would take it under consideration.

Mr. Anderson desired it to be marked that he thinks
some more evidences ought to be examined in the affair
of Mr. Robison & Mr. Woodburn.

The Committee Agrees to report what they have
done to the next University Meeting
R. Traill, præses

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Record of the David Woodburn Trial

Document Information

Document ID 702
Title Record of the David Woodburn Trial
Year group 1750-1800
Genre Administrative prose
Year of publication 1769
Place of publication Glasgow, Scotland
Wordcount 25236

Author information: Anderson, Professor John

Author ID 201
Title Professor
Forenames John
Surname Anderson
Gender Male
Year of birth 1726
Place of birth Rosneath, Dunbartonshire, Scotland
Occupation Academic
Father's occupation Clergyman
Education University
Locations where resident Glasgow
Other languages spoken Latin