SCOTS
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Document 1433

BBC Voices Recording: Perth

Author(s): N/A

Copyright holder(s): BBC, SCOTS Project

Audio transcription

F1054 Do you want to go first?
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //No particularly! [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1026 Right, my name's Pam [CENSORED: surname], I live in Scone, I've lived here for twenty-eight years.
F1024 I'm Pam [CENSORED: surname], I live in Scone as well, and I've been here for about twenty-five years now.
F1023 Er, my name's Olive [CENSORED: surname], I've lived in Scone now for forty-two years.
F1027 My name's Yvonne [CENSORED: surname], I live in Perth and I've lived in Perth all my life apart from the twenty years that I lived in Scone.
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 My name's Madge [CENSORED: surname] and I've just been in Scone for one week but up to that point I lived in Perth the rest of my six- fifty-seven years.
F1054 So you just moved this week? //Madge, [inaudible].//
F1025 //Yes, yeah, just last week yeah, a week past on Sunday.// //Mm.//
F1054 //Oh gosh, a real newcomer then!//
F1025 I'm no really a newcomer cause my grandfather and that was here since I was, all my days in Scone, connected with Scone, the football team and such like, you know?
F1054 Very good. Okey-doke. Now is there any word in the diagram that you really started writing down lots for, you think "Ah, I've got a few things to say on that one". //If in doubt, we'll jus-//
F1024 //Drunk.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //"Drunk", good, that's a good place to start. I like that idea, Pam, let's start with "drunk".// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //That's one that I know that we'll all know lots of words for. [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 I I thought of two in particular, erm blootered and guttered were the two I thought of erm. And yeah, er, //used a fair fair amount, yes, aye. [laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh] Never amongst these [inaudible]// //[inaudible].//
F1024 //No no, not at a- not at all, no no, no no, just to describe other people.// [laugh]
F1054 Anybody else?
F1026 //I've got steamin, pissed.//
F1027 //I've got steamin as well, Pam.// Mmhm got pissed as well.
F1025 //Legless.//
F1026 //[laugh] Not that I've been any of these of course! [laugh]// Ehm, but that's about the only ones I've got apart from what Pam said as well.
F1054 What did you have, Olive?
F1023 Well I wrote down, well I we-, I actually just wrote down steaming, sloshed, //erm//
F1024 //Sloshed, aye.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //pissed as well, [laugh] couldn't think of anything else.//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1023 Just more or less what they all said.
F1027 Yeah, that's the same, steamin was my ane one that I would use as well.
F1054 Mmhm.
F1025 And the only other one I said was legless. //That's all.//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1054 //[laugh]// I was interesting in Glasgow and I spoke to folk, ken, and they said there's like a distinction between being comatose, paralytic, rubber-legged. They're all kind of different degrees of drunkenness. //Is there an ultimate drunk word?//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1024 //Oot the game. Oot the game.//
F1027 //Oot there.//
F1024 Yeah, ea- early dark and oot the game. [laugh] That's right, aye. Yeah. //Oot ae the game, mmhm mmhm yeah.//
F1026 //[throat]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1026 Naw I wouldnae have, that's about the only one I'd have thought as well, Pam. For the ultimate, yer oot the game.
F1023 //Fain by, Fallin by?//
F1024 //Mmhm yeah.//
F1026 No, no, no that disnae ring a bell.
F1025 A fall by the wayside no? I can remember that. //Th- that's right, aye, no drunk, no.//
F1026 //Yes, yes.//
F1027 //But that would mean something else, eh?//
F1023 //Well,//
F1054 //Legless?//
F1023 //Ah've heard Eddie use that a lot, legless is//
F1025 //Mmhm oh aye.//
F1023 what he would describe as probably being drunk drunk!
F1027 And if you would see, like if you were in the car and you see somebody oot the car window, you'd maybe say "oh they're absolutely steamin".
F1024 //Yeah, mmhm.//
F1025 //I would mmhm.// //Mmhm.//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1027 //Yeah, that's probably where//
F1023 //Aye, staggering up the road that's what you would say, yer out the game.//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1024 //You're on the pavement [inaudible]. [laugh]//
F1026 //That's it you're on the pavement you've had it you don't remember anything [laugh] at all, that's it.//
F1024 //Eh.//
F1054 //Okay-doke, what else, what else in that section?// Pregnant, amongst women, so words for pregnant?
F1027 Up the spout I've got.
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //Up the duff, bun in the oven.// But, I, obviously I wouldnae really say that, I would just say pregnant. //It's not, but these other sayings are sayings that//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1024 //Yeah, I would say that as well actually.//
F1027 //[inaudible]//
F1026 others might say. //Yeah.//
F1023 //I wrote, I wrote down expecting because that's what I would say, I wouldn't say like//
F1025 //Expecting uh-huh.//
F1023 like, you know,
F1026 Mmhm.
F1023 //"she's got a bun in the oven" or anything like that.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1026 You see, I'm going to be a granny now, I've just discovered that in the past week, so //I would say Tracy is pregnant, I wouldn't say,//
F1027 //[inaudible]//
F1023 //Mmhm.//
F1026 //you know I would say pregnant, that's what I would say.//
F1024 //Up the kite?//
F1025 //Up the kite's another one as well, [laugh] up the kite! [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1054 //That's a good one.// Do you think you'd use different words for pregnant, for, amongst different people, so say you're speakin about yoursel you might say 'I'm pregnant' //or and then you might say somebody else, was up the duff.//
F1023 //Yes.// //No, no. I wouldn't say that.//
F1024 //No, no.//
F1025 //No, no.//
F1026 //No, no.//
F1027 //No, no.//
F1054 //Like if you're a soap opera character? No?//
F1023 //I would just say pregnant or she's expecting. Mmhm.//
F1026 //No, I'd just say pregnant.//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1023 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //Having a baby.//
F1023 //I wouldnae have been, yes.//
F1026 //Expecting's an older word though, isn't it? It's one//
F1027 Uh-huh.
F1023 //Probably.//
F1026 //from maybe when we were pregnant, ye// ye'd have said "I'm expecting".
F1025 I would say it's, expecting //in our days afore pregnant, yeah, nowadays it's pregnant.//
F1023 //Yes, oh yes, nowadays, now it's pregnant.//
F1025 //Uh-huh.//
F1026 //[inaudible]//
F1054 What does Tracy use to describe her pregnancy?
F1026 Pregnant, jist pregnant, yeah.
F1024 [cough]
F1054 Super. Ehm, attractive? //Words for attractive?//
F1026 //Ehm.// //Bonnie.//
F1024 //Bonnie//
F1025 //Bonnie, aye bonnie//
F1027 //Bonnie.//
F1023 //Bonnie.//
F1024 //Mm mmhm.//
F1025 //Pretty?//
F1054 //That's unanimous that one.//
F1025 //Pretty was another one.//
F1026 //Mmhm.// //When I//
F1025 //Pretty, she's pretty.//
F1026 when I was askin Michael, this is one of the young lads //he said fit, she's fit.//
F1024 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //Yeah, bit of all right.//
F1025 [laugh]
F1026 Sexy, gorgeous, [laugh] he came up wi all these, //not me! [laugh]//
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1054 //They're much more imaginative, kids these days, aren't they?//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1026 //But they would say oh she's fit, or he's fit, or-,//
F1024 //Aye.//
F1025 //Mm.//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1026 //but it's not something I would say//
F1027 //No.//
F1026 I would say she's bonnie,
F1023 //Oh aye so would I.//
F1024 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //She's a bonnie [?]one[/?].//
F1026 Mmhm. //Mmhm.//
F1024 //Or fell bonnie.// //Fell bonnie, is one I would have thought.//
F1025 //Aye fell bonnie.//
F1054 What does that mean?
F1024 Fairly, fell, fairly bonnie, fell bonnie, //mmhm, yeah.//
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1024 Yeah, certainly I wou- I would, that's what I would say. She's fell bonnie or //he's fell bonnie even, well//
F1026 //[laugh] [inaudible]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //not normally like that! [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1024 No, no I probably wouldn't say he, no, no, but, no she's fell bonnie. //Oh.//
F1054 //How would you describe a good looking fella?//
F1024 [inhale] //Ehm//
F1023 //He was a bit of alright.//
F1027 //Alright?// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Yes! [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //That's a bit of alright//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[inhale] A hunk, or a handsome hunk.//
F1025 //Eh? A hunk?// //Gorgeous I'd say.//
F1023 //Handsome.//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1023 Aye.
F1025 Hunk, aye, hunk, that, that sounds normal, mmhm.
F1024 Fit's one as well, you would use fit, I think.
F1026 //Now, well that's what//
F1027 //I think we'd maybe use it now but you wouldn't have// //done years a-, yeah, it's kind of a modern description.//
F1026 //I'd say that's not my [inaudible], fit, but, yeah.// //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Do any of your bairns use the expression 'buff'?
F1023 //No.//
F1024 //No, never heard that.//
F1025 //No.//
F1026 //No.//
F1027 //No.//
F1024 //Unless they've got no clothes on.//
F1025 //Clothes on.//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1023 //You're in the buff.//
F1024 //They're in the buff.//
F1025 //In the buff aye mmhm.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //In the buff! [laugh] Yeah.//
F1054 Good. //What aboot//
F1024 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 the opposite of that, really not that attractive?
F1024 Minging. //A minger. [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //A minger?//
F1026 //A minger, yeah, got// //that, bowfin.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //No very bonnie!// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //Bowfin, was another one.//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 //Aye mmhm.//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1025 //Mmhm ugly.// //[laugh] Ugly that's,//
F1023 //Ugly I had.//
F1026 //Pot ugly.// That's another one. They're pot ugly. [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1025 //I would say it now, younger days it would be ugly even [inaudible], would you no?// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Probably I would have said that, mmhm.//
F1026 Dog is another one eh? Sometimes it can be derogatory //for s-//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1026 somebody, you know if they're really not very attractive. //She's a dog or,//
F1025 //A dog mmhm.//
F1026 //whatever.//
F1054 //Does that tend to be a female word?//
F1024 //I would say it is probably uh-huh.//
F1026 //I would, probably, yeah. Yeah.// //For being,//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1027 //From a man describing a female, aye.// //She's a dog. No!//
F1023 //I couldn't see women saying that.//
F1027 No.
F1024 //No, no, no, mmhm.//
F1026 //But if they're unnattractive that's probably what they would say, wouldn't it?// She's a dog. //Not about us of course. [laugh]//
F1024 //No, no, no. [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// No, probably not //a word to describe us.//
F1026 //[cough]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 What about ehm, also in that section, lacking money?
F1023 //Skint.//
F1024 //Skint.//
F1025 //Skint.//
F1026 //Skint.//
F1027 //Skint.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Skint.//
F1024 //[laugh] That was an easy one, skint//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //That was an easy one, skint.//
F1054 //That was an easy one, skint.//
F1023 Hard up. Mmhm mm. //Poor, but skint's//
F1024 //Poor, but skint's// //skint's definitely [inaudible]//
F1023 //def- skint's definitely the//
F1025 //Skint, [?]absolutely[/?].//
F1026 //Skint's definitely.// //Yeah, definitely skint.//
F1025 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1027 //Yes I would say it's very Perth as well to be skint.//
F1054 Could you say that again, sorry, I'm jist no catchin everything cause [inaudible].
F1027 It's a, it's a typical Perth expression. You know "oh I'm skint", mmhm.
F1054 Yes, why is that do you think?
F1027 I don't know, but it's something everybody in the town would say. Mmhm it's not, //it's, you would hear it//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1027 maybe in Perth more than you would hear it in //Dundee say.//
F1026 //Young and old.// //Young and old would say the same.//
F1023 //Yes oh yes.//
F1025 //Mmhm yeah.//
F1027 //Yeah, mmhm.//
F1023 //I would think it-//
F1025 //Mm.//
F1054 //Do you think that's anything to do with the fact that// folk, there's a bigger difference between rich and poor folk here? Or is there varying degrees of, you'd be skint, or you'd be hard up or you'd be completely broke?
F1026 [?]That would be[/?] //skint.//
F1023 //You would be skint mmhm.//
F1027 //You'd be skint mmhm.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1025 //Mmhm.// //Mmhm.//
F1024 //Definitely, just skint means you're//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1024 you haven't, //through, through all the sections of the community//
F1023 //Down to you're, aye down to you're last//
F1025 //[inaudible]// //Aye.//
F1023 //ha'penny [laugh]//
F1024 //skint I would say.//
F1025 Now that's true. //Doon to yer last ha'penny, that's it.//
F1023 //Mm.//
F1024 //Ha'penny, what's a ha'penny? [laugh]//
F1054 //Okay, what about the opposite of that, rich?//
F1023 //Well off?//
F1025 //Mmhm.// //Well off, I've got.//
F1024 //Loaded.// //Loaded.//
F1026 //Minted.//
F1027 //[?]Aye[/?].//
F1024 //Minted.//
F1025 //Minted an loaded.// //[inaudible]//
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //I do- I don't know if that's a Perth word or not but minted you would say they're minted. [laugh]//
F1023 No I, I've never heard that. //I would say well off, yeah,//
F1025 //Well off, I would say mmhm mmhm.//
F1027 //Well off uh-huh.//
F1023 //or loaded.//
F1024 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //Mmhm.// //There's a place in Bridge of Earn, you live in Bridge of Earn did you say?//
F1027 //Mmhm.// //No my friend does.//
F1025 //Oh your friend does, and ehm// //Furcoat Avenue we used to call it. [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 //Go on aye!//
F1025 //Aye, what is the right name? Ehm// //when you jist when you go over the bridge and turn right, Heughfield it//
F1027 //Is that, yes I know, it's Heughfield aye.//
F1025 I forgot, well it was Furcoat Avenue. //That's what we ca-, Furcoat Avenue//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1023 //All well off.//
F1025 //Never called it Heughfield, it was Furcoat Avenue.// //[laugh] Cause they were all well off. [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //Then somebody would say they were fur coat and nae drawers! [laugh]//
F1025 //Probably some of them were like that right enough!//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //That's how they got their money!//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //Oh dear, ehm whit aboot//
F1024 //Aye. [laugh]//
F1054 oh er moody?
F1023 //I didn't have anything for moody, I-//
F1024 //I've got huffy.// //You got huffy [?]there[/?]?//
F1027 //Huffy? Huffy. Yeah, I've got huffy.//
F1026 Stroppy.
F1054 Sorry, just say that again.
F1026 Sulky. Stroppy. Somebody's in a strop or they're in a mood.
F1025 I would say stroppy wh- is mair like kinda arrogant //kinda stroppy, arrogant//
F1027 //Uh-huh yeah bit o an attitude.// //Yeah mmhm.//
F1023 //Huffy more//
F1025 //Ehm that's right but [inaudible]//
F1023 //somebody aye, huff.//
F1027 //Huffy definitely if you're, if you're in a huff.// //Or you've got the hump!//
F1023 //Aye you've taken a,//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1023 //aye you've taken, aye you've taken the hump! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 What does that mean?
F1027 The same thing just as yer in a mood, a sulk. //Something like that.//
F1025 //Mmhm.// //Mmhm aye.//
F1023 //Takin the [?]pet[/?] [laugh] takin the [?]pet[/?]// //Aye I've heard that.//
F1024 //Takin the pet.//
F1026 //I haven't heard that one.//
F1023 Mmhm mmhm she's aw- she's away in the huff cause she's, you know, takin the pet, you know, she's not happy with whatever's //goin on or something.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Mm.//
F1024 //Aye.//
F1023 //Normally.//
F1027 //Normally applied to the female population then?// //As if men dinnae go in the huff? [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //They're in the huff aw the time! [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]// //[cough]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //Ye dinnae ken whit's normal wi them.// //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[cough]//
F1054 //Wh- what aboot er words for insane?//
F1026 //Mad.//
F1027 //Nuts.//
F1023 //Daft.//
F1024 //Daft.//
F1025 //Daft.//
F1026 //Daft.//
F1054 //Just if you could say that in turn// //Try and no speak over the top of one another cause I'm no catchin everything unfortunately.//
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //Right sorry, sorry.// //Sorry what was that one again?//
F1027 //Insane.//
F1054 //That was insane.//
F1026 Well I'd say mad. Bonkers. Nuts. That's about the only three I could think of that I would personally say if I was talking about somebody who's, well like our friend's //a psychiatric nurse, and we//
F1024 //[laugh]// //That's right aye, yeah.//
F1026 //call her a nutter nurse [laugh] so// yeah.[throat]
F1054 And i- is there different ways like nuts to be quite affectionate? And ehm totally no no right would be something else, you know?
F1026 I suppose you could say affectionately somebody's nuts, meaning that they're //they're funny or but yeah.//
F1027 //I think it's the tone you say it in.//
F1026 Yeah, probably the way that you say it. //You could say oh she's nuts, but she's funny.//
F1027 //Yeah, yeah, or you, or you can use a// a phrase like ehm "a sandwich short of a picnic", //you know, something like that, "not the shipe- the sharpest knife in the drawer", something like that.//
F1025 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1027 //But again these are sort o// //terms rather than words.//
F1026 //Than words.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //Aye that's fine, expressions are fine too.//
F1023 //Da- daft was what I said, yes, daft or mad.//
F1025 //Daft was what you said, daft, daft wha- um.// //Mmhm daft.//
F1023 //Mmhm.//
F1024 //Mmhm.// Is flaky not another one, flaky's one that I would hear used a fair bit. //No?//
F1023 //I've never heard that.//
F1025 //No, never heard that one Pam.//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //That's maybe just in the police station.//
F1027 //That'll be the police.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh] We're all flaky!//
F1025 //[laugh] [inaudible]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1024 Flaky, I don't know if maybe that's an Edinburgh one then. //I stayed in Edinburgh for a wee-//
F1025 //Oh right.//
F1027 //Flaky to me// sounds like it's a bit iffy. //You know like//
F1026 //It's no a word// //it's not a word I would have//
F1023 //No I don't,//
F1024 //No,//
F1025 //No [inaudible].// //[laugh]//
F1023 //no. [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //I just think of flaky pastry, when I think of flaky! [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1024 //Food again, you're on this diet! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh] That's what it is!//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[inaudible] Ehm what about, er// insane, attractive, pregnant [inaudible], //left-handed?//
F1025 //Mm.// //Kippie-handed.//
F1027 //Kippie-handed? I've got that as well.// //Mmhm.//
F1025 //Kippie-handed.//
F1054 //Tell me aboot that.//
F1025 //Just, it's always been kippie-handed, somebody that's left handed, we've always said they're kippie-handed.//
F1027 //Yeah.// //I don't know where it came from either, my parents used it, that's why I use it.//
F1025 //Don't know where it came from but that's what we, mmhm, kippie-handed's// //always been//
F1027 //Mmhm yeah.//
F1054 //Why did your parents use that?//
F1027 I've no idea, my brother was left, well, is left-handed so //he was always referred to as, kippie-handed.//
F1025 //kippie-handed.// //You s-//
F1027 //Mmhm, but I've no idea where it came from.//
F1023 //No.//
F1025 //Do you say, Olive, kippie-handed?//
F1023 I wasn't sure, an I ru- didn't really know wha- what an I asked Jim an he said he had always called it cack-handed.
F1026 Yeah, I've heard that one as //well.//
F1023 //Eh, he, right away, he came out he says oh anybody left handed's cack-handed.//
F1024 //Aye?//
F1023 //But he's Perth as well, born and bred, but where it came from, no idea.//
F1025 //Mmhm uh-huh.//
F1023 [inhale]
F1024 I always thought cack-handed meant that you were a bit ehm not very good with your hands, you broke stuff or you were //clumsy, I always thought of//
F1023 //Yes aye.// //Aye, handed.//
F1024 //as cack-handed.//
F1025 Couldnae catch a ball. //Aye.//
F1023 //No well,//
F1024 //That's right.//
F1026 //Aye.// //That's me.//
F1023 //as soon as I asked him about left-handed,//
F1027 //Coordination.//
F1023 //he said cack-handed, but I don't know.//
F1025 //Mm.//
F1026 //[laugh] I'm cack-handed.//
F1023 //I don't know.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Interesting. Yeah, the folk over in Pitlochry said ehm what you said as well //kippie-handed, yeah, but ehm I'd never heard it anywhere else.//
F1023 //Kippie-handed.//
F1025 //Kippie-handed. Uh-huh.//
F1027 //Kippie-handed.//
F1023 //I must admit//
F1025 //Uh-huh.//
F1026 //It must be. [throat]//
F1054 //Maybe it's a Perth thing.//
F1023 //I've never heard of kippie-handed either and I I was born and brought up in Perth//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1027 //Mmhm.// //I mean, now I don't think I would use it,//
F1023 //till I moved to Scone.//
F1027 but when I was trying to think of a s- a sayin //you know that's,//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //Iwou- I would still use it, I think.//
F1027 //would you?// //Uh-huh.//
F1023 //Well I would just say left-handed.//
F1025 //But normally you would say some-, or your left, my grandaughter is left-handed but// //sometimes we would say kippie tae her, aye you're kippie just,//
F1027 //Mm Mmhm.//
F1025 [cough] no on, I mean I don't think you have an occasion to use it, //eh you know, but it's kippie I would say.//
F1054 //Mmhm.// //Do you think there's anything negative associated//
F1025 //Mm.//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1054 with that?
F1025 //Mm no.//
F1027 //Not now, but I think there was.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1027 Maybe not when we were children but our parents, you know because it, like in school they were //tried to//
F1054 //Oh aye, yeah.// //Mm.//
F1025 //Yeah.//
F1027 //you know write wi their other hand and all that, so,// I think it was derogatory then, but it, I don't think it matters now.
F1024 //I I can remember at primary school in Edinburgh, erm, actually been taught to write with their right hand rather than using their left hand and gettin into bother for using their left hand,//
F1025 //[cough] Mmhm.//
F1024 which seemed an awful shame because it was //hard enough at primary school without//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1024 //changin hands.//
F1025 //[CENSORED: forename] [CENSORED: surname] was at the northern district// you know, before it was changed to Balhousie, eh he used to //hit them aboot, he was really bad//
F1027 //That's right.//
F1025 if anybody was left-handed, he used to think you were a wee bit daft [inhale] //if you were kippie-handed, left-handed,//
F1027 //Uh-huh yeah.//
F1025 you know, and I think that's what they tried to //knock it out of kids like, you know, an//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //I think the teachers long ago def-, well//
F1025 //the-// //mmhm.//
F1023 //even before, I, like when we were at school,// //previous generation I think they would get slapped with the ruler an//
F1027 //Mmhm.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //and things like that, ru-, eh, ruler over the knuckles just to stop.//
F1025 //Aye mmhm.// //Aye, mmhm.//
F1023 //Make them write wi their right hand.// //I don't know why they they had a thing against//
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1023 left-handedness but as you say maybe it was associated with them being //maybe not so clever or something.//
F1025 //Funnily enough, like you're saying that like,//
F1054 //Not as clever?//
F1025 the violin, ma grandaughter's left-handed //but you can't play the violin left-handed so she's got to get used to//
F1054 //No, left-handed.//
F1023 //Mmhm the right hand mmhm.//
F1025 //eh wi the right hand wi the violin,// you know, there's another wee bit [inaudible].
F1054 Yeah that's good ehm let's see now, //I think we've covered everything on that one section, yep.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Let's move onto the next one, shall we go to the bottom right, inside and outside? //Words for,//
F1027 //Mmhm//
F1054 er shall we start with Pam, to rain lightly?
F1024 [click] [inhale] I've got drizzle or spitting //or//
F1023 //That's what I've got.//
F1024 That's what I would say if it was raining lightly, jist drizzling.
F1026 No I would say the same, I've got drizzle or spi- or spittin rain, exactly the same. I wouldn't, couldn't think of anything else I would say.
F1023 Definitely drizzle I wouldn't //I wouldn't say anything else, I would just come in and say it's, you know, it's drizzling.//
F1027 //Drizzling.//
F1023 Mmhm.
F1027 Yeah, same for me, drizzle, and I've put a wee note next to it, if I was describing the day I would probably call it a dreich day, because it's drizzlin. //But.//
F1054 //Mmhm mmhm.// //Very Scottish mmhm.//
F1027 //That's a Scottish word.//
F1025 It's spittin, I've got spittin. //[inaudible] [inhale]//
F1054 //What about to rain heavily, Madge?//
F1025 Eh pour, pour or peltin. Peltin wi rain. //Mm or pourin wi rain mm.//
F1026 //Lashing, lashing.// The rain lashing against the window.
F1024 Or tippin it down, //tippin it down.//
F1027 //Tippin it down that's right.// //Mmhm you can hear it tippin it.//
F1024 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //I, I come in and I'll say, you know, it's lashing rain outside or//
F1027 //[inaudible]// //Bucketing.//
F1023 //I've even said bucketing rain, you know.//
F1024 //Bucketing.//
F1023 //Bucketing rain, I've said that. I've also said teeming rain, but I take that from my English side//
F1025 //Aye that's right, [inaudible].// //[laugh]//
F1023 //of the family! [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh] [cough]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[inhale] cause my father//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1023 //was Cornish so I often say teeming rain, but that's not, that's not from up here.//
F1025 //[cough]//
F1023 [laugh]
F1027 Yeah. I would say the same, bucketin, //something like that.//
F1054 //Mm.// Mmhm. That's interesting, I actually say tuimin, that's what we say back home. //It's like teeming but without the [inaudible] pronunciation.//
F1023 //Aye, teeming yes, teeming.// An English expression.
F1027 //You say?//
F1054 //Yeah.// Tuimin.
F1026 Toomin?
F1023 //Same.//
F1025 //Could be the Norwegian.//
F1027 //Yeah it's very,//
F1054 //Tu- tuimin yeah.// //Yeah.//
F1023 //Yeah.//
F1025 //Mm mm mm.//
F1027 //very the same but a lot of your words are like that, aren't they, [inaudible].//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Funny words. [click] Ehm,// what aboot er er er //toilet, this is a good one.//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //Aye.//
F1023 //I just can't,//
F1025 //[laugh] [inhale]//
F1026 //What's that?//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //Well, I've got lavvie, [laugh]// or cludgie. Or the bog. [laugh]
F1054 And, does that apply to like indoor and outdoor toilets? //Tell me about that.//
F1025 //Mmhm [inhale]// Well, I I mean in in the days gone by when the toilet was at the foot of the garden, I can //remember that quite, it was the cludgie I would say,//
F1023 //Yes so do I.//
F1025 //more so wi that or the bog.//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1025 [inhale] but lavatory is a, I would say, mm you'd call it the lavvie, like instead of the bathroom, [inhale] because most people dinna have a bath in they days, they jist, they were lucky if they had an inside toilet, you know, //when they come out, dry toilet//
F1026 //It was a dry toilet doon at the bottom of the garden,// //with newspaper.//
F1025 //toilet doon the bottom of the garden, aye, mmhm.//
F1054 //And what// what was it like when you got the toilet inside?
F1025 Well I, I always had a toilet [laugh] inside right enough, but I'm goin when I was at Sconieburn or doon at Errol or some o these places, eh they used to have the newspaper //cut intae wee squares and there's string through it an, aye, an you jist//
F1027 //Uh-huh.//
F1025 [inhale] //had the Sunday paper on yer backside, or [laugh] or the//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 [laugh] you know but eh it was pretty stinky, wisn't it? //Aye.//
F1026 //Yeah, especially in the summertime.// It was ehm my granny and granpa stayed in Almondbank, //[inhale] so we used to go to this wee cottage an//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1026 down the bottom of the garden was the //toilet,//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1026 but it wisnae too bad in that he had an aviary, so you could watch all these //bonnie birds, [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1026 when you went to this dry toilet, but like you say it was the //newspaper on the string and i- quite smelly in the summer,//
F1025 //That's right, aye. Mmhm.// //Wonderful mid-//
F1026 //flies and whatever.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //good middens, and you know midden// //um and it//
F1023 //Good rhubarb!//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 aw used to get bunged into the midden! [laugh] //My God, we were healthy in they days wi oor vegetables! [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[cough]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[throat]//
F1027 //Yeah, I've just got toilet, loo,// lavvy.
F1025 [laugh] [throat]
F1027 We had a toilet on the stair in our //first house, it was//
F1025 //Aye that, mm, aye.// //I forgot [inaudible]//
F1054 //How did that work?//
F1027 Well it I sup- presume it was between the two top flats cause there was one down the stair for the two bottom flats. I was only five when we moved from there so I cannae really remember much about it apart from //I remember eh that's where it was.//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1027 And then, you know, our next house it was like a proper bathroom it had, but //um.//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1027 The only inconvenience I would think was because there was no bathroom, //it was havin the bath that was more of the inconvenience than not//
F1025 //Mmhm mm.//
F1027 havin a toilet.
F1054 Mmhm.
F1027 Because I can remember we used to go the swimming baths and get a bath in the swimming //baths when we were wee.//
F1025 //Aye that was, that was mmhm.// Mmhm.
F1027 An it was great cause there were great big huge //enormous baths and you could have as much hot water as you liked! [laugh]//
F1025 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1054 //[laugh].//
F1024 //To yourself?//
F1025 //[cough]//
F1027 //So I can remember that.// //To yourself, I've no had to share it with my mum.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[cough]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 //No I just said loo and toilet,//
F1054 //Olive?//
F1023 an lavvie, I mean I I've always ha- like been brought up with a bathroom, as such, but I used to hear ma granny speak about, you know, like where her parents were an i- they had an out-, you know, a toilet //down at the bottom of the garden.//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1023 My husband eh he until he got married had always had an outside toilet, cause where he lived in Scone eh his mother only had a toilet at the bottom of the stairs although it flushed, it wasn't a //dry toilet.//
F1025 //Aye.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //But I mean they used to just talk about "we're goin to the lavvie".//
F1025 Mmhm.
F1023 But I mean it was cold in the winter only lit with a wee paraffin //lamp,//
F1026 //Mm.//
F1023 an it was quite a hike if you had been out drinkin the night before, //ye'd tae get up in the middle of the night to go down the stairs tae the toilet! [laugh]//
F1025 //That's right.//
F1026 //[cough]//
F1023 It was a bit of a thing but he didn't know what it was to have a //an actual indoor toilet until he actually got married.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 Did ye no have a chanty under the bed?
F1023 I think //bu-I think Hilda, I think, I think may- Hilda did give us a chanty, but I can't remember now, but I mean,//
F1025 //I've got chanties now [inaudible].//
F1027 //Mmhm mm.//
F1023 ehm. an the- the thing is, his mum had the chance to actually go to a house with a, you know, like a council house in the village and she refused point black to move where, from where she was staying so she never knew all her life till she died, ehm she didn't have running wa-, you know, she didn't have hot water in her house, and she didn't have a toilet or a bath.
F1026 How long ago was that //since//
F1023 //She died in nineteen eighty.// //And she, that's, she died in nineteen eighty, at eighty-two.//
F1024 //No.//
F1025 //That's not that long, I know.//
F1026 //I mean that's not that long ago.//
F1027 //No.//
F1023 She died the year Grant was born, that's right eighty, aye eighty, and she was eighty-two and she never had a bathroom in her life. And she didn't have hot water. She'd only //like cold water tap,//
F1027 //Was it freezin?// //Was it freezin?//
F1023 //and then latter, in latter years she had a geyser.//
F1027 Aye.
F1023 And so when Ed-, we got married in nineteen sixty-three, and till then, well Eddie went to do his National Service, so obviously he had toilet facilities, you know, when he was away in Germany and things like that. But I mean until he got married in sixty-three he hadn't had a toilet either. //Cause he was brought up like obviously at home with his mum.//
F1027 //Aye.//
F1025 //I could remember when we first,//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Ha-// //no, no carry on.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //sorry er, the first flat that we ever// bought in, in [?]McQuivan[/?]'s buildings //no [?]McQuivan[/?]//
F1026 //Oh right that,// //that's the Shore Road. [laugh]//
F1025 //buildin's the same road, but it's the Shore Road, ehm,// an Barker's buildings on Milne Street. An it was like that, share toilet. //But//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //the old guy next door had been in the hospital all the time we were there//
F1054 //[cough]//
F1025 an then //had bought the flat next door as well, and there was an ol-, you know, with the bed recess?//
F1027 //Uh-huh.//
F1025 And I made, I worked in a plumbers' merchants at the time an made a bathroom, a bathroom, wi s- eh chrome pipes oh it was great. cause I worked in a plumbers' merchants! [laugh] An we made the recess //a bathroom between the two flats like, you know?//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Mm mm.//
F1025 //The recess of one of the houses but// //it was as you say it was absolutely freezin.//
F1023 //I// //know.//
F1025 //When you came up at night// an then you were aw cosy in the flat an ye had tae away run doon the middle o these stairs like, you know? //[inhale] But it was a flush toilet like, aye aye.//
F1023 //Aye Eddie's mum had a flush toilet,//
F1027 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1023 //too, an it was their own toilet and they didn't have to share,//
F1025 //Aye.// //Mm mmhm.//
F1023 //[inhale] but I mean it was very basic, I mean, it was just like at the bottom of the stairs an like an old-fashioned like.//
F1026 //The chain?//
F1023 //A- and the coal, it would be originally a part of a coal cellar and it had just been converted tae a toilet.//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1027 //Mmhm//
F1023 //See,//
F1025 //I mean you'd think, I mean// //they survived eh? Yeah.//
F1023 //aye oh aye they did aye.// Mmhm. //Aye.//
F1025 //The mod cons nowadays.//
F1054 Speakin o mod cons, Pam, do you think your your kids use different for the smallest room in the house?
F1024 [tut] No, I think they're probably just the same, the same sort of words that we use, ehm, I- they wouldn't know what an outside toilet was apart from Guide camp, Scout camp, I think. //But eh//
F1054 //Mm.//
F1024 no it's just the loo. The bogs. Bogs that's what the school toilets were //called the bogs! [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 //I think most [inaudible] people would definitely say loo.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 Aye.
F1023 //Or//
F1027 //Or just the toilet.// //Amy would say "I'm,//
F1023 //just going to the toilet,// //"I'm going to the toilet."//
F1025 //I don't know about the northern district,//
F1027 //I'm just going to the toilet."// //No,//
F1025 //the toilets were still outside, I think they are still outside.// //They've been closed, have they?//
F1027 //they've been closed for years, aye.// //Yeah, there's inside now, aye.//
F1025 //Are they inside now? Oh they're inside now.// //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1054 //Cause I think there's a- some// tradition, you know, to call it bathroom, //or restroom, now fae American//
F1027 //Mmhm.// //Aye.//
F1054 //programmes as well.// //Maybe.//
F1025 //No, I wouldnae say these.// //No, I wouldn't say.//
F1023 //I wouldnae say I was going to the bath,//
F1054 //It's not as common as far as Perth?//
F1023 //I would say I was going to the toilet, no I wouldnae.//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1026 //Or the powder room or something, but they are Americans.//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1023 //Aye, no.//
F1025 //I see you've put bathroom, you say restroom.//
F1026 //That's a bit posh for here I think. [laugh]//
F1023 //Neither would I, I would say I'm going to the bathroom, or something.//
F1025 //No, no.//
F1027 But if I was sending somebody to get something out of the cupboard there, I would say it's in the bathroom cupboard. //I wouldn't say it's in the toilet cupboard.//
F1023 //No I// //would say the bathroom too, aye,//
F1024 //[cough]//
F1025 //No, bathroom, aye.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //that's.//
F1054 //Interestin.// //And yet, what fascinating is toilet//
F1023 //Aye.//
F1025 //Aye.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[inaudible] trying, maybe cover some other stuff! [laugh]// What about running water smaller than a river?
F1023 //A burn, a burn, yes.//
F1025 //Burn.//
F1026 //Yes.//
F1027 //Burn, yes.// //Burn.//
F1024 //Burn, stream, ditch,//
F1026 //Burn.//
F1024 stream or a ditch aye.
F1025 Mmhm.
F1026 //A ditch is no really a runnin,//
F1027 //Water.//
F1026 //well I mean it is, yeah yeah.//
F1054 //It could be in that category, couldn't it?//
F1025 //That's true.//
F1026 //But I'd say a burn.//
F1023 //Burn definitely around this area, I think.//
F1024 //Burn, yeah.//
F1054 //Tell me about this// tell me a wee story about being at a burn, or something jist a wee wee quick story, I mean you've got prime burn country //here, beautiful.//
F1023 //Yes, well my husband used to guddle//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //There's Scone burn for a start.// //Trout, that's right.//
F1023 //trout. He guddle-, he's guddled all of his life in Scone burn,//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1023 an he's done it, well since he was a wee lad. Eh he would still do it yet if he got the chance. [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1024 //That's why there's no trout in the Scone burn now, right. [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //Maybe that's it. [laugh]//
F1023 //He often, he often says that he often//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1023 //looks and thinks that there isn't the trout in it//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1023 that there used to be, I mean he used to be able to, I think the record between him and his pal was like forty-something when they did it in their lunch hour one day when they were apprentices //was it Alan [CENSORED: surname].//
F1026 //That's a lot.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //But I don't think you could get anything like that now,//
F1026 //No.//
F1023 no. //Oh yes.//
F1027 //I remember he took Amy once when she was tiny,// //she came car- carryin this trout//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //aw the way up to [?]Ally[/?]// //[laugh] [inaudible].//
F1023 //Aye, oh aye Eddie's a// you know, all his life because he was born and brought up in the village.
F1054 Tell us what guddlin involves, or what
F1023 Oh well you have. [laugh] //[inhale]//
F1054 //Tell me, guddlin is?//
F1023 Guddling is ehm oh ye have tae sort of get into the burn and then with your fingers, ye have tae very gently go under the stones mostly at the side, where there is a lot of green and everything, where the trout hide [inhale] and you've to go in and then you've basically just go to //tickle them out I think is the expression, and you've got tae be able to//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 to catch it. //Ehm,//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //that's it.//
F1054 //That must be quite a skill.//
F1024 [tut] Yeah I, I well I stayed in Dingwall for a couple of years, and it was actually the minister in Dingwall that taught me how to guddle //fish. [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 Ehm it was quite amazing. Ehm bu- bu- it was great fun, great fun, but that was not actually gettin into the burn, //ehm it was lying alongside the bank.//
F1023 //Well,// //[inaudible]//
F1024 //And just lying there and the hand going in, and you feel the fish gently and it's// //just like dazing it,//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1024 just, just tickling it gently, rubbing it gently, dazing it [inhale] and then wheech an throwing it onto the bank. //Yeah, it's good fun.//
F1026 //I would never have had the patience to// //do that. In fact I used to go with//
F1023 //No.//
F1027 //No, me neither.//
F1026 ma brother, he used to go to the burn an to go fishing and I'd cry until I got to go as well. Cause I was a spoilt wee brat. [inhale] //And,//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1026 when we got there all I'd do was get a row for speakin //all the time it would be "Shut up!"//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[cough]//
F1026 //"Shut up! You're frightenin the fish, be quiet! Shut up!" cause that's all I did.// //[inhale]//
F1027 //I remember getting an awful row in Perth for being in the Craigie burn,// at the South Inch, //from my parents. We'd been playing on the Inch in Perth,//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 [inhale] and goin home and "What have you been doin? You're soakin." Been in the burn and oh went mad cause at that time, all the open toilets went in //to the burn, yeah.//
F1026 //Oh serious?//
F1027 And of course I must have been stinkin //from, [laugh] so I never did it again.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 I can mind going in the burn in the North Inch ehm an gettin the golf balls //[laugh]//
F1026 //Oh yeah!// //[telephone rings]Oh no the phone!//
F1025 //We used to go in there fae the school,// //and eh aye, we sold them.//
F1026 //Did you sell them? [?]Good[/?]// //[telephone ringing]//
F1025 //Uh-huh [?]We sold them all.[/?]//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1023 //Quite right, quite right!//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1025 //Aye it's//
F1054 //Better pause it for a second until Pam gets sorted.//
F1023 A settee. Settee?
F1027 Couch.
F1025 //Couch.//
F1054 //Right.//
F1024 Settee.
F1026 I would say settee now but when I was younger I would have said the couch. But settee's a more modern word. //Like,//
F1024 //Yeah, it is.//
F1027 //I would say a sofa now probably.//
F1026 like lounge is a modern word instead of saying your [inhale] you know, go through to the living room, you would now say go through to the lounge and sit on the settee, where it was go though an the couch is [laugh] you know? I mean it's just
F1027 Yeah.
F1026 modern words and old words. An I think because you listen to things on the TV, they say settee don't they? They don't talk about couches.
F1025 Nine times out of ten //probably be a bed settee the couch anyway,//
F1026 //Mm, aye.// //Aye.//
F1025 //[laugh] you know?// //in the days go-.//
F1026 //In fact sofa's a word they say now// //cause//
F1025 //Aye sofa//
F1027 //Yeah.// //I would say so.//
F1026 //when I was trying to think of a word for this, the adverts// //were on the TV and it was all about sofas,//
F1025 //Mm.//
F1027 //Mm.//
F1026 and sofa isn't a word I would say.
F1023 No I wouldn't say sofa either. //Just settee, I've always just thought settee.//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Mm mm.
F1027 Well it was definitely the couch in our house. //[throat]//
F1026 //Was it, but settee now?// //[inaudible] couch.//
F1027 //[throat] No I would say a sofa now.// No I would probably say a sofa. //Yeah.//
F1026 //Would you?//
F1054 [?]It really[/?] seems to vary by family, //this wan,//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 totally different and it's //like cou- se- set- settee, couch.//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1027 It's funny, if I was talkin about the se- settee, couch, sofa in the back sitting room, the one that Amy lies on permanently, I would call it the settee, //or the couch, but if I am talkin about the one in my front room I would call it the sofa.//
F1054 //Mmhm.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //Ooh that sounds so posh!//
F1027 //I probably would.// //So that must be the posh version! [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[?]Oh posh[/?].//
F1023 //See, but [inaudible]//
F1027 //I probably would though.//
F1023 //where I lived, our living room was quite small so we only had individual//
F1025 //In the good room!//
F1026 //Aye.//
F1023 chairs when I was young, we didn't actually ever have a settee or a couch, well until I met Eddie, and well his mum, she had a bed-settee.
F1025 //Aye that's//
F1027 //Okay.//
F1023 //Because she lived on the bed-settee, they needed//
F1025 //[inaudible].//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1023 the bed, you know they needed that. It's only since I'd been married we've had a settee, and I just call it a settee, I would never thought of couch.
F1025 Couch aye.
F1023 See that's maybe like going back when I was wee but we were never I never had a couch, when //I was wee, it was always individual chairs we had.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1054 What would Amy call the seat?
F1027 [tut] Eh the settee probably, mmhm. //Yeah.//
F1054 //Mm.// [inhale] Good, ehm what aboot er what about the room itself? //Where you watch th-.//
F1023 //A main room?// I ca- well if the TV's in it, I call it the living room.
F1024 Sitting room.
F1026 The lounge.
F1027 Living room or front room.
F1025 Living room. //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Totally different// //answers there then.//
F1023 //See,//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1023 I don't have a television in ma lounge. [laugh] //So I've got a living room with the television//
F1027 //[?]Aye that's true.[/?]// //Yeah.//
F1023 //and a front room, what I call a front room it's my lounge but I have a living room.//
F1054 An so ye kinda keep the front room for special occasions?
F1023 //Aye ye- yeah.//
F1027 //That's for the minister [inaudible].// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Aye it's for the minister, [inaudible] yes yes.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1023 //Special occasions. It's the good room.//
F1024 //That's right.//
F1025 //The good room, the good room. [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Very rarely used as my husband says, it's like for// //eh Christmas and New Year or when we've got visitors which is//
F1025 //Aye.// //Aye.//
F1023 //you know, not ve-, or// entertain or something, not very often not used very often. So we're mostly in the living room.
F1054 Mmhm.
F1024 I suppose living room's where you all lived, //really which is why it's called that really.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Mmhm.// Probably where the fire goes on //as well when we were kids.//
F1023 //Oh aye.// //It might, I mean we only had a living room.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //You know, if you, if you had a front room// //the fire was never on there anyway.//
F1023 //Mmhm.// //We only, see at ho-, when I was//
F1027 //Mmhm//
F1023 wee we only had the living //room. We had no other room, it was just the living we, we//
F1027 //Uh-huh, well so did we, yeah, aye.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //lived in it and that was it. The fire was on an// //that was it.//
F1054 //Aye,// //[inaudible] Mm let's see now,//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1054 narrow walkway between or alongside buildings?
F1024 [inhale] I have to say that I've not really lived in an area where there have been buildings with the narrow walkways between them, ehm, but if I was referring to it at all, it would probably be a close. But I always thought that was a Dundee word.
F1026 //No I've always said close.//
F1027 //No, I would say// //a close.//
F1026 //I've always said close as well.//
F1025 Mmhm.
F1026 I mean there's allleyways an
F1027 Or vennel.
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //Yeah, but vennel's a Perth word because ye talk about,// //it is like, it has got a name like ehm//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1027 //Like the Cutlog Lane.//
F1026 Cutlog Vennel, yeah.
F1025 Oh no so much //[inaudible]//
F1026 //So I mean there's quite a few of them in Perth and they actually have names.//
F1025 wider.
F1026 //Ehm but I would have said a close, I'd have said,//
F1027 //[inaudible]//
F1026 you know, "I'll meet you at the end o that close", //[laugh] or whatever!//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1023 Close sometimes is associated with like,
F1026 Tenement buildings.
F1023 ten- exactly. Aye like a building with, where you //"I'll meet you at the close", you know, goin up the//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1026 //Aye.// //Yeah.//
F1023 //close and they lived upstairs. That's Glasgow, you see, where they had tenement buildings//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 And they went in the close. To me it's like a ven- I would say that [inhale] narrow walkway between buildings to me is a vennel. //Like//
F1027 //Yeah, a ven-//
F1023 nicking up between, you know, where you park in the Canal Street now, and ye go up to the side of Tesco's, //that's a vennel, that's a close to me or a narrow walkway between buildings.//
F1025 //Mmhm aye.//
F1027 Aye.
F1023 That to me is a vennel.
F1027 Yeah, a vennel or a close. //But a close//
F1026 //To me I think that's a Perth word,// //because it's not a word I'd heard until I came to Perth//
F1054 //Ah.//
F1026 vennel. //I mean there's a vennel outside o McEwen's, there's//
F1027 //Must be vennels ither// //Aye. Yes.//
F1023 //Lots of vennels.//
F1026 //like Baxters Vennel, and there's Cutlog Vennel.// //Lots of,//
F1027 //But there must be a lot of other towns that have vennels.// //I'll tell you there's, Edinburgh does because it's got Fishers Vennel and//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1027 ehm //in the old town there's lots of these//
F1025 //That's in the old// //town.//
F1026 //There's a Fleshers Vennel.//
F1027 //mmhm.// //Mmhm yeah, there's Fleshers//
F1023 //Oh yes.// //They've got Cutlog Vennel,//
F1027 //mmhm.//
F1023 //eh Kirkside's a vennel.//
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //Yeah.// //[laugh]//
F1025 //There's a lot of vennels in Perth, aye.// //Really when ye s- really start to think//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1025 is vennel a word that you would use yourself? //No?//
F1054 //No really, eh lane.//
F1025 //Lane, a close or a vennel I would say.//
F1026 //That's posh that,// //lane.//
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1025 //Mmhm mmhm you're posh.// //"We're Inverness."//
F1023 //That's posh. [laugh]//
F1027 //Yeah.//
F1025 //Like, [laugh] no I would say close or vennel.//
F1054 //[laugh] Yeah, uh oh well.// Yeah, okay ehm let's do the next set of stuff, ehm mother? //Word-//
F1023 //What what you, what I call my mother?// //I just called her mum.//
F1054 //Uh-huh.//
F1023 //[inhale] Definitely mum.//
F1025 //Mum.//
F1027 //Mum.//
F1024 Mum.
F1026 Mum.
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Totally unanimous, good!// //Grandma, grandmother?//
F1023 //I//
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1023 //call her granny.//
F1026 //Granny.//
F1024 Granny.
F1023 Granny.
F1027 Granny.
F1025 Granny.
F1024 //Or or or nana.//
F1054 //I never get a unanimous verdict wi that.// //Ah! I knew there'd be something.//
F1023 //No, no I never called my//
F1024 //Nana.//
F1026 //No, no!//
F1027 //No, no!//
F1023 //granny that.//
F1024 //My mum's,// //yo- the female side of it, like my mum's mum's the nana.//
F1027 //Aye to differentiate mmhm.//
F1024 And my mum's a nana, whereas eh it's granny for the the male side //of it.//
F1027 //My family was the opposite.// //It's my dad's mum that was my nana.//
F1024 //Mm right.//
F1027 And all, because she came from Northumberland, they never had grannies they were all nanas.
F1054 Oh?
F1026 //Oh.//
F1027 //Ye'd get nana [CENSORED: surname] and nana somebody else.// //But, there wis nae any grannies then as she//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1027 sort o stuck to the nana idea.
F1054 Interesting. What about grandfather?
F1023 I called him grandad.
F1024 //Grandad.//
F1026 //Papa.// Papa.
F1027 Grandad.
F1025 Gramp. //Gramp.//
F1054 //Okay, so you've ehm gramp?//
F1025 Gramp, G-R-A-M-P, gramp.
F1054 Okay, Madge, any reason for that cause everybody else is saying //grandad.//
F1025 //I just// always he got gramp, gramp [CENSORED: surname] that was it [laugh] just got gramp. //Mm .//
F1054 //Again it's really personal for families, isn't it?//
F1026 Well I think it is, because I mean, my grandad was papa, an my kids called like my dad, papa, an Mark will be called //papa, when Tracy and Steven have theirs, it's just//
F1025 //Aye. Mmhm mmhm.// //family thing.//
F1026 //it must just be a family thing.// Just like granny or nana, whatever it is that you've you've said, I'll be granny. //[laugh]//
F1025 //Aye [inaudible].//
F1054 //How do you feel about that?// //Is this your,//
F1026 //Great! [laugh]// I've started knittin. //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[cough]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //is this your first grandchild?//
F1026 Yeah. So we're lookin forward to it. //We've got ages to go yet! [laugh]//
F1023 //When's it//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1023 //due?//
F1026 //I've been through the internet looking for prams and everything as well.// Great! [laugh]
F1054 When's it due?
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //No till aboot October, but// //got ages yet!//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 I'll have loads of stuff. //I'll have knitted loads//
F1054 //Yeah.//
F1026 knittin with this two-ply wool.
F1023 Oh it's murder.
F1026 I've knitted one side at the moment an it's that size. //It would fit a doll, [laugh] it's tiny!//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 Are there any like Perth traditions aroond babies or child, //the rearing, anything like that?//
F1024 //Eh//
F1054 Nothing unique?
F1026 Don't think so, cause you don't have baby showers and things here like you do in America, there's nothing like that, is there? Just grannies go mad I suppose that's all. //[laugh]//
F1023 //We've even stopped, [?]well[/?],// well we used to do shows of like wedding presents. I never hear of anybody //having that now.//
F1026 //No.//
F1023 //I think that seems to have died a death.//
F1024 //Um yeah.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1023 You know when a bride was getting married she would show all her wedding presents. //I don't hear of anybody doing that now.//
F1026 //But then lots of//
F1027 //No, no I never hear of anyone doing that.//
F1026 //couples live together now so they have//
F1054 //Well that's true.//
F1023 //It's all changed.//
F1025 //Aye mmhm.//
F1026 //they have lots of things whereas// I mean in our day //it wasn't the done thing to live together before you got married.//
F1023 //No, no oh no, married.// //No.//
F1026 //So when you had your house you needed everything from clothes pegs// //to dusters,//
F1023 //That's exactly,// //everything.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //to, everything.// //Whereas now they have all these things.//
F1023 //Yes, yes I did aye.//
F1025 //[inaudible] [laugh]//
F1026 In fact when you had your showing of presents people used to bring another wee //gift//
F1023 //Yes.//
F1024 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Aye that was yer wee// //[inaudible]//
F1023 //Yes.//
F1026 //yeah.// //Yeah, eh lots of different, yeah.//
F1023 //We got a tea// //[?]caddy[/?] and//
F1026 //Polish an// //mmhm.//
F1023 //tea and things like that mmhm.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Exciting eh it's kinna nice that sort of stuff, isn't it? //It's completely died,//
F1023 //But you don't really get it now, but//
F1026 //You just don't get it now at all.//
F1023 //you know, I never thought of the fact//
F1054 //yeah.//
F1023 //[?]that's right[/?]//
F1026 //Even a rolling pin, I remember somebody brought me a rolling pin at the showing of presents.//
F1027 //[?]takes me back[/?]//
F1023 Well I got, I got somebody, it was some old neighbour of Eddie's mum she made me like a clothes peg //bag, filled it with clothes pegs and things like that, you know,//
F1025 //Uh-huh.//
F1026 //Yeah, I got that too, yeah.// //You used to get basin sets wi//
F1023 //little things.//
F1026 your scrubbin brush and your //washin up brush and your wee//
F1027 //Aye.//
F1026 side thing, I don't know what that was for. //Was it for,//
F1023 //But I never,// it's just you say it's because people live together now and well they've got eve- you've got a kettle and //and a toaster.//
F1027 //I was made to go home// that week because we did live together. //And my mother made me come home again//
F1025 //[laugh]// //You were like the queen.//
F1027 //for my showing of presents.// //No, she she did! She told me//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //she wisnae havin all the neighbours comin in// //and me goin all the way oot again so I was I was//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //confined tae barracks! [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Oh no I was definitely in// the days where you werenae allowed, well I wisnae allowed to //heavens my grandmother would have flipped her lid if I suggested that.//
F1025 //Very [inaudible] [laugh]//
F1026 [inhale] In saying that, things change so much cause when my nieces and nephews started living together, so I mean my mum's grandchildren, she didn't think anything about that she thought it was quite okay, it was //quite normal. [inhale]//
F1023 //But it would have been different if you had//
F1025 //Quite often I think it's a good//
F1026 //but if I'd done it I'd have been out the door.// //You know?//
F1025 //idea.//
F1027 //Oh yeah.// //Aye mmhm.//
F1025 //Tae live together and get tae know each other.// //[laugh] Wouldnae be//
F1027 //Nae fight-// //[inaudible]//
F1025 //wouldnae be probably married for for- forty-five// //years [laugh] if we'd lived together!//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //That's the thing now, I I mean you made that point in jest but it's// //true isn't it [inaudible] eh.//
F1025 //I think it is, I think it's a good idea.// A wee trial run. //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //Mmhm.// //It could save a lot of divorces though, couldn't it?//
F1025 //Mmhm.// //Definitely definitely. [cough]//
F1026 //Mmhm [throat]//
F1027 //Well I used to go home on a Sunday to do my washin cause we never had a washin machine.// My mum would particularly make me hang the clothes out on the line, //to show that I was still livin in the house.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //All your little knickers and//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1023 //things! [laugh]//
F1027 //Uh-huh.// //None o Nick's stuff.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 It didnae go on the line. //But my washin went oot on the line.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //So who did Nick's washin?//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 Oh no I did the washin, like, but it never went oot on my mum's line. //My stuff//
F1023 //Only her stuff.//
F1026 //Oh aye.//
F1027 //went out, it was so the neighbours could see my washing on the line.//
F1054 //Aye.//
F1024 [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1023 //All her underwear! [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //I was twenty-seven years old at the time!//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 That's God's honest truth! //That went on for a year!//
F1024 //Oh.//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //Who did she think she was kiddin, eh?//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1023 //Ah but you see,//
F1024 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //so you're upholding the neighbourhood. [laugh]//
F1054 So ye had been oot for a year and ye went home every Sunday?
F1027 Well we we went there for our dinner on a Sunday and I used to do the washing at the same time you see, and before I knew where it was there'd be half a dozen of ma things oot on the line. //I never put them there!//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //And Nick, hidden indoors! [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[inhale]//
F1025 //His, his on the screen roon the//
F1054 //[inhale]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //fire cause there was nae tumbler-dryer. [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //His was in a poly bag and I was told// //to take them up the road! [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1023 //What a shame.//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Okay ehm what aboot// well baby, then? //Movin on fae Madge.//
F1023 //I would just call it baby,// it oh is it another name for baby? Oh I would //just say I, I would say baby.//
F1026 //I would say baby.//
F1024 Bairn. //Bairn, aye even a bairn.//
F1026 //Baby, would yous not say?//
F1023 //No I, I would say baby.//
F1024 //Jist a bairn,// //for a baby as well.//
F1026 //Some// folk would say sprog //but I don't think that's a nice word.//
F1023 //Oh no that's not nice.//
F1027 //Oh no.//
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //No.//
F1025 Bairn aye. //Bairn like, mmhm.//
F1024 //Bairn.//
F1027 //Bairn.//
F1025 //The bairn mm.//
F1026 //I think it's males// that say that word then more, sprog.
F1025 I I, no no, is it?
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //It's not a word I would use but it's a word I've heard.// //You know, like you hear it on the TV an//
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1023 //Is it not American//
F1026 //like males will talk aboot the sprog.//
F1027 //Mm.//
F1023 thing? //Sprog.//
F1026 //I don't know.//
F1023 I've heard it [inaudible] heard it. //No neither would I.//
F1027 //Oh I've heard it but I wouldn't use it.//
F1023 //[?]Aye I widnae use that.[/?]//
F1025 //Sometimes you've heard it if it if// if a kid was was a wee sprog, in like wee an //eh wee-er eh//
F1027 //Wee-er than normal?//
F1024 //Yeah, mm mmhm yeah.//
F1025 //a wee skinny wee craitur like you know I think I heard it in that like a wee sprog.// But, it's no ehm //bairn.//
F1023 //Eddie would say bairn.//
F1024 //No not a word I would use but,//
F1023 //I wouldn't so I would say baby//
F1025 //Mmhm aye the bairn.//
F1023 but Eddie would talk about the bairn.
F1054 Mmhm and what about ankle biter, ehm nipper, //kid?//
F1024 //Nipper,// //nipper I've heard nipper or kid.//
F1025 //Kid.//
F1023 //No.//
F1024 //Kid but,//
F1027 //Kid.//
F1024 //not ankle biter, I must admit,//
F1026 //I think of that as a// //dog, an ankle biter. [laugh]//
F1023 //I've never heard ankle biter, I've never//
F1024 //it's more, it's more for dogs! [laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1023 //never heard it much about her-, this area, nipper or kid.//
F1025 //Oor, oor kids//
F1027 //Aye mm.//
F1025 //didn't go bitin oor ankles! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //No.//
F1025 //We feed them!// //[laugh]//
F1027 //No, I, I,// //a kid I would refer to, if I,//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1027 //a kid I would think of as an// //older child, not a baby.//
F1023 //Yes, not a baby.// //A kid's somebody that's, a toddler, aye.//
F1027 //Like a toddler, mmhm.// The kiddie.
F1023 Aye the kiddie. //But not a//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //not a baby in a, like not a wee baby.//
F1026 //No a wee baby.//
F1023 Oh I would say baby. Mmhm.
F1054 Okay, good. What about eh female partner?
F1023 As in you're not married?
F1054 It's up to you, you interpret it as you like.
F1023 Well a bidie-in. [laugh] That's what they would say about here, I would think.
F1026 //If it's your partner but normally you'd//
F1054 //Erm.//
F1023 //Aye, aye, like//
F1026 //like it's your wife if it's//
F1023 if you- you're married //it's your husband or your wife. Aye.//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1027 But see I took that completely differently because I took it as ma pal. //You know, like ma friend.//
F1025 //I said girlfriend.// //That's what I//
F1023 //Mm no.//
F1027 //Ma best friend is ma pal.// //That's the way I//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1025 //girlfriend.//
F1027 //I took that.// //Partner.//
F1026 //He's got a female partner.// //It's female partner not//
F1054 //Aye, but if there isn't//
F1023 //Eh there is a female,//
F1027 //Uh-huh.// //Oh aye so there is.//
F1023 //there is a thing for friend.//
F1027 So I've got the pal in both of them. //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //And so have I! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //I took it//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Aboot the same status! [laugh]//
F1023 //as being a partner, but I could get ye didn't//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1023 you didn't state married, you see, so if you were married it would be your husband, if it you know or wife but if you're not, well //[cough]//
F1054 //And there's also a problem with sexuality, you know if somebody is// //is gay as well, probably called a partner,//
F1023 //Oh yes that's true but I don't know what you would call that then.//
F1054 yeah.
F1024 [cough] I think I would you, you know if you are inviting or talking about inviting wives or girlfriends, it would, it would, the bird's getting to come, //the bird is//
F1025 //Uh-huh.//
F1024 but whether that's a new word or not, it's certainly but that's more of a male maybe //speaking more from work.//
F1023 //Aye.//
F1024 They would sort of say that.
F1054 [inaudible] Er, what abo- I suppose girlfriend as well. //What aboot lassie?//
F1023 //Well, friend, you see, is just a pal. Your girlfriend or your//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1026 //Nope.//
F1027 //Uh-huh.//
F1023 like if it was //you know, your, you know, your best friend.//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 So words for friend then would be
F1023 //Well yer pal, yer mate.//
F1026 //Mate.//
F1027 //Mate.//
F1023 //Mate. Uh-huh.//
F1024 //Your buddy, your mucker.//
F1025 //Mm.//
F1024 Mucker's another one.
F1054 I think you've got a few words in there that I'd eh I've heard fae guys, but I guess, it's cause yer workin //in a male environment, yeah, yeah.//
F1024 //Probably, probably yeah.//
F1025 //[cough]//
F1023 [laugh] Male environment. //[laugh]Oh well, I think it would here it would just be your//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1023 //your pal or your mate,//
F1025 //Pal.//
F1026 //Pal.//
F1023 mmhm.
F1054 Okay, what about eh male partner?
F1023 Well husband if you're married.
F1024 //Your man.//
F1027 //Aye or your partner just, just// mmhm.
F1024 Your bloke.
F1025 Your boyfriend. //Boyfriend.//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1027 Jist the same, aye.
F1054 Anything different amongst the young folk, do they call their, do they call, bairns call their boyfiends, girlfriends, partners [?]more[/?] //mmhm?//
F1024 //No.//
F1025 //No.//
F1054 Okay. Ehm what about eh young person in cheap trendy clothes and jewellery?
F1023 Common as muck? //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// //Tart!//
F1024 //Probably, probably a minger.//
F1025 A minger [laugh] minger!
F1024 //Or a gudgie.//
F1026 //A gadgie?// //A gadgie.//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1024 //Gudgie.// //Yeah.//
F1026 //Minger.// A mink as well. //No?//
F1024 //Mm no.// //Well aye.//
F1026 //Well a mink's more a tink.// //Isn't it?//
F1024 //Yeah yeah.//
F1025 //Aye mm.//
F1026 [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1054 //What's a mink and a tink?//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh] Yes.//
F1024 //Those, those of the travelling fraternity.//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //That's right, yes.// [laugh] Am I not allowed to say that? //Am I not being politically//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //correct?//
F1054 //A wee bit, but that's alright, no, that's fine to say cause it's just// //ehm language it's just dialect.//
F1024 //That's right.//
F1026 We'll be gettin sued! [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1027 //You're not putting any names// //to this, are you?//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh] [inhale]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 Or ehm what aboot slapper or //tart?//
F1027 //Yeah, mmhm.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Slapper and tart yes com- oh well uh//
F1025 //Slapper and tart.// //Tart, [?]chick[/?].//
F1023 //common as muck, you see, a lot of// //people would say "oh she's as common as muck".//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1027 //Mmhm yeah.//
F1023 //[inhale] Mm.//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1025 //[?]A tart[/?]//
F1027 //Or she's a right ane.// //And just leave it at that.//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1027 You know some- //something like that.//
F1026 //It's usually a tart.//
F1023 Or tarty, aye real, real tarty mmhm.
F1025 //Tarty, tart, mmhm.//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1023 Mmhm or if it was an older person, it could be like mutton dressed as lamb. //You get that, you see.//
F1027 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1023 //Ma granny used to say that about certain people, she said//
F1026 //Aye.// //[inaudible]//
F1023 //just mutton dressed as lamb but that's// maybe describing somebody maybe older. Tryin tae make themselves look trendy [laugh] and young. [laugh] //Mm.//
F1054 //What about a// kit of tools?
F1023 I wouldn't know.
F1027 Oh there been- that was a big discussion in our //house.//
F1023 //Aye I asked Eddie, if he'd, aye,//
F1026 //I just say a tool kit.//
F1023 //he said//
F1027 //Tool kit, or the tools.// My dad would refer to the tools, go an get the tools, meanin go an get the tool box.
F1054 Uh-huh. //[inaudible] is it,//
F1023 //I asked Eddie but he didnae have//
F1054 did something manual
F1027 Well he was a printer, but I mean he was quite good with his hands, you know, sort of mechanically, I would say so. It would be "Go and get the tool box."
F1024 I think //well that- that's more when you've got like the garden shed or the workshop or something you would have your//
F1054 //Aye yes.// //Mmhm.//
F1024 //tools laid out anyway in their right place rather than just// //in the house havin a a bag of tools.//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1027 Well we had both, like, we had like a a box in the [laugh] under the stairs //where the sort of//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1027 the screwdriver and things like that, whereas the garden shed had the big tools.
F1025 Mmhm mmhm.
F1027 So it would be "Go and get the tools."
F1026 The tool kit and tool box.
F1024 Mm what does Frank call it?
F1025 The tool box I think just the //tool, tool box.//
F1054 //Is that, is that your man, Madge?// //Okay.//
F1025 //No, my son, he's a plumber, aye.// //Eh aye.//
F1054 //Tell me aboot// his day and him preparing for his day. What would he say as he's gettin ready.
F1025 I wou- ah ah I don't I mean it's usually in the van anyway, very seldom in the house but they buy these, you know, these new things that they fold ower an then they clip down and they've got the handles now. You used tae have before like for joiners used to be the wooden eh the the canvas bags and the leather handles, and that was their tool bag. //The joiner had a tool bag, it was always a tool bag for a joiner.//
F1026 //Mmhm yeah.//
F1027 //Mmhm yeah.//
F1054 //Mmhm right.//
F1025 [inhale] Ehm but I think most of them now have all got these modern boxes, so a tool box I would say, that's what he would call it a tool box.
F1054 Okay.
F1025 In my case, it's lying, they're lying all aboot //the garage floor, [laugh] I don't, you've got to//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 tool find. [laugh]
F1054 Treasure hunt! //[laugh]//
F1025 //Aye! [laugh]// //Mm.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[inhale] Pam's obviously very organised, ehm// let me see, I think we've covered all that noo. Oh word for something whose name you've forgotten.
F1026 Thingummyjig.
F1024 Thingummyjig, thingummybob.
F1023 Same, thingummyjig.
F1027 Thingummybob. //Mmhm.//
F1025 //I've got thingummyjig and// //I canny mind, canny.//
F1024 //Whodyacomepoofle.// Whodyacomepoofle. //That's wh- that's what//
F1023 //I've never heard that.//
F1026 //No I've not heard that one.//
F1024 my mum and dad would have said, whodyacomepoofle. //But they're Edinburgh.//
F1027 //No my sister says [inaudible].//
F1025 [laugh]
F1024 Whodyacomepo? //Coof? Poof?//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1054 //For something, the name you've// //forgotten it, uh-huh.//
F1024 //Right, yeah.// //Sorry?//
F1023 //Singmejig, it's from singummyjig//
F1025 //Singummyjig aye.//
F1026 //[inaudible]//
F1027 //[inaudible]//
F1054 //How would you use that one? How would you use whodyacomepoof?//
F1024 [tut] Ehm sort of eh we'd be speaking maybe about [inhale] "What, where where did where did you put the oh ehm [exhale] trying tae think whodyacomepoofle?" is jist if they were trying tae think or speaking about something an it's more of an inanimate object rather than a person or a dog or a whatever it would be. Whereas the whodyacomepoofle, mean the screwdriver or, or the pan or something like that. That's that's the way it would be used.
F1054 Mmhm.
F1024 Yeah. Which is quite eh //when you think about it, it's quite a complex word for for just a simple wee//
F1054 //Mm mmhm.//
F1024 "Where's the thing?" //You know, where is it,//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //you know? [laugh] But you've got tae have this huge complex word.// //[laugh]//
F1054 //I know.// //That's great, fine.//
F1024 //[throat]//
F1054 Okay, into the next one, what they wear. Clothes first of all.
F1023 //I couldn't think//
F1027 //Mm [inaudible].// //I've just got clothes,//
F1023 //of one. I've just got// //clothes, clothes.//
F1027 //mmhm.//
F1024 //I think the kids would say gear or kit.//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1024 They would say like well it would be sports kit, //if we were playing hockey, I mean, you would take sports kit with you.//
F1025 //Uh-huh mmhm.//
F1024 But for, for clothes, goin out clothes it would be clothes or gear, //I would say, yeah.//
F1025 //Gear yeah.// Gear or claes. //[laugh] Claes [laugh] mmhm.//
F1024 //Claes aye.//
F1027 //Claes.//
F1024 //Aye.//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1026 //No I'd say the same, that's what I've got down as well.//
F1054 //[throat]// Cool. Em and on the sporty theme, child's soft shoes //worn for PE?//
F1026 //[inhale]// Gymshoes, plimsoles, gutties. I'd have probably said, when I was small, I'd have said my gymshoes. //But my kids would say trainers of course now.//
F1027 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1026 Ehm gutties, is more a word for using when you're on a boat isn't it, gutties? //No? Yeah.//
F1024 //Does he?//
F1025 //Frank says gutties, aye. He says// gutties but h-, that was a word he said //gutties. [laugh]//
F1054 //Tell me aboot that, Madge.// //Tell me.//
F1025 //Mmhm well// my husband's got a boat an eh when we were talkin aboot that the last day it was gutties he said, but he's from Errol as well and they're a different [inhale] he says different words. He always calls me the toonie, [inhale] you know, cause Errol has a different //even wi that distance it's only what//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1025 seven, eight mile down the road, is it? [inhale] And it's a different dialect altogether. He says gutties. I would I would say [inhale] jimmies or eh eh probably say ma jimmies like //that's what I would say.//
F1027 //Mm gym shoe,// //sannie uh-huh definitely sandshoes.//
F1024 //Sannies, sannies short for sandshoe.//
F1025 //Gymshoes or,// //uh-huh uh-huh.//
F1023 //Aye I said sandshoes when I was at school,//
F1027 //[inaudible]//
F1023 but Eddie said it was plimsoles. //He said he would definitely say plimsoles, definite mmhm.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Plimsoles.// //I think that's a right English word,//
F1023 //Because// //Yes, yes well I asked him an I says "What do, would you say?" an he says//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //plimsoles. [laugh]//
F1023 //So I definitely would say plimsoles, but I, see I said sandshoes//
F1026 //[inhale]// //Mmhm yeah.//
F1023 //when I was at school.//
F1054 Mmhm. Okay, good eh trousers?
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Breeks.//
F1023 Breeks.
F1024 Eh breeks.
F1026 No I'd say trousers.
F1023 //I would say trousers but that//
F1025 //Oooh! [laugh]//
F1023 again that was my husband, he said breeks! //That's what he would say.//
F1026 //But I mean I// would automatically say to the boys if I was tellin them to get dressed [inhale] "Go and put your trousers on."
F1023 So would I, I wouldnae say
F1026 I wouldn't say "Go and put your breeks on". To me breeks are yer underpants, yer knickers.
F1025 [laugh]
F1026 [laugh] Well that's //what I would say.//
F1024 //So you'd be hoping they had them on//
F1025 //Aye.// //[laugh]//
F1024 //anyway, yeah. [laugh]//
F1026 //Yes, yes I'd be hopin they had their breeks on anyway!//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //Underneath their troosers. [laugh]//
F1023 //Although I've got breeks, that's not what I would actually physically say, no I was like you, I wo-, I was my son I would be saying to him "Go and change your trousers."//
F1024 //[laugh][cough]//
F1025 Mm I have troosers. I have troosers or slacks that was another //quite a modern name slacks.//
F1026 //But that's an old-fashioned word now.// //Isn't it? Slacks?//
F1023 //Slacks.//
F1025 //Slacks, an// //mmhm//
F1026 //[inaudible]// //Women used to wear slacks,//
F1025 //slacks.//
F1027 //Mmhm.// //Mmhm.//
F1025 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //whereas we don't wear slacks now, we wear jeans or,//
F1025 Mmhm. //Nope, nope, nope.//
F1026 //whatever, you don't wear slacks, do you?//
F1025 That's an Edinburgh word again [inaudible].
F1026 What?
F1024 //Slacks, yeah.//
F1025 //Slacks.//
F1054 Do you have memories of your parents using different stuff or you growing up wi different stuff in Edinburgh?
F1024 Yeah I, I just remember never being allowed to wear jeans, because jeans were //common and you didn't get to wear jeans when you were//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1024 a girl in particular! [laugh] Jeans were always the sort of, the the the trades, the workfolk, that's what they wore to work in and the thought of actually wearing jeans other than that, you know, it's not //bu- bu-//
F1025 //We wouldnae wear jeans// //in our young days though cause that as you say it was workmen that//
F1023 //No I never wore I never wore jeans, no.//
F1025 //wore jeans, to go to their work.//
F1026 //[inaudible]// //the generation even below me//
F1025 //I know.//
F1026 so I mean we didnae have jeans, //no we didn't, we didn't have jeans.//
F1027 //No we didn't. The first jeans I can remember were Sea Dogs.//
F1025 [inhale] //Uh-huh.//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1027 //Which are flares, basically what we wear now, just, you know, flared jeans.// An it took me about a year before my parents let me buy a pair of them.
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1025 //I'm actually no keen on jeans.//
F1023 //I don't, do you know that I've never//
F1027 //[inaudible]//
F1023 possessed a pair of jeans in my life. //I don't like jeans. [laugh]//
F1025 //No keen on jeans.// //I don't mind this kinna thing but actual jeans.//
F1023 //[laugh] I've never possessed a pair of jeans in my life.// Maybe it was because, well, //we were brought up in a//
F1025 //Aye.// //Aye, uh-huh.//
F1023 //a, a thing that we never had jeans and I would never dream of buying a pair.// [inhale] //[inaudible]//
F1025 //Wore jeans when we went tae tatties, [laugh] when we picked tatties you wore the jeans, you know,// //but not.//
F1023 //Yeah, I mean I would be about sixteen or seventeen maybe// [inhale] when I, I used to //started to wear trousers, you know, at home so you're talking, this is the fif- late fifties//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1023 [inhale] and my grandfather was still alive at the time and he hated women in trousers, and he used to, "If you were meant to wear trousers you would have been born a boy!" //"Get them off! You should have a skirt on", an//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 //oh he was really//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1023 quite angry about it. But I mean now I'm never hardly in a skirt [laugh] but I mean I wear trousers but I have never had jeans, no.
F1054 Just a step too far, Olive?
F1023 //Definitely. [inhale]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 //Cause it was probably yes, maybe because, well, they wirnae really on the go in our day.//
F1024 //Nope.//
F1025 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1023 [inhale] And by the time I got married an was working I had to wear a skirt all the time. It was in the days when you weren't allowed to wear trousers at work, [inhale] and ehm so you had to wear a skirt or dress or whatever.
F1025 //I think it is great now that they can//
F1026 //[throat]//
F1023 I do too. When I even when I started dow- which was in nineteen eighty-seven when I started down the road part-time, [inhale] //they weren't allowed to wear trousers at work, but I mean they cannae stop, well they say they can't stop you//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1023 //you now, so//
F1026 //We weren't allowed to wear trousers.//
F1027 //Oh no [?]me too[/?].//
F1026 //And in fact, when I started work if you had stiletto heels//
F1054 //[cough]//
F1026 ehm on a Saturday you were allowed to wear them, any other day of the week you weren't, [inhale] but you had to wear what we called stiletto heel protectors, //because, so they didn't mark the floor.//
F1023 //Didn't mark the floor.//
F1027 //So they didn't mark the floor.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1026 //Mmhm.// Isn't it dreadful!
F1054 Where do you work?
F1026 Well I used to, in these days it was the G.A. in Perth, [inhale] an you work Monday to Friday obviously, nine to five, but you had to work a Saturday morning, so you obviously got a concession because you'd be going out after work, so you were allowed to wear stiletto heels, //but you ha-. It's an insurance company.//
F1054 //What was the G.A.?//
F1024 //What is it now then.//
F1025 //Norwich Union.//
F1026 //Yeah, ehm,// but even latterly when I worked in eh McEwans, you still weren't allowed to wear trousers. //not at all. You had,//
F1054 //What's McEwen?//
F1026 it's ladies' fashion, believe it or not. [inhale] And and you had to wear tights, you werenae allowed bare legs even in the summer, not sandals, court shoes ehm an ye had to be dressed smartly in a suit.
F1054 An uniforms, they dinnae change for police officers? //Ta-, tell me aboot that?//
F1024 //Very mu-, very much so.// Well I joined the ci-, the city of Dundee police about thirty years ago, and at that time we wore skirts which had to be boxed, you had to iron them so that it looks as though you were wearing a box for a skirt and the tunic top, ehm and tights and shoes and you got a tight allowance. [laugh] Ehm and I mean that was, I think, ten years later we were allowed to wear, I was working in Perth at that time, it had become Tayside Police, and at that time you were allowed to wear trousers in the late shift, during the hours of darkness basically. //[inhale] But if you were at court at all you wore a skirt and you wore a hat,//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 although the women have to wear hats in the court. Ehm even in, in Dundee when I first joined, if you were in the C.I.D. plain clothes you had to wear a hat if you were in court. Ehm but it all changed. Very much so, it's far more practical now to wear boots an a pair of trousers, especially if your havin tae //wrestle with folk or climb walls an deal with things,//
F1054 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1024 ehm //an lot, lot, lot of change//
F1025 //[inaudible] as well.//
F1026 //[throat]//
F1024 with the uniform, a lot more practical.
F1054 Even in my my day, things like handbags have changed.
F1024 We had to have a handbag yes, and [laugh] we were issued with a baton which was about nine inches long as if that could //do you anybody any, [laugh] or save your skin at all, you know,//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1024 ehm but yeah handbag with everything in it. Ehm now you've got the utility belts an you've got your spray, your ASP and various things ehm.
F1025 It just seems to me awful heavy you know like //I would imagine someone tryin to run//
F1026 //It is heavy.//
F1025 //in order to run about, I would have thought it would hold them back.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Hold them back, mm.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1026 //Even the, I mean// my son's in the police as well and I mean even your your body armour that you've got tae wear and the thing is you're not allowed to take it off even when you go in the car, so you've to sit
F1025 Mm.
F1026 with all this on and I mean sometimes they've got sore backs, cause they've got all this weight round their waist plus your big body armour an, //I mean it must//
F1024 //Cer- certainly,// I have to say I would rather //I//
F1025 //[?]just comes[/?]//
F1024 I would rather be wearing all of that and be safe, //and carry that stuff and be safe,//
F1025 //Oh definitely, yes mmhm mmhm.//
F1026 //Oh yes, yes yes yeah.//
F1024 than not have it.
F1025 //[cough] But I would have thought like//
F1054 //Somebody coming?//
F1025 wi aw that round the belt an somebody was like, say you were climbing up a wall or a fence ho- ye'd think it would get //caught on,//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1025 you know, or hold you back that //wee bit.//
F1054 //Aye but it would be better to have it though,// //you know?//
F1025 //Oh and specially the// //the body thing in case you were stabbed an that.//
F1026 //It would kill you to run//
F1054 //Yeah.//
F1026 with that on, there is no way I could //I mean I've//
F1024 //But you're not young and fit//
F1025 //It would kill me to run withoot that on!//
F1024 //[?]like me[/?].//
F1026 //I know, I mean I've tried all Craig's stuff on. There's no way I mean I// can hardly get up off //the chair, never mind run wi it on!//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh] Know what I mean? I would just be//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1026 that would kill me, no //not at all.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[cough]//
F1026 But even, even nurses' uniforms, I mean look how they've changed. I mean when my sister was a nurse she'd to wear [inhale] black stockings and your [inhale] black shoes and your proper starched uniform and hat //and now it's all//
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //tunics and trousers, yeah.//
F1027 //[?]So much more comfortable to wear.[/?]//
F1023 //Oh yeah.//
F1026 //And I mean it is much more sensible.//
F1023 Yes it is.
F1026 Much more sensible. //I mean leaning over all these beds an//
F1025 //[inaudible] the tunic on// //like nothing else underneath it an it's much, you know, for the//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //warm an that, it's much easier for them//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1025 [inhale] for eh sweatin and such //like, you know I think it's great.//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Okay, into the next section, I'm just kinna anxious to get through everything so we're no keepin you too long.// Ehm, how you feel, shall we start, let's start on a positive note, pleased? Words for pleased, //Yvonne?//
F1027 //Chuffed.// Mmhm. Fair chuffed.
F1054 Tell me aboot a time when ye were fair chuffed.
F1027 [laugh] I'm always fair chuffed. //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1024 Fair chuffed that we're gettin to go to //Prague this year.//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //Yes I'm I'm really chuffed// //that we're going to Prague this year!//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 Cause last year we were booked to go to Prague and I did my Achilles tendon, //an I was definitely un-chuffed!//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[cough] [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1024 //Seek, in fact.//
F1027 //[laugh]// //I was fair seek! [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 This on your holidays?
F1027 This was Pam and I last year, yes, so we're going this year.
F1054 Okay good, any other words for pleased?
F1023 Oh no I've just got the same. I've just got chuffed, just
F1024 Yeah, chuffed's the same wi me, fair chuffed.
F1054 Mmhm.
F1026 Yeah, fair pleased, chuffed, happy. I'd say chuffed as well.
F1025 Now, happy, I've got happy. //Mm. [inhale]//
F1054 //An whit about the opposite of that, Madge, annoyed?//
F1025 Eh whit have we got for annoyed? Oh angry. Angry, mmhm bilin, angry. [laugh] Mm that's what I would say for that.
F1027 Ragin, bilin.
F1023 Rattled, you could be rattled if something really annoyed you. Much the same.
F1024 [click] I think I'd be biling.
F1026 I'd be pissed off. //Or hacked off.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //I'm glad there's somebody in here that's going to keep up the exciting// //sweary words, I think that's great.//
F1023 //I was going to write that but I didnae want to write//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //You would, I mean if you were really//
F1023 //yes, yes aye.//
F1054 //If you were really// //abody would say//
F1023 //[?]My husband would say[/?]// //that, an I I'd probably//
F1024 //Yeah.//
F1023 I'd turn round and say, I am pissed off wi it //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1026 Or I'm really hacked off, //you know, so//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1026 either of these two or something I would probably use, yeah.
F1054 It's amazing in Scotland how little words we have for describing the way we feel aboot things, //compared to some places in the world,//
F1026 //I know.//
F1054 ken? It's such a small smattering.
F1026 It's true cause I mean really to be annoyed, you'd think you would have I mean I suppose pissed off really just covers //everything. [laugh]//
F1023 //It does, it's actually//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //It does really! [laugh] Doesn't it?//
F1023 the best word of //the lot. [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Get it all oot yer system,// //doesn't it?//
F1023 //Yeah.//
F1054 Okay ehm words for tired?
F1027 Knackered. //Buggered.//
F1023 //Knackered.//
F1024 Shattered. //Knackered.//
F1054 //Dingwall said that, I [inaudible].//
F1024 Shattered.
F1026 No I would say shattered as well. I would say I'm //shattered.//
F1025 //Wabbit.// //Wabbit.//
F1023 //Aye I know that,// //I've said I'm fair wabbit.//
F1025 //Wabbit. [laugh]// //Mm fair wabbit mm.//
F1024 //Fair wabbit, aye.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //It's a good Scots one, isn't it? Yeah.// What aboot unwell?
F1025 Eh, sick or ehm nae weel, kinna no feelin //well an//
F1023 //Feelin rotten.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1025 that's eh that's aboot it.
F1027 Aye seek. //Mm.//
F1026 //I was asking the kids about this one and they said// they'd probably said they felt pants.
F1023 Oh I've never heard that.
F1026 Pants.
F1024 Uh-huh aye. //Mmhm yeah.//
F1026 //Your kids would say that as well, wouldn't they?// Instead of saying "I don't feel well" they say "I feel pants this morning."
F1025 //Never heard that one.//
F1027 //Mm I don't think I've ever heard that one.//
F1024 Hellish. //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 //And the kids would say that as well I think aye. [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //They'd get a clip round the ear for it too, well no, not now they're too big! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //Oh.//
F1023 //Jist feelin rotten.// Mm just just feelin, aye.
F1025 Rotten.
F1054 We say [?]poor am us[/?] back home. //[?]Poor am us[/?], yeah.//
F1024 //[?]Poor am us[/?]?//
F1026 //That's good.//
F1023 //I've never heard that one no.//
F1024 //I like that.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Yeah.// Peely wally's another ain.
F1023 //Aye.//
F1024 //Peely wally.//
F1027 //Aye peely wally.// Mmhm. //Mm.//
F1023 //That really more describes somebody if they're like// been sick and then //white as a ghost, my granny would have said//
F1025 //White, white,//
F1027 //White, white palour.//
F1023 //she looks peely wally, aye that's, you know,//
F1024 //Aye. mmhm.//
F1025 //peely wally mmhm mmhm.//
F1054 Whit aboot cold?
F1023 Frozen.
F1027 Aye freezin. //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Aye freezin aye.//
F1024 Bitter. Bitter.
F1054 Mmhm.
F1024 Or bitter without the T., //if you come from Perth! [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 No, that's the best bit about the Perth accent. [laugh]
F1026 //[laugh] No I would say//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1026 freezin or it's bitter cold outside. //Or you could say baltic.//
F1027 //Baltic.//
F1026 //Sometimes you would say "God, it's baltic out there."//
F1054 //Yeah, baltic's another one.// //That's got popular recently, hasn't it?//
F1027 //Aye.// Yeah, I think it's quite a modern sort of //expression, baltic.//
F1023 //I think the likes of Amy would maybe// //say baltic, baltic//
F1027 //Aye she would say baltic.// //Mmhm.//
F1054 //She sounds like a real girl about town.//
F1027 [laugh] She certainly is. //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh] Eighteen goin// //on thirty. [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh] Och oh well.// //eighteen going on twenty-five anyway.//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1054 Mmhm. Ehm we've done, have we done hot? No we've no done hot. //Madge.//
F1025 //Eh bilin.// I would say bilin mm. //Yeah.//
F1054 //Like, could that be mad and//
F1025 Mmhm mm for the two.
F1027 I've got roastin, sweatin.
F1023 //Roastin's one I've got.//
F1024 //Ploutin.// //Ploutin.//
F1023 //Oh right.//
F1026 //I've heard that, yeah, but, mmhm.//
F1023 I've heard it but not really a lot.
F1024 You'd really be sweaty hot to be ploutin. Or, or the weather's pretty ploutin.
F1026 I'll be ploutin next week, Pam.
F1024 Aye. //Egypt? [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //I'll be in Egypt next week! [laugh]//
F1025 [inaudible] //[inaudible]//
F1026 //It'll be in the thirties hopefully.// //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh] Hopefully!//
F1027 //[inaudible]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //It better no be baltic anyway! [laugh]// //[laugh] Twice.//
F1025 //Have you been before? You like Egypt then?// //You like, obviously like Egypt then?//
F1026 //Sorry? Yeah.// And I've got a fascination, into hieroglyphics and everything I'm into it all. //Yep.//
F1054 //Aye.//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1025 //She's wearing a cartouche.//
F1026 Well not yet. //What? Mmhm.//
F1054 //Does that say your name?// //I see.//
F1026 //And Cleopatra on the other side.//
F1023 He's got his name on his cartouche. [laugh]
F1054 Okay, ehm we've done aa that, pleased, tired, unweel, hot, cold, annoyed. This is the last wheel then, to throw something?
F1027 Eh to chuck a ball
F1025 Eh heave. Heave.
F1023 Fling.
F1024 Chuck or fling.
F1026 I've said that as well but I've also said bung, you know, bung that over here.
F1054 Mmhm mmhm.
F1026 You know if somebo-, you want somebody tae throw it to you, you'd say "Gonna bung that over."
F1023 Aye.
F1024 //Launch. [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Oh I'm sorry that's my mobile I beg your pardon.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //It's a bit [inaudible], is it? [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Okay, this is the Perth interview continued, so we just were doin words for// throw, throw something, we've got heave, chuck, //fling.//
F1023 //Fling.//
F1024 Launch. //Ehm you launch something at//
F1054 //Is it a hockey word?//
F1024 sorry, no it's not a hockey word really you just launch somethin. //Eh I think I think if you were throwing something//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1024 at something like a stone, you'd launch a stone at it.
F1026 I said bung at the time, you know, bung something over here, gonna bung that newspaper over here. I wouldn't, you wouldn't ask somebody
F1023 To throw it?
F1026 well I wouldn't bung it to somebody but I'd probably ask somebody to bung it to me if that makes sense?
F1054 [inaudible] Wor-wor- words we use back home are eh wap, [?]bell[/?], heave. //I guess the heave is a bit like your [inaudible].//
F1025 //[inaudible].//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Right, to play truant?
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1027 //Bunkin, skippin school, bunk off.// //Mmhm.//
F1026 //Skive?// //Skive school.//
F1025 //Skiving.//
F1026 Not something I ever did, so I didn't really know what the word was.
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1024 [laugh] Plunkin school. That would be it. //Not that I ever did either, [laugh] plunkin school.//
F1023 //Why I// I definitely never played truant, no I I would say the same as Yvonne, skive, bunking off. We were all very good, I mean //I//
F1026 //Truant's a modern// //I know it's an old word but it's not something that//
F1023 //Yeah.// //Ye hardly ever heard of truant,//
F1026 //people would say, yeah.//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1054 //Folk used tae truant cause they had tae I suppose.//
F1024 [inaudible]
F1023 //You never really heard of people playing truant much in//
F1026 //[cough]//
F1023 //our day.//
F1025 //I, I only once// ever done it an I lost the Midlands trial through it! [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 One and only time ever done it Flo [CENSORED: surname] I thought she was going to kill me I went an bound up our hockey sticks for her like when I was meant tae go to the Midlands trial an eh Sheila [CENSORED: surname] eh [?]and she, one of my mates, she died in New Zealand there[/?] an she had the mumps an two o us said right we'll just no bother goin and we'll come up an spend the time wi you so we had paper rolled up like for fags like, you know, //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 an we had, her dad had one o thon big long things for shavin and he sliced, we sliced up all the tatties and we had crisps an fags and the music playing, we were doin great and this knock come tae the door school board officers, I hadnae a clue who she was like "Miss [CENSORED: surname], //please accompany back to school," I had tae walk//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1025 [inhale] //back to the school where//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 an I I lost the Midlands hockey trial, cause I had tae go to, it was an exam, it was a geography exam. //I hate geography and um [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1025 //and [laugh]// I had to go, I meant tae go and sit the geography exam on a Saturday mornin but there'd been a mix up, cause obviously Flo had went to the headmaster and said I had a Midlands hockey trial, but the word hadnae got back to me, so I missed the trial you see, so. And I went, had to go and sit the exam wi the jannie //[inhale]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1025 //watchin oer me.//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 And I got seventy-five percent or something cause the jannie given me //the answers! [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //The one and only time you passed! [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //Aye! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh] [cough]//
F1025 //It was good.// //[cough] But I just about got killed, cause I should have been in the Midlands the year before//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1025 [?]I actually was in it[/?] //[laugh]//
F1026 //[cough]//
F1025 That's only once I've ever truanted school. //I'd never dae it again.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Nae wonder ye didnae dae it again mind.//
F1023 //But no it wasn't//
F1025 //It wisnae worth it.//
F1023 //I don't think it was common in our day.//
F1026 //No it wasn't.//
F1027 No I didn't do it. //I didn't.//
F1026 //No I didn't.//
F1023 Neither did I. //[inaudible]//
F1026 //It would have been different I mean when I lived in Cupar Angus if I had bunked off everybody would have known.// So //you just couldn't do it because in a a small village everybody knew what everybody was doing.//
F1027 //[inaudible]//
F1025 Well I suppose even like us, like I think there was three of us all together but eh //three of them out of the one class at the one time, you know?//
F1026 //Yeah.// //[inaudible]//
F1025 //They wouldnae bother, that wouldnae be noticed now,// //but in they days it was because we were//
F1023 //Oh aye.//
F1025 //never off.//
F1027 //But then my sister was in your year and she was aye bunkin off.// She wis, I mean half a dozen of them used to go AWOL on an afternoon.
F1024 But I think not really in sort of first to fourth year I don't think we would //at all but certainly fifth and sixth year we were//
F1027 //But she didnae even pass fourth year so she didnae [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1024 certainly fifth and sixth year, erm yeah, //a fair bit of going fishing instead.//
F1026 //I suppose you could// say you had a few free periods, //that's where as you didn't have a free period you actually were bunking off.//
F1024 //Well that's what we'd have done aye.// I was quite lucky cause I played an instrument at school so you could pretend that you were actually had instrument lessons or orchestra practice and nobody ever //bothered, just let you carry on.//
F1027 //Aye, I went to a lot of choir practice.// //Yes, I was in the choir from//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Did you?//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //day one to// //Hey, well there you go! [laugh]//
F1023 //I didn't know that you were a singer! [?]you were well hidden there[/?] [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //I never said I was a singer, I said I was in the choir! [laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //She polished their shoes!//
F1027 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //That was a clever one.//
F1023 //Oh God!//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 Right ehm to sleep.
F1027 Kip, goin for a kip. //Mmhm.//
F1023 //I've got goin for forty winks, takin a nap?//
F1054 [inaudible]
F1026 Go for a lie down. Crash out, maybe the young ones would say that, wouldn't they, they would say crash out. //But I'd probably just say I'm going for forty winks.//
F1023 //So would I.//
F1026 If I'm going to bed I'm going to sleep, but if I was just goin for a wee snooze.
F1024 Mm I suppose it would be kip, //kipping, sleep.//
F1054 //You working nightshifts, Pam?// Do you need to kip a lot?
F1024 //You certainly do although I don't seem to manage it just as well as I used to when was I younger. [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1024 But yeah, aye, you have to kip through the day, that's //it's not as good//
F1023 //Do you do you// find it quite difficult especially in the summertime if it is a light day //you know, the sun//
F1024 //Yeah.// //Yeah,//
F1023 //is shining do you have tae darken// //the room and try and make it//
F1024 //I// //I used to be able to sleep anytime, anywhere, any place, nightshift is the only, I still can//
F1023 //dark.//
F1024 but nightshift's the only time I have a problem an that's just fairly recent I would say within the last //four five years really.//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1023 It's a sign you see of you getting older because as you //get older you do not//
F1024 //Thank you.//
F1023 need as much sleep. //Do you?//
F1024 //Oh I still need as much sleep, oh yes, aye.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //But that's the alcohol, Pam. [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1024 Alcohol induced.
F1025 I read that wrong cause it said "what you do to sleep", //you know, so I//
F1027 //Oh, I see.//
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1025 //you know, yeah and I and I//
F1054 //Ah got ye, good thinkin, Madge. [laugh]//
F1025 I put read. //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //No, that's a good one, it says what you do.//
F1025 //No it says what you do//
F1026 //[cough]//
F1025 //to sleep, yeah.//
F1027 //Uh-huh yes.//
F1054 //Good thinkin you're absolutely right.// //You're spot on there.//
F1023 //[inaudible] [laugh]//
F1025 //And I thought well I do read,// //I'm no tellin everybody else what I do but I read! [laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //An I watch the telly and I get up an make//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Cup of tea! [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //myself a cup of tea! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //But that's the way I read that, so I read it kinna wrong maybe//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1025 //No.//
F1054 //What about to play a game?//
F1023 Well I couldn't figure it out, I didn't know what you meant by that! I was being like you and your //sleep.//
F1025 //And yet again I was the same I've wrote// //nowadays it's darts cause I'm//
F1023 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1025 //I'm buggered for the hockey! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// //So I just throw an arrow or two! [laugh]//
F1054 //[?]What do you do, what, what are you doing?[/?] [laugh]// //To play a game?//
F1023 //Well I don't know, to play a game?//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 I would say like muck around. //No? Is that what you mean?//
F1023 //Oh that kind of game?//
F1026 //Is that what you mean by to play, to go out, to muck around?//
F1054 //That's right aye.//
F1026 //Yeah, like go out to muck about.//
F1027 //Goin out to play?//
F1054 [inaudible] //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //Are you still playing? [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //Do you still play! [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh] What//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //When she's at her choir! [laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1023 //do you do to play a game?//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //You see I thought it meant like what you do//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1023 to play a game like if you were gonnae play a game //yeah, but like what I mean as a-//
F1027 //Like a game of cards?//
F1023 our age group I mean what kind of games do we //play! [laugh]//
F1024 //Quite a lot actually.//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Aye true! [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //You must have had a drink.// //When erm we play canasta it's suppos- I mean a nice long card game, but it usually ends up so//
F1023 //[cough]//
F1026 [inhale] noisy that I mean when my kids were small they used to come down and say we can't sleep //for the noise down here because you're having a drink,//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 playin cards an I mean a game of canasta can take //two hours, three hours sometimes,//
F1027 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1026 but if there's a bit of cheatin goin on and a bit of hilarity then, you know, //it's quite noisy. [laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[inaudible]//
F1026 //With a bit of alcohol.//
F1027 Well I couldnae even think of any ehm sort of words there but I put doon games that we'd play as a child like doublers or beddies because I know that like these all had different names in different towns //like//
F1026 //Hopscotch.// //Mmhm hopscotch.//
F1023 //No I,//
F1027 //yeah, well see I wouldn't, I wouldn't call hopscotch, I would// //call it beddies mmhm.//
F1023 //beddies so would I.//
F1026 //I would call it hopscotch.//
F1023 //No I called it beddies//
F1027 //Mm.//
F1023 //too.//
F1025 //What was that game you ca- when you put the thing on the pavement and knocked it?// An it, an it was numbers come up and then ye could hit it further on //an the//
F1023 //Oh I don't remember.//
F1025 bu- but a stick, you know, like and it had numbers on it an whoever, when they hit it off the edge of the pavement like that, //an whoever got the highest number then you hit//
F1024 //[inaudible]//
F1023 //No I don't.//
F1025 //the stick an hi- you were meant tae hit, I cannae mind th- that game,// //mind o that?//
F1023 //I just know beddies//
F1026 //No I don't remember that.//
F1023 //that you drew the chalk on the ground one, two, three,//
F1027 //Mmhm mmhm and you had the Mansion// //polish tin and you'd//
F1023 //four, five, six, seven.// An then you slid it along and then you had to, an you'd an you'd tae jump. //across the boxes.//
F1025 //[inaudible] that was another game.//
F1027 //Yeah.// //Aye.//
F1023 //And doublers of course with the ball, with the ball.//
F1025 //Mmhm.// They were all sissy games though eh? //[laugh]//
F1027 //Well you were playin hockey.// //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1025 //I wis oot playin football wi the boys. [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //I was lucky to//
F1024 //That's the kind of thing I was doing too!//
F1023 //play beddies and doublers cause where I lived//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1023 there wasn't and I was the only child I had absolutely nobody //to play with!//
F1025 //Aw!// //Aw//
F1023 //No. [laugh]//
F1024 //Oh really?//
F1027 //Nae mates Jimmy! [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //I didn't have anybody!//
F1024 //Oh aye.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Dorothy was my nearest and she lived up// //Kinnoull Hill [laugh] so I//
F1025 //[laugh] Heard that before.//
F1023 I had, there was nobody in our road. //And then//
F1054 //By the time you got to the top of there ye wirnae able for nothing.//
F1023 no there was there was nobody on our street, well the terraced it had, there was no other children I was only one.
F1054 Mmhm. I think we're on oor last one noo actually. //Ooh.//
F1023 //So I had to go oot an draw ma beddies masel and just// //play masel.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Aye, but we've no done that, have we?//
F1023 //Batter.//
F1025 //No.//
F1027 //No.// Belted.
F1025 Welly. [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1024 //Welly! [laugh]//
F1026 //Welly! [laugh]// //I suppose thump.//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]// //Mmhm.//
F1026 //Clout.//
F1024 Fair skelp something. //If you've hit it hard you've given it a fair skelp.//
F1023 //Aye, a skelp.// //Gie me a skelp if I went past,//
F1024 //No.//
F1026 //Yeah.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //I wisnae, I've I//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1023 //if I hadnae done whatever I was supposed to do,//
F1054 //Or in case you were even// //thinkin aboot doing anything.//
F1023 //yeah.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1023 //Aye.//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //Poor wee soul on her own. [laugh]// //I can hit yer [inaudible] [laugh]//
F1023 //Aye, aye poor wee soul on her own!//
F1026 Boot ye up the bum. //[inaudible]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh] [?]Unfortunate, this[/?].//
F1026 //Did you not have brothers or sisters?//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1023 No, my mother was a widow. //She wa- my father was killed in//
F1026 //Oh.//
F1023 during the war, my granny was the one that was left to //so if I like had to be off the school for example with mumps, chickenpox or whatever.//
F1025 //Mm.//
F1023 //So yes no brothers or sisters.//
F1024 //Oh.//
F1023 //Yeah.//
F1025 //That's a shame eh? [laugh]//
F1026 //I know.//
F1023 //Well you see.//
F1024 //It's worse//
F1025 //That's sad.// //[laugh]//
F1023 //Yeah, if//
F1024 //now. [laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //yes no broth- and my son's an only one and I have//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1023 to say this that I have no regrets being one. And he has, well I have asked him and he says he's got no regrets being one. But there does come a time in your life I think when yes you do wish you had some like, like my my mother took ill, //I, I was the only one that was there to//
F1026 //Yeah.//
F1023 be there for her, whereas I think if you're one of a big family you can at least help out one another.
F1054 Mmhm.
F1023 //But I have no regrets uh-huh.//
F1026 //I suppose it's what you know as well, I mean I'm I'm one of four and I was the baby,// //ehm and in some ways I would be spoilt and in other ways//
F1023 //Mmhm.//
F1026 it was the opposite, because you got everybody else's hand-me-downs and //old bikes and like//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1026 not gettin to //do music lessons and things cause everybody else had tried it so,//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Mmhm.
F1023 //Yeah.//
F1026 //but I mean I enjoyed being one of four, I can't imagine// //being one.//
F1023 //Not having,//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Well it's the same, you see, I don't know anything else.//
F1025 //Uh-huh.//
F1026 //Yes uh-huh.//
F1023 I don't know anything else, I just was one, that was it. But there's no arguments, you've got no //no fi- see ma husband is one of six,//
F1024 //No well that's true.//
F1023 //and they definitely all had their fall-outs.//
F1026 //[throat]//
F1023 Well I, there's nobody to fall out with me, I just //on my own, you know?//
F1054 //He'll be a bit// practised at fightin and all that well was he no? //[inaudible]//
F1023 //Oh yes.// //Yes definitely. [laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1023 //No, I//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //True.//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1023 you know it's a true saying it's what you've //what you, what you know uh-huh and what you're used to.//
F1026 //What you're used to.//
F1027 //It's what you know, aye.//
F1023 //Aye.//
F1054 //A- anything else that anyone else would say?//
F1027 Well everybody in Perth says ken. //Ken.//
F1025 //Ken, aye that's o- or ben the hoose.//
F1026 //Instead of "you know", it's ken.//
F1025 I mind when I was doin bed and breakfast I said just go ben the hoose, ken! Frank says "They'll no ken whit yer sayin", //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1025 "ben the hoose for yer breakfast". //Ben's a Perth-, he said that's//
F1027 //Mmhm.// //Mmhm yeah, and ken.//
F1025 //a Perth word as well and ken, ken?//
F1026 //And ken.//
F1025 //Ken.//
F1054 //How would you use ken? Give me an example.//
F1027 Oh do ye ken him? //Something like that.//
F1025 //Know, like, know.// //That's a right Perth one.//
F1026 //Even// //at the end of a sentence instead of saying "you know?" you'll go//
F1054 //Uh-huh.//
F1026 //"Ken?"//
F1027 //Ken?//
F1025 //Aye mmhm.//
F1026 //So it's//
F1054 //Aye.//
F1026 and I must admit when I came to Perth I didn't notice I'd picked it up. It was my parents that noticed it. This "ye ken?" Or ken.
F1024 You're saying ye come from Perth, I would say that as well, but that's not what you guys would say. You would say?
F1025 Perth. //Perth.//
F1024 //Aye.// //Perth or Perth, bit different.//
F1025 //Aye, it's like Perth, but it's//
F1024 //You said Perth, it was just//
F1026 //Aye. uh-huh//
F1024 Perth which is what everybody other than //Perth people would say.//
F1026 //Perth, oh right.//
F1024 //Aye, it's Perth really, it's//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1024 not it's not an E it's a
F1026 It's Perth.
F1023 //Perth.//
F1025 //You're you're [inaudible]// //the same.//
F1023 //It's the same.//
F1026 //Yeah.// //Perth.//
F1023 //Where do you come from, you come from Perth?//
F1026 //[cough]//
F1054 //Do any of you ever have bother being understood?// //Give me an example of any time you've had that?//
F1023 //No.//
F1024 //No.//
F1025 //No.//
F1026 //No.//
F1027 //No.// //No.//
F1023 //No.//
F1025 //No, like nowadays.//
F1026 //Well,//
F1025 days. [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1026 //I think only when you're abroad,// //you know, but even in//
F1027 //Aye, but that's the Scottish accent.// //We speak quick when we say something, aye.//
F1023 //I would//
F1025 //Because we're proud of it.//
F1026 //yeah that's yeah, it's the accent.//
F1023 //say that was a fast dialect, I went every summer obviously to visit my//
F1025 //You've got tae slow down.//
F1027 //Dialect. mmhm.//
F1023 grandparents down south and they understood both my mum and I quite easily but they felt that we spoke much faster than them.
F1025 Mmhm. //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1023 //And they were "You'll have tae slow down," but they understood us.//
F1054 Mm. //Right, sorry.//
F1026 //Even things like erm like when we were in Australia,// like when we were speaking to the kids there, ehm we would say things like ehm you know how you would say, "Go and do the messages," //they wouldn't know//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Mmhm.// //Mmhm.//
F1026 //what messages was, it would be the shopping.//
F1027 //Messages meant,// //uh-huh yeah.//
F1026 //I mean just a simple word like that, you know, that we would maybe say something,// and they'd look at ye as if to say //"What's she talkin about?"//
F1023 //They don't say that they//
F1025 //Aye.//
F1054 //Uh-huh.//
F1023 they don't say that down south either, I used to say to ma granny "I'll go and do your messages," she'd say "I have no messages //to give anybody," I says "It's no that kind of messages, it's shopping."//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh] It's shopping.// //Yes.//
F1023 //But th- they don't speak they don't they didn't use that//
F1025 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Mm.//
F1023 //either, uh-huh//
F1026 //But it's it's something that you say unconsciously that// you know, someone else, //they just pick up on it and they haven't got a clue what it is.//
F1023 //I still say I'm going// //ma messages.//
F1025 //Aye, aye, I say that mmhm.//
F1026 //Mmhm.//
F1023 //I very rarely say to anybody//
F1025 //Mmhm going ma messages.//
F1023 yeah, I'm going away to shop.
F1025 //Oh I I never say shopping, no, no.//
F1026 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1025 //No, you have to be in Furcoat Avenue for that! [laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //When I'm going for clothes and things it would be//
F1025 //[laugh]//
F1023 Shopping. //Messages.//
F1024 //shopping, but if it's a food shop then it's your messages.//
F1025 //Aye that's messages.// //Mmhm.//
F1023 //Mmhm.//
F1027 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //I would say errands, like errands,// //you know, it could be Scotland generally, maybe, I'm no sure.//
F1026 //Right.// Mmhm. //[cough]//
F1054 //Can I just get once mair to say who you are, whaur ye live, just one mair time for the linguists.//
F1026 Right, Pam [CENSORED: forename] from Scone.
F1024 Pam [CENSORED: surname] from Scone.
F1054 You had to think about that one, Pam! [laugh]
F1023 Er Olive [CENSORED: surname], originally Perth, now Scone.
F1027 Yvonne [CENSORED: surname], Perth.
F1025 Madge [CENSORED: surname], originally Perth, now Scone. [laugh] //[laugh]//
F1023 //[laugh]//
F1024 //[laugh]//
F1026 //[laugh]//
F1027 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh]//

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APA Style:

BBC Voices Recording: Perth. 2021. In The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow. Retrieved January 2021, from http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=1433.

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"BBC Voices Recording: Perth." The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow, 2021. Web. January 2021. http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=1433.

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Information about Document 1433

BBC Voices Recording: Perth

Audio

Audio audience

Adults (18+)
General public
Informed lay people
Specialists
For gender Mixed
Audience size 1000+

Audio awareness & spontaneity

Speaker awareness Aware
Degree of spontaneity Spontaneous
Special circumstances surrounding speech Spontaneous but discussing a list of words they had thought about previously.

Audio footage information

Year of recording 2005
Recording person id 1060
Size (min) 79
Size (mb) 304

Audio footage series/collection information

Part of series
Contained in BBC Voices Recordings - www.bbc.co.uk/voices

Audio medium

Radio/audio
Web (e.g. audio webcast)

Audio setting

Education
Journalism
Recording venue Kitchen of private house
Geographic location of speech Scone

Audio relationship between recorder/interviewer and speakers

Not previously acquainted
Speakers knew each other Yes

Audio speaker relationships

Friend

Audio transcription information

Transcriber id 689
Year of transcription 2007
Year material recorded 2005
Word count 17146

Audio type

Conversation
General description Conversation centred around a pre-prepared list of words for discussion

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1023
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1940
Age left school 16
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Occupation Retired
Place of birth Dundee
Region of birth W Angus
Birthplace CSD dialect area Ags
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Scone
Region of residence E & SE Perthshire
Residence CSD dialect area Per
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Rep for big company
Father's place of birth Grampound
Father's country of birth England
Mother's occupation Staff trainer
Mother's place of birth Errol
Mother's region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
Scots Yes No No Yes

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1024
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1950
Educational attainment Highers/A-levels
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Place of birth Leith
Region of birth Edinburgh
Birthplace CSD dialect area Edb
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Scone
Region of residence E & SE Perthshire
Residence CSD dialect area Per
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Civil servant, sheriff clerk
Father's place of birth Oakley
Father's region of birth Fife
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Fif
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Secretary
Mother's place of birth Leith
Mother's region of birth Edinburgh
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Edb
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1025
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1940
Place of birth Scone
Region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Scone
Region of residence E & SE Perthshire
Residence CSD dialect area Per
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Plumber and heating engineer
Father's place of birth Kinross
Father's region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Tailoress
Mother's place of birth Scone
Mother's region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1026
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1950
Place of birth Scone
Region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Scone
Region of residence E & SE Perthshire
Residence CSD dialect area Per
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Painter and decorator
Father's place of birth Coupar Angus
Father's region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Factory worker
Mother's place of birth Gort
Mother's country of birth Ireland

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1027
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1950
Educational attainment College
Age left school 15
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Occupation Retired
Place of birth Perth
Region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Perth
Region of residence E & SE Perthshire
Residence CSD dialect area Per
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Letterpress machineman (printer)
Father's place of birth Perth
Father's region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Shop assistant
Mother's region of birth E & SE Perthshire
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Per
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes Every day

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1054

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