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Document 995

Conversation 18: Edinburgh lexicographer on making recordings

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Copyright holder(s): SCOTS Project

Audio transcription

F209 He, well, it was, appar- I didn't realise this, but it was him who had suggested us
F606 Mm
F209 as the consultants in the first place. And er he was very pleased with the the results o the leaflet and he was the one who kept say- "oh well, get her to come down and ma- make recordings."
F606 Mmhm
F209 Then, of course, the museums who are hosting the project, as well as the Forestry Commission, they have, because of the Representations of the People's Act and all the rest of it, recording people is not erm like it was in the old days, the Linguistic Survey, you've //got to//
F606 //No.//
F209 [cough] you've got to tell them you're doin it, you've got to get, record them actually sayin "Ma name's Pauline Cairns, //I come//
F606 //Mmhm//
F209 from Scottish Language Dictionaries. Is it okay if I record you?" And most time, they nod, and it makes me feel like the CID when you say "For the tape, //please". [cough]//
F606 //[laugh] Yeah.// //[cough] [laugh]//
F209 //"Oh aye, hen" [laugh]// And, so what has happened, as I say it's snowballed, and I have to trot down there, and then one neighbour tells the other neighbour and then another neighbour gets quite indignant, because wee Jocky so-and-so kens mair Scots nor we- than Big Sandy. And Big Sandy's wife's, wife's cousin kens mair nor anybody in the hail district. And er it's absolutely fascinatin. And to think, I mean one guy I spoke to, this is just interestin no //from a linguistic//
F606 //[cough]//
F209 or anything point of view.
F606 Mm
F209 His family had lived on the same site since the sixteen-forties.
F606 Uh-huh
F209 And it was this beautiful house. He had a picture of it on his wall, just beside his chair. And he was in his early seventies, so goodness knows what he would have been in the sixties. And his, this little house, it was absolutely beautiful, you know, like the sort of house you draw when you're a a kid, with the door and the four //windows an the slidy-doon roof.//
F606 //Mm//
F209 And I said to him, "But, couldn't you have kept the house?" cause of course when the Forestry Commission comes in and just b- buys up the land, razes everything to the ground, an
F606 Mm
F209 And apparently once a week since the nineteen-sixties, [inaudible] nineteen-sixty-three, sixty-four, He goes up, to the place where his house was, and it was just left there.
F606 Mmhm
F209 The house actually was left. And now it's, the the walls are about three feet high. //And that's all that's//
F606 //S-//
F209 left of it after somethin bein there for over four hundred years.
F606 That's terrible.
F209 And you're like, even in the sixties, the Forestry Commission must have realised they were doin somethin extremely silly. //You know?//
F606 //Yeah, I would// think so, yeah.
F209 But, and, that's only one of them, I don't know and perhaps I should, presumably that's what Ruth's doin, is findin exactly how many //families//
F606 //Mmhm//
F209 and how many people were displaced by the forest, an
F606 Mm
F209 how, erm I mean certainly the economic erm effect on the area, I think, was absolutely monumental, cause you had all these workers comin in from the outside, //an//
F606 //Mmhm//
F209 it all spiralled down because there was one lot of people displaced but another lot of people came in, you know, Irish navvies and things, //to//
F606 //Yeah.//
F209 to er, you think about building a forest, you know, you plant a forest, but there was lots of buildin work an roads //to be laid an//
F606 //Mm// Mmhm
F209 all sorts of, cause it was hill farmin, basically.
F606 Yeah. //Uh-huh//
F209 //Erm// //S-//
F606 //No, I think in that// period, they just knocked things down in the name of improvement. Like, that's when they knocked George Square down, //and then//
F209 //Mm//
F606 half of Glasgow went an. //But,//
F209 //Yeah.//
F606 I mean, it's a shame when it's a family home like that. Yeah.
F209 Yeah. An I mean that was just one, as I say I don't know how //many of them.//
F606 //Mm//
F209 But the the trickle-down was amazin, because a lot of the the farms, the other farms, the ones that were left in the area, they went into bed and breakfast.
F606 Mmhm
F209 Because of course, all these Irish navvies, th- they couldnae go back to erm [tut] Kilmarnock or wherever
F606 Mmhm
F209 they they needed places to stay, so the farms that were left, they got quite a lot o money //because these//
F606 //Yeah.//
F209 guys were bein paid, at the time an absolute fortune. You know, they were gettin thirty an forty pounds a week, which was unheard of I mean even yer Edinburgh lawyer would have thought that was a good wage //then.//
F606 //Mmhm//
F209 [cough] And these guys were just gettin a fortune.
F606 Yeah.
F209 And of course the peo- th- this caused resentment with the people who'd been turfed out their farms because they're like "Hm, we've got our money, but they're still gettin money." //[laugh]//
F606 //Mmhm [laugh]//
F209 So, it's it's it's been a fascinatin if exhaustin exercise. But what I have discovered is a lovely wee hotel in Strathaven, //which is//
F606 //Mmhm//
F209 super.
F606 [inhale]
F209 And eh, it's quite nice to go down there, an go down on the Friday, and it's like a wee holiday,
F606 Yeah.
F209 come back on the Sunday, //so it's quite//
F606 //Uh-huh// //Good.//
F209 //It's quite nice.//
F606 [tut] Thank you.

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APA Style:

Conversation 18: Edinburgh lexicographer on making recordings. 2021. In The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow. Retrieved January 2021, from http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=995.

MLA Style:

"Conversation 18: Edinburgh lexicographer on making recordings." The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow, 2021. Web. January 2021. http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=995.

Chicago Style

The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech, s.v., "Conversation 18: Edinburgh lexicographer on making recordings," accessed January 2021, http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=995.

If your style guide prefers a single bibliography entry for this resource, we recommend:

The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. 2021. Glasgow: University of Glasgow. http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk.

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Information about Document 995

Conversation 18: Edinburgh lexicographer on making recordings

Audio

Audio audience

Adults (18+)
For gender Mixed
Audience size 1

Audio awareness & spontaneity

Speaker awareness Aware
Degree of spontaneity Spontaneous
Special circumstances surrounding speech Participants were asked to talk about work connected with Scottish Language Dictionaries

Audio footage information

Year of recording 2005
Recording person id 606
Size (min) 6
Size (mb) 29

Audio setting

Work
Recording venue Office
Geographic location of speech Edinburgh

Audio relationship between recorder/interviewer and speakers

Friend
Professional relationship
Speakers knew each other Yes

Audio speaker relationships

Friend
Professional relationship

Audio transcription information

Transcriber id 718
Year of transcription 2005
Year material recorded 2005
Word count 920

Audio type

Conversation

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 209
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1950
Educational attainment College
Age left school 16
Upbringing/religious beliefs Atheist
Occupation Lexicographer
Place of birth Musselburgh
Region of birth Midlothian
Birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Edinburgh
Region of residence Edinburgh
Residence CSD dialect area Edb
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Painter
Father's place of birth Portobello
Father's region of birth Edinburgh
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Edb
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Printer
Mother's place of birth Musselburgh
Mother's region of birth Midlothian
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
Scots Yes Yes Yes Yes Work, home and everyday use.

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 606
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1940
Educational attainment University
Age left school 18
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Occupation Academic
Place of birth Edinburgh
Region of birth Midlothian
Birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Glasgow
Region of residence Glasgow
Residence CSD dialect area Gsw
Country of residence Scotland
Father's place of birth Leith
Father's region of birth Midlothian
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's place of birth Edinburgh
Mother's region of birth Midlothian
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area midLoth
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes All
Scots No Yes No Yes Work

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