SCOTS
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Document 1430

BBC Voices Recording: Hawick

Author(s): N/A

Copyright holder(s): BBC, SCOTS Project

Audio transcription

F1054 Start on this side //here.//
M1010 //Right// Well, I'm Dave [CENSORED: surname] an I've lived in Hawick aw my life. I'm comin up now for seeventy-five year auld.
F1011 I'm Madge [CENSORED: surname], [laugh] a Teri an a guitterbluid, and eh I've lived here for seventy-six years.
F1054 Sorry just a second Madge, there's a problem wi my cable there. Ooh that's it back again. It's been playin up these past couple o days. Can I get you to do that once more Madge if that's okay?
F1011 I'm Madge [CENSORED: surname], I'm a Teri an a guitterbluid. I've lived here aw my life for sixty-si- seventy-six years.
F1054 What's a Teri an a guitterbluid?
F1011 I was born in Hawick but the gui- the guitterbluid born in the west end o Hawick, [laugh] the best pairt. [laugh]
M1013 Bert [CENSORED: surname] an I've just reached my eightieth birthday, an I've been in Hawick aw my life, except when I was in the forces just, that's it.
M1012 Ian [CENSORED: surname], I've been in Hawick all my life but I'm just a bairn, I'm just fifty-twae.
F1054 Very good. Right, let's start off in the top left-hand corner with words for 'pleased' if that's okay. Anybody think o anything there?
M1013 Er agreeable.
F1054 Is that somethin you'd use doon here?
M1013 Oh maybe no it c- it could, it could be eh coorser is it a wee bit //[laugh] is it no? [laugh] No no, no no//
M1012 //wh- what word i-//
F1054 //I'll tell you that's another thing, dinna be feared tae swear [inaudible] if it's somethin you'd use or hear folk usin you just tell me it, we're just startin here.//
M1010 //That's [inaudible] that way roond aye.//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1013 //Agreeable, pleased, what, what?//
F1054 Any other ones?
F1011 Fair tain on.
M1012 //Fair tain on, aye.//
M1010 //Fair tain on, I've got fair tain on written doon an aa oh well.//
M1013 //[laugh] Well//
F1054 //What does that mean?//
M1010 //Y-y- yer//
F1011 //Ta- taken up with it, tain on, taken up.// //Fair tain on.//
F1054 //Okay.// //Ss that a word that that's kind of just you guys would use or is it a word that a lot of folk use?//
F1011 //Pleased.// //Aye, I think [inaudible] tain on, quite common, yes.//
M1012 //It's widely widely used in Hawick.//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1012 //It's it's it's threi words really, it's f- 'fair', we we use the word 'fair'//
F1011 //Aye, 'tain on'//
M1013 //A lot o folk use that word.//
M1012 a lot to intensify meanin. eh 'fair' means 'very' an an 'tain on' would be taken on ehm, taken up with the the situation.
M1013 //Aye.//
F1054 //Good, that's a good one, anything you thought of Dave?//
M1010 Eh ehm well 'fair tain on' is the same as what I've pit doon for w- I-, that Madge has pitten doon, eh er I think that's that's the yin that's the word I would yaise that's a phrase I would yaise, fair tain on. //Okay?//
F1054 //Very good,// very good, what aboot the opposite o that, what aboot 'annoyed'?
M1010 //Eh//
M1013 //Foamin.// //I'm fair foamin.//
F1011 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
M1010 //Aye, mmhm, aye.//
F1054 //That's a nice word, I like that.//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //Roosed. [laugh]// //Mm//
M1012 //Aye, yes.//
F1054 //An is that kinda more common than foamin?//
M1012 //Did ye see, ye see Bert said, fair foamin again, there?//
F1011 //Aye, really.//
M1013 //Aye.//
M1012 //So fa- fair is used a lot tae intensify,//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
M1012 //but I'd roosed. [laugh]//
M1013 //Fair, fair foamin, I//
F1054 //It's the sam as like in the North East, isn't it?// //Fair forfochen an [inaudible] maybe it's a family thing.//
M1010 //Right.//
F1011 //Uh-huh.//
M1013 //That's right uh-huh that's right uh-huh.//
M1010 Just the same as, as as eh as oh what they said [inaudible] ye ken eh eh just the same words, just 'roosed' I've pit doon here, 'roosed', ye ken? Ye can pit a v- variety o things [inaudible] an aw like ye ken but 'roosed' is the main thing that I would yaise if somebody or somethin was annoyin us. I would say, "Oh he made mei gey roosed", ye ken?
F1054 Very good, very good, what aboot 'tired'?
M1010 Eh.
M1013 Whacked oot. //I'm whacked oot.//
F1011 //Uh-huh.// //Wabbit.//
M1012 //I'd//
M1010 //Wabbit, an aw, 'fa- fair fair wabbit'.//
F1011 //Wabbit or knackered.//
M1010 Fair fair wabbit, if you're tired.
M1012 //f- 'fair dune' an 'jeegered'.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 //Fair dune.//
M1012 Jeegered.
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1054 //Yeah, good ane, uh-huh.// Ehm what aboot 'hot'?
M1012 //S- swee-//
M1013 //Sweaty// //He- 'het', 'het'.//
M1012 //s- 'sweety, sweety' swee- swee- s-//
M1010 //'Het', I've got 'het' aye.//
F1011 //I've got 'het'.// //[inaudible] 'gey het' [laugh] aye.//
M1010 //I've got, I've got 'het' an aw or 'gey het' if you pit yer fingers intae intae a bowl o water, ye ken, 'Oh that's gey het, that!',//
F1054 What's what's 'gey'?
M1010 'Gey'? //It's just a//
M1012 //'Gey's' anither, 'gey's' anither sort o similar tae 'fair',//
F1011 //Oh//
M1012 an it depends how how ye say it ehm yer inflection could change the word 'gey', cause ehm if ye ask somebody if they enjoyed it, they might say it was 'gey guid' or they might say 'gey guid', an that would change the meanin, first yin would be, 'gey guid' would be eh enjoyed it //'gey guid' would mean 'it was alright'.//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
M1012 //Mmhm no.//
F1054 //Cause, eh I ken would 'gey' means but then folk in England [inaudible].// Ehm what aboot 'cold'?
M1010 //Just, just, just 'cauld'.//
F1011 //Well 'cauld', C.A.U.L.D. or, I'm a cauldrife craiter actually// I feel the cauld, so I'm a cauldrife craiter. //Cauldrife craiter aye, or nithered.//
F1054 //Cauldrife craiter?// //Uh-huh.//
M1012 //'Nithered', I had 'nithered'.//
M1010 //Aye 'nithered' would be anither yin.//
F1011 //Some people say 'nithered, nithered'.//
M1012 //An//
M1013 //'Shiverin' [laugh] 'shiverin'.//
M1012 an that would situation would be be caused because the weather was 'snell'. //'Snell' means 'cauld', it's 'gey snell'.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 //'Snell' that's a [inaudible] 'snell's' a good word//
M1012 //Aye, ye wouldnae say, 'I'm snell'.//
F1054 //But you spik aboot the snell for the weather an then cauld for somebody.//
F1011 No. //[inaudible] the weather's snell [inaudible]//
M1012 //But ye would say 'it's snell' uh-huh the weather's snell, but you personally wouldna be snell.//
M1013 //'It's snell'.//
M1010 Aye if ye, if ye met onybody on the street on a frosty morning ye ken or a fros-, 'Aye Tam, it's gey snell the day, isn't it?' Ye ken ye would say that tae them ye ken, ye'd say, 'aye it is', ye ken?
F1054 Good ehm so we've done 'hot', 'cold', 'unwell'?
M1010 //'No weel', aye.//
F1011 //Well, 'no weel', or 'ailin'.// 'Ailin'. [laugh]
M1013 'Poorly, very poorly'.
M1012 Eh 'hard up', //which causes confusion,//
M1010 //Aye, 'hard up'.//
M1012 //because 'hard up' tae Eng- a lot o folk would mean 'not well off' in a monetary sense,//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1013 //That's right.//
M1012 but if somebody's really no weel they would say they're gey hard up.
M1010 //It's the same as what Ian's just said,//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
M1010 eh 'gey hard up', I remember eh a lot o years ago there a woman caed Jessie Bell, an she came doon tae work in Hawick frae Dumfries an she'd never heard the word, th- or the phrase eh 'gey hard up' an she thought somebody oh 'Tam Scott's gey hard up', an she thought, 'Oh puir soul, he must no have very much money, he must no have, eh he must, ken he's he's puir, ye ken, he's he's he's nae money, he's no gettin money in an thing like that an him wi a big faimly an thing like that but that's what she fund oot later on, she says, 'I fund oot later on', eh when she said she said that, she says that's what that's what it meant it didnae mean somebody hard up for money or owt ye ken, it was just, ye ken. //'Gey gey gey hard up'//
M1012 //Yeah.//
F1054 //[inaudible] yeah.// So that's 'pleased', 'tired', 'unwell', 'hot', 'cold' and 'annoyed', we've covered all that I think //now.//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
F1054 'To throw'
M1012 Thraw.
F1011 Thraw.
M1013 To chuck.
M1010 //Mm aye, 'chuck'//
F1011 //Chuck, thraw.//
F1054 So pretty unanimous on that, 'play truant'?
M1012 Skive. Skive. //Aye uh-huh.//
F1011 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //That's somethin you'll ken aa aboot as a teacher, Ian.//
M1012 //Mmhm.//
M1010 //Dip- dippy.//
F1011 //Uh-huh I say 'hookey' as well. [laugh]//
M1013 //'Play hookey'.//
M1010 Oo caed it 'dippy' when I was a boy. //Ye playin dippy frae the scuil.//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
M1010 That's what oo caed it, 'dippy'.
F1054 That's fine, I've never heard ehm 'hookey' or 'dippy', //yet in Scotland in all the places I've//
M1010 //Aye, aye, aye.//
F1011 //Aye uh-huh.//
M1012 //They're no yaised now.//
F1054 //been.// //No.//
M1010 //Aye.//
M1012 The present generation wouldnae wouldnae yaise them. I've heard them now that they're mentioned but they didnae spring tae my mind immediately. //Mm.//
F1054 //But I'm sure I've heard Americans say 'playin hookey'.//
M1012 //Aye, could be.//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //Aye, I [inaudible] I think I dinnae ken if it'll mean the same thing as what it does here, mind.// //But that was aye when I was at the scuil, 'Oh he's played hookey, him'.//
F1011 //[inaudible] [laugh]// //Oh no [inaudible] think aboot playin hookey.//
M1012 //[laugh]//
M1010 //I play, I couldnae affo- I couldnae affo-//
M1013 //[laugh] No mei mind. [laugh]//
F1054 //[inaudible] hookey, too much to do.//
M1013 Did ye hear that, I said, no mei mind. Did did ye understand that?
F1054 I ken what that means. //No- not in my memory//
F1011 //Oo darenae, the generation oo darenae play hookey because it wasnae just the scuil//
M1013 //[laugh] No, no, no, no, no, no.// //Mmhm.//
F1011 //it was yer parents as weel.// //They would have a go at ye if they thought ye were playin hookey, uh-huh yes, aye there was discipline in//
M1010 //Oh aye, aye, aye [inaudible].// //Aye.//
F1011 //in the hame in they days as weel as at the scuil.//
F1054 Ehm 'to sleep'.
M1010 Eh, to 'sleep' is tae 'dover', //ye fa asleep on the chair ye ken yer//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1010 doverin. //Aye, 'hover doverin'.//
M1012 //Or 'hover doverin', 'hover doverin's' when ye're sort o nid nid noddin, ye're aboot, ye're half-wakin half-sleepin,//
F1011 //'Hover doverin'.//
M1012 ye're 'hover doverin' or ye're in a 'dwam'.
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 //That's// //that's that's just the same thing 'hover'.//
M1012 //But that's no actually sleepin.//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //Aye.// //Aye I would say the same, I've, I've also got 'forty winks'.//
M1013 //'Hover'.// //[laugh]//
M1010 //Aye.//
M1012 //Mm no.//
F1011 //Mm.//
F1054 //And is that something that folk would, young folk would use, 'doverin'?// //Ye do mair o it.//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //No, when ye when ye're at my age ye yaiise it. [laugh]// //[laugh] Mair at my age ye would yaise it, aye.//
F1054 //[laugh]//
M1010 //A lot of words have been lost, aye.//
F1011 //A lot o words have been lost of course haven't they, because of people comin an goin nowadays.// //Mm.//
M1013 //That's right.//
F1054 What aboot 'to play a game'?
M1012 //Just just 'play', aye.//
M1010 //Well//
F1011 //We uised tae gaun oot 'to play'.//
M1013 //'Join in', ye just join in.// //[inaudible]//
M1012 //[inaudible] aye, aye.//
F1011 //Just to gaun oot an pl- just to play, mmhm.//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
M1010 //Roonders, we we used tae play roonders, or ye could play kick the can.// //Eh [?]cockarossie[/?].//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1010 //[?]Cockarossie[/?] was f-, sidesaway that was anither popular thing.//
M1013 //[inaudible]//
F1054 Tell me about kick the can. //A lot//
M1010 //Kick the can, well,// ah ye had sides ye see an maybe there were eight [inaudible] //see? Fower tae this, eh ken,//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1010 an ye aa, there's somebody was left an ye ye huntit, they went away an hid an ye huntit them oot, ye see? An ye says, 'Right, Tam [inaudible] I've got ye', one, two, three, an off an whoever was first tae kick the can now if he ran by mei an kicked the can I'd tae gaun away an hide an he was left tae tae dae it till everybody had a go.
F1011 //Used tae play beds,//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1011 somethin, hopscotch they would say but we we caed it beds, used to chalk on the road, ye got a piece o chalk an chalk the beds on the road an play //they were the days of course you could play on the roads cause there was nae traffic then. [laugh]//
M1010 //Oh yeah, aye.//
F1011 We had a grand time, an skippin, we had a skippin rope it was good fun, and roonders of course us- an the boys of course used tae play bools, //in the middle of the road, bools.//
M1010 //Aye [inaudible].//
M1013 //Bools, aye, an a trolley used to, we used tae play wi a// well she's gaein back a lang time at one time ye could come doon my street, right tae the top right tae the bottom ye'd never see any cars. An ye got on this trolley //an oh there was a whole lot o trolleys of course,//
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 an a an an the, and oh it was it was really great fun and a gird //used tae play wi the gird playin wi the gird, if yer mither, if ye we- had a message//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1013 yer mither would say, 'Away along tae the store ye would take yer gird wi ye, //an make it run along, it was great,//
F1011 //mmhm//
M1013 great fun.
M1012 I wrote a poem caed 'Doon oor close an up oor stair' a verse of which sums up a lot o that, '[?]Cockorossie[/?], off oo ran beds, guesses, bools an kick the can, [?]capagush[/?] an gainin grund, skatin on the curlin pond, girds would keep oo gaun a while sledgin doon the quarter mile they were the ploys o yesteryear doon oor close an up oor stair'. //So ca- [?]capagush[/?]//
F1011 //[inaudible] should read the whole thing.//
F1054 //That's lovely [inaudible].// //Read the whole thing.//
M1012 //I I can dae I'll dae the whole thing at the end we'll let them away cause they've heard it often afore.//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1012 [?]capagush[/?] was when ye the water's runnin doon the the gutter an ye pitten yer foot in an eh stoppin the water an //[?]capagush[/?].//
F1011 //Aye. [laugh]//
F1054 //[inaudible] good.//
F1011 Somebody pitten matchsticks at the top //sailin doon the gutter. [laugh]//
M1010 //Aye we used tae we used tae sail matchsticks doon as well, an oo played//
M1013 //That's right.//
M1010 //oo played wi oor little Dinkys doon doon the//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1010 eh doon the gutters, ken. //Dinky toys doon the gutters, ye ken an oo had oo had [?]paper[/?] [inaudible] an aw,//
F1011 //aye//
M1010 //oo oo oo did the paper [inaudible] in the summertime, it was guid that, it was really fun it was a game.//
M1013 //Oh [inaudible] worth twae.// Used tae get them papes an used tae dye them an the the dyed yins was was worth mair than the ordinary papes. //That's right. [laugh]//
M1010 //Aye [laugh] aye.//
F1011 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
M1013 //Aye that's ri- uh-huh.//
F1054 //Even I'm slightly lost here, normally I can manage most o the accents but I'm slightly lost here, ehm 'to hit hard'.//
F1011 //Oh well, 'thump'.//
M1013 //'Thump'.//
M1012 //'Skelp'.//
M1010 //'Skelp, skelp', aye, 'skelp'.//
F1011 //Oh I've got 'punch, punch'.//
M1013 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //Yeah I'd say 'a skelp' as well, ehm// that's us done aw them yins, I think, right, 'rich'?
M1012 //'Weel off'.//
M1010 //'Weel off', aye.//
M1013 //'Loaded'.//
M1010 //[laugh] 'Loaded'. [laugh]//
F1011 //[laugh] 'Loaded' I've got 'loaded'.//
M1010 //Just I've got 'weel off' aye, yes, aye 'weel off'.//
F1054 //Now that's interestin// //cause 'loaded' to me sounds quite a modern one an I suppose years ago naebody had that much//
F1011 //Oh it is.//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //No no no, no no no, Ian maybe.// //[laugh] No no 'loaded' that's//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 that's what you would say that was mair or less modern money like, modern talk that.
F1054 What aboot the opposite, 'lacking money'?
F1011 Ehm 'hard up'.
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 //'Skinned'// //[laugh] 'skint' or 'skinned'.//
M1010 //'Skint'.//
F1054 //So is that 'skinned'?//
M1012 //'Skint' wi a T.//
M1010 //Aye I I put it wi a T., aye.// //Aye I spelt it S.K.I.N.T., skint.//
M1013 //'Skint', 'skint', uh-huh.//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1054 //'Drunk'//
F1011 'Sozzled'.
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 //'Fou'// //[laugh]//
M1012 //'Bluttered'.//
M1010 //[inaudible] 'bluttered'.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1010 'Yin ower mony'. //'Yin ower mony'.//
F1011 //Uh-huh.//
M1010 //That's right.//
F1054 //One too many.// //Very good, yeah, oh is it what's the most common ones for 'drunk' these days, do you know?//
M1010 //aye// //[laugh] [inaudible] aye, aye.//
M1012 //[laugh]//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //'Pissed, pissed', [laugh] that's the maist common yin.//
F1054 //Dinnae be feared tae swear cause it's pairt o language too [inaudible].//
M1010 That's the maist common yin aye just the same as what Bert just said, aye. //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //Okay good, what aboot 'pregnant'?//
M1010 //Expectin.//
F1011 //Expeckin.// //[laugh]//
M1010 //Ex- expeckin, aye.//
M1013 //[inaudible]// I put it more genteel, I said 'fruitful'. //[laugh]//
M1012 //Just 'expeckin' I think would be the yin.//
M1010 //[laugh], aye//
F1011 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh] I've no had that one yet Bert.// //'Attractive'?//
M1013 //'Fruitful' I put.//
M1012 'Smairt' //eh//
M1013 //Another fancy word, 'alluring'.// //Oh oh that's a word I would use [laugh] aye [laugh].//
M1012 //[laugh]//
M1010 //[laugh]//
F1011 //[inaudible] [laugh]//
F1054 //Is that one you'd use Bert? [laugh] Are you serious? You'd say,// //'She's a very alluring', 'alluring'.//
M1012 //Aye. [laugh]//
M1013 //'Oh she is, she's a topper, she's a topper.// //[laugh] 'Smasher'.//
M1010 //Aye, aye, aye.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //'Guid lookin'.//
M1010 Eh gey plai- eh what did ye say it was that, //eh 'attractive'? 'Bonnie'.//
M1012 //'Attractive'.//
F1054 //'Attractive'.//
M1012 //Aye, that's right.//
M1010 //'Gey bonnie',//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1010 ken? Aye.
F1054 What aboot the opposite o that, aboot 'unattractive'?
M1012 //Ehm.//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //[inaudible]// //I just put down 'plain'.//
M1012 //[inaudible] got an actual word f-// //Aye.//
M1010 //I mean gey, gey plain ehm,//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
M1013 //Plain Jane.//
M1010 aye, 'gey, gey plain'. //Eh i- in in my younger day//
M1013 //'Plain Jane' I put//
M1010 eh lassies used tae speak aboot a bloke if they seen him, 'Oh //he's a right hunk him', ye ken, when I was a young laddie, ken, when I was young, ken.//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1012 //[inaudible] Hawick me-, Hawick men//
M1010 //'He's a right hunk'//
M1012 wouldnae be ower fl- floory in their eh they would never, a Hawick man would never tell his wife she was gorgeous. If she says, 'How do I look?', he he would say, 'Awright' //Right, that's, we havenae got, the whole language hasnae got ostentatious words//
M1010 //[laugh] Aye, aye.//
F1011 //Aye. [laugh]//
M1013 //[laugh]//
M1012 eh words that conjure up eh //ye know high praise, they dinnae exist in oor language. Mmhm.//
M1010 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //But that's interestin cause you gave me quite a few words for 'attractive' but you couldnae think o ony for 'unattractive'.//
F1011 Well, no very nice, mmhm.
F1054 That's good, that's encouraging, right so we've done 'lacking money', we've done 'rich', 'left-handed'?
F1011 //'Geggy'//
M1013 //'Skellyjoukit'.// //That's right.//
M1012 //[laugh]//
F1011 //[laugh]//
F1054 //That's a new word.//
M1013 Onybody when oo was playin onbody that was left handit, I mean //yin time even at scuils they used tae try an make them yaise their right hand.//
M1010 //Aye.//
M1012 //mmhm//
M1013 //But onybody that was left-handit we used tae ca them 'skellyjoukit'.//
M1010 //Or 'kerijoukit', 'kerihaundit'//
F1011 //Well 'geggyhanded' mm//
M1010 ke-, 'kerihaundit', eh that came frae the Kerrs at Fernyhurst eh they were supposed to be eh left-handit. And they had the tower an they had this this this stair in the in the opposite direction so if they were attacked by onybody away back in the Reivers times they could fight left-haundit on their stair cause it was shapit a different way.
F1054 Mm that's very interestin, you've used anither one as weel, eh //somethin similar tae Bert's one but slightly different, 'skelly'?//
M1010 //Aye eh// //'kerihandit', 'kerihandit'//
M1013 //[inaudible]//
F1054 //But was there anither one?// //No? Maybe not, okay.//
M1010 //oh ge- aye.//
F1011 //I said 'geggyhandit' mmhm mmhm.//
F1054 We've done attra-, 'insane'.
M1013 'Loony', //he's a loony, mmhm.//
M1012 //No// //'no wyce' [inaudible].//
F1011 //No wyce [laugh] uh-huh aye, no wyce.//
F1054 //Is that really the common one?//
M1010 An 'daft' //for 'insane', aye.//
M1012 //[inaudible]// we use the sorta 'no the full shillin' kinda general English ken the 'twae sandwiches short o a picnic' kinda stuff, //'twae horses short o a rideoot' that would be a Hawick ane eh.//
M1010 //[laugh]//
M1013 //[laugh]//
M1010 //[inaudible] aye, eh.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
F1054 //Hunting country of course.// //Ehm 'moody', Bert do you have 'moody'//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1013 'Sullen'. 'Sullen'.
F1011 'Up an doon'.
M1010 //Eh 'gey dour'.//
M1013 //[inaudible]// 'Gey dour' aye [inaudible].
M1012 //But 'gey dour' would only be some o the time cause if they're moody moody some o the time they wouldnae be gey dour.//
M1010 //Aye, aye, aye, that's right.// //Ye're right enough there, aye.//
M1012 //Mmhm.// No, I me- I dinnae think oo've got a an exact equivalent.
M1010 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //Okay that's fine.// So 'moody', 'insane', 'attractive', 'pregnant', 'drunk', 'lacking money', 'unattractive', 'left-handed', 'rich', good we're right the way round that one, then doon tae 'inside an ootside', 'to rain lightly'?
M1012 'Smirr'. //A smirr [inaudible].//
M1013 //'Drizzle'.//
F1011 'Liddesdale drow'. //[laugh] Yeah.//
M1010 //Aye, aye.//
M1013 //'Liddesdale drow' aye.//
F1054 //That's a new one, what's that one Madge?//
F1011 A Liddesdale drow, that's up the Newc- the the Newcastletown way you know an there's a lot o hills aroond an they get a lot o ye ken mist and and rain there and oo ca it a Liddesdale drow.
M1010 Eh 'drizzle'. 'Drizzle'
F1054 Tell me Madge wi your one eh do a lot o folk say that?
M1012 //[inaudible] maybe.//
F1011 //I think it's kinda auld fashioned a wee bit, aye.//
M1012 An same wi a smirr, I was gaun tae read ye a poem o my faither's,
F1054 Good.
M1012 caed 'Wet Day' which covers a lot o //the, need tae find it first, de-de-de-de, oh,//
F1054 //Oh that'd be brilliant [inaudible].// //Tak yer time Ian.//
M1012 //oh.// Right we're off, it's just quite short. 'As oo gaed oot frae [?]Buzzles[/?] tae climb the bowden brae, a smirr o rain was fallin that bid tae spoil the day, an ere oo passed the Whitrigg road a mirky harp came doon, it smoored the muckle Eildons, an blanketed Newtoon, the weet seeped throw oor bonnets, an lashed oor smartin cheeks, it drenched oor flappin jaickets an draigled sair oor breeks, but ower the brace o cheery a chiel came whistlin free, an sallied in the by gaun, 'Aye, soft a bit', says he. My feet were fairly chorkin, inside my platchin shin, but drookit tae the very sirk I couldnae raise a froon. I watched the clarkin hobnails, taes pointin tae the sky, an yelled against the wild wind 'Aye, soft a bit', says I.
F1054 So, 'soft a bit', //then?//
M1012 //Just means it's wet,//
F1011 //[inaudible]// //[inaudible]//
M1012 //'soft a bit', I've got quite a few//
M1013 //Isn't it lovely, soft.//
F1054 //That's lovely, very [inaudible].//
M1012 there like ken 'chorkin', 'platchin', //'drookit', they're oor oor words words for bein wet.//
M1013 //That's a grand that's a grand word, 'platchin'.//
M1010 //'Platchit' [inaudible] oo get that when oo're walkin the hills Bert.//
F1011 //[laugh] Aye platchit, drookit [inaudible] aye [laugh].//
F1054 //[inaudible] speak aboot pletchin through gutter,// //[inaudible]//
F1011 //Aye, aye, platchin.//
M1013 //Aye platchin, platchin, aye, that's right.// //Uh-huh.//
F1011 //Aye, yes.//
F1054 //Okay ehm good,// 'to rain heavily', then.
F1011 Mm.
M1013 It's fair teemin. //Fair teemin.//
M1010 //Mmhm.//
F1011 //It's teemin,// //that's right, 'teemin' I would say.//
M1010 //Aye or 'pourin'.// //Fair, fair teemin, aye.//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
F1054 Ian you'd said
M1012 'Pourin' or 'stottin', ehm //mm mmhm aye, yes you could have//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 //That's right.//
F1054 //Yeah I had 'stottin' for a lot o things, it means 'good' it means [inaudible], it means rainin.//
M1012 //'She's a she's a stotter', that would do it for//
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 //Stotter. [laugh]//
F1011 //'Peltin, peltin'.//
F1054 //Okay [inaudible].//
M1010 //'Peltin doon', aye.//
F1011 //'Peltin doon, peltin doon', mmhm,//
M1013 //[inaudible]// //'It's fair peltin doon'.//
F1011 //mmhm.//
F1054 'Toilet'.
F1011 'Lavvy'.
M1013 'The duffy'.
M1012 //'Waiter closet'//
M1010 //Aye.// 'Waiter closet'.
F1011 //Mmhm.//
M1013 //There's quite a number o words, there's quite a number ye could use, in fact fact ye could ca it the 'bog'.//
F1054 //I havenae heard 'duffy' before.//
M1012 //Mm aye. [laugh]//
M1013 //I've heard it caed the bog afore.// Yes, aye.
F1054 Good.
M1013 An the nav- the naval expression was 'the heads', go tae the heads when I was in the forces, go tae the heads. //It's no Hawick like.//
F1054 //What about// aye what one's kinda most common hereaboot?
M1012 eh
M1010 //[inaudible]//
F1011 //[inaudible] 'bathrooms' now [laugh]//
M1013 //We're aw p- we're a better [inaudible] off now, we're a t- we're aw 'toilet' an an 'bathrooms', we're aw better off now// //but 'the bog' I think 'the bog', some folk still use 'the bog' an 'the duffy', aye.//
M1010 //[inaudible] aye, aye.//
F1011 //Uh-huh mm aye, well there use tae be a// a lot o tenements in Hawick an you know there was big families, could be up tae seventy folk usin a couple o //lavatories at the back door mmhm that's//
M1010 //Aye, share the toilets, aye.// //Aye, ye had tae share.//
F1054 //Good.// What about 'a narrow walkway between or alongside buildings'?
M1012 //'Vennel'.//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //Just caed it a 'lane' I would just caed it a lane I wo-// //A 'close' aye.//
M1012 //'Vennel' or a 'close' or a 'pend'.//
M1010 //Ca it a 'lane' or//
F1011 //Mmhm.// //That's right we've quite a lot o pends in Hawick really//
M1010 //A 'pend' aye.//
M1013 //Yeah that's right yeah, mmhm.//
F1054 //[inaudible]// //Is that the name o places ye ken, they'll name somethin//
F1011 //[inaudible]// //Lane.//
M1012 //Well there's a//
M1013 //[inaudible] a lane, ye ye get a//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
M1012 //cl- closes an vennels are are actual street names in the//
F1011 //Closes.//
M1012 //we've got closes in Hawick we've got ve- we haven't got a vennel, we've got there's a vennel in Jedart an Peebles//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1012 //ehm//
F1011 //mmhm//
M1012 pend, we've got a lot o pends but nane o them are actually //caed that in officially, uh-huh.//
M1010 //Aye, aye, the Roond Close, uh-huh.//
F1011 //Well the [inaudible] Close ye ken, ye got the Roond Close an the Croon Close and// //we've a lot o places like that that eh//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //you know they're they're really eh it's a pend and and then it opens oot intae a wide space usually, aye.//
M1013 //Mmhm mmhm.//
F1054 Good, right intae the hoose, ehm the main room with your T.V. in it.
M1010 Just a 'kitchen' just //aye a 'kitchen'.//
F1011 //Well nowadays it's a 'livin room' but at yin time// ye had a bed an they cooked in there and //it was just generally the kitchen. [laugh]//
M1012 //Aye.//
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 I I just put down 'livin room' but //as she was sayin everything used tae gaen under the bed//
F1011 //Uh-huh.//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //ye didnae have wardrobes or presses in them days,// //tae pit everything i- aw yer claes an yer//
M1010 //[inaudible]// //[inaudible]//
F1011 //It was aw ablow the kitchen bed. [laugh]//
M1013 //beet polishes an a that, it was a under the bed, that's right, really that's right, aye.// //Ye should gie her a couple o lines o that, go an gie her a couple o lines o that.//
M1012 //Right, dae a bit o the [inaudible] 'Ablow the Kitchen Bed'.//
F1054 //Yeah!//
F1011 'When spring come aroond it was my dread tae clean ablow the kitchen bed, o aa the jobs that are accursed, I'll lay a bet yon was the worst. Lift the tyke that's filled wi flocks, mind the bed was up on blocks, tak yer time an clean each spring wi a cloot that's dipped in paraffin, pull oot my granny's blanket kist, the fishin rod that never fished, the tin trunk wantin a handle, a wooden tub wi mended flannel, a pair o beets were aye ower neat, twae walkin sticks an a roller-skate, the tuil box oh my faither's pride an oh the things that were inside, heel plates, [inaudible] an reels [inaudible], carpet tacks an wheels, hammers an chisels, a cobbler's last, an a chappin clock that went ower fast, a broken knife belonged tae Sandy, and things that just might come in handy, an last of aa the waddin silver that never saw the licht o day, till someyin died or mairied or had a young yin, then ye sooked the [?]ooder[/?] oot an ye got a washin cloot a pail o water some elbow grease, a scrubbin brush and on yer knees, ye scrubbed that flair until it shone, and every speck o dirt was gone, then athing was pit back again, an there ye kent it wad remain till the next spring clean time came roond again, but o it was fine tae say, 'What a day I've had, I've cleaned ablow the kitchen bed'. //[laugh] I didnae hic either [laugh]//
M1012 //Well done, great.//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //That's good isn't it? [inaudible]//
F1054 //Wow that was fabulous! Thank you Madge. [inaudible] What does 'hic' mean?//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
F1011 //Well 'hic' ken just a hiccup really an an I// //ye know didnae hesitate on anything neither. [laugh]//
M1013 //That's good, yeah, lovely.//
F1054 //That was lovely, no pauses, no hesitations.//
M1012 Great, that was it was 'sittin room', 'livin room' would be kinda interchangeable for the main room but that's modern because //some folk had nowadays have a livin room an a sittin room but back in the auld days ye had just the yin room where ye did everything//
F1011 //mmhm mmhm//
M1012 //mmhm mmhm.//
M1013 //Oh yes, I understand, I understand.//
F1054 //Mm great, great, just be aware ehm wi these bits o paper if ye try an no rustle them that'd be a right help in case [inaudible] ehm// what aboot 'the soft, long soft seat in the main room'?
M1013 'Sofa'.
M1010 //[inaudible]//
F1011 //'The couch'.//
M1010 Aye, 'the sofa'.
M1012 'Settee'.
F1011 //He's young, hen. [laugh]//
M1013 //He's better off [inaudible] 'the settee', oh aye, mair posh.//
F1054 //[inaudible]// Mmhm eh 'running water smaller than a river'?
F1011 A 'burn'.
M1010 Just a 'burn'.
M1013 A 'trickle'.
M1012 A 'burn'.
F1054 An is 'a trickle' quite a common word or is that
M1013 'Trickle' oh it's no a bad common word, it's no a bad word. I mean some o them burns when they're dried up are just trickly //aye, a [?]gerbil[/?], aye//
M1012 //or a [?]gerbil[/?] a [?]gerbil[/?].//
M1010 //[?]gerbil[/?].//
M1012 'the [inaudible] [?]gerbilled[/?] fae the felk an ne'er its rise regained', is a quote fae a Hawick song
M1013 //[?]'Gerbil'[/?] then.//
F1054 //That's nice, yeah.// Also like like the animal gerbil?
M1012 //No it's a different word it's eh an you an you could pour//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1012 pourin tei would ye could get a [?]gerbil[/?] o tei //when ye pour oot just aye it's a dribble mair than a, aye, a [?]gerbil[/?] it's maybe a//
F1011 //Uh-huh.//
M1013 //Dribble, aye, dribble, aye.//
F1054 //Dribble, I guess.//
M1012 metathesis o if that's the right word, o 'dribble'.
F1054 Great ehm I think we've done all that one, splendid, 'What you call them', start wi 'mum, mother'.
M1012 Mm aye, 'mother, maw, mither'.
M1013 Ma maw. //Ma 'maw, ma 'maw'.//
M1010 //Aye, ma 'maw'.//
F1011 //'Mom'.//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1054 //An would ye say it, not, are you sayin 'my mum' or are you sayin// //'mama' cause I can't//
M1010 //Aye, maw.//
M1013 //Hey maw [laugh].// //my maw, mmhm.//
M1010 //Just got tae say 'my maw',// //ken.//
M1013 //Hey ma, aye, hey ma.//
F1054 Okay, 'grandmother'.
M1010 //'Granny'//
F1011 //'Granny'.//
M1010 //'Granny'//
M1013 //'Granny, granny'.// //'Granny, granny', is it, aye.//
M1012 //'Granny, granny'.//
F1054 //That's unanimous isn't it, 'male partner'?//
M1012 'My man'.
M1010 //'My man' [inaudible].//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1013 //'My man', aye, I like that.// //'My man'. [laugh]//
M1010 //Aye, eh// //[inaudible] man//
F1054 //An what aboot if ye werena mairried// //would it still be your man?//
M1012 //Still be your 'man'.//
M1010 //Well// //Aye it still it still be your man but nowadays they yaise the word 'pairtner',//
M1012 //Aye.//
F1011 //Mmhm.// //Aye it's just//
M1012 //'Bidie-in'.//
M1010 //ken? They yaise the word 'pairtner',// //[inaudible]//
M1012 //But 'bidie-in' would eh//
M1010 Aye. //Aye.//
M1012 //Mmhm.//
F1054 //It's a common one nooadays, isn't it?// Ehm female partner?
M1013 I haven't got one but it's 'the boss'. //[laugh]//
M1012 //[laugh]//
M1010 //[laugh] Aye, aye.//
F1011 //Just the wife. [laugh]//
F1054 //Or a 'pest'.//
M1012 //Aye, wum-//
M1010 //Just your 'wife' just, aye.//
M1012 ma 'wumman', just sayin the opposite o 'man'.
M1010 Aye.
M1012 Says 'wumman', ye ye wouldnae //talk aboot your 'wumman' but you might speak aboot somebody else's 'wumman'.//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1012 //That's it's that's she's his wumman.//
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 //I he-// //I hear the lads sayin 'her that must be obeyed' so that's the boss.//
F1011 //Aye.//
M1012 //[laugh]//
M1013 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh] What aboot ehm 'friend'?//
F1011 Just a 'freend'.
M1012 //Mmhm.//
M1010 //Just a 'freend'.//
M1013 //A 'pal'.//
M1012 'Freend'
M1010 //Aye.//
M1013 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //Iit's funny cause I was just in Glasgow the other day an they were sayin, 'pal, buddy, chum, mate',// //they had loads but it's just mair 'freend' here.//
M1012 //They're they're mair English maist o them,//
M1010 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //That's right, that's right, aye.// //[inaudible]//
M1012 //specifically Hawick would be 'freend' which which is a variant o English 'friend' but// //'chum' and 'mate' are universal.//
M1013 //Mmhm.// //Aye.//
M1012 //'Freend'.//
F1054 //But you you tend if ye were [inaudible] speakin about goin out with someone you knew, it's your 'freend', mmhm okay.// //'grandfather', any o you a gran-//
M1012 //Mm.//
M1010 //Aye I'm a grandfaither, I'd just 'grandfaither', just// //just 'grandfather'.//
M1012 //Aye, I'm, I'm a grandfaither an aw, 'grandfaither'//
F1011 //Mmhm 'grandpa'//
M1013 //'Pop'.//
M1012 //Aye, aye just eight months, [laugh] thank you.//
M1010 //Aye, aye.//
F1011 //[laugh] Oh but just recent. [laugh]//
F1054 //You dinnae look auld enough Ian at all [laugh] oh congratulations.// Word for 'something whose name you've forgotten'.
M1012 //'Thingummy', 'thingummy' or a or a 'whatdiveecait'.//
M1010 //Aye [inaudible]//
F1011 //'Thingummy' [inaudible].//
M1012 //'Where's my whatdiveecait, my thingummy'?//
M1013 //'Yon thing'.// 'I'm lookin for yon thing' [laugh]
F1011 Just 'thingummy'.
M1010 Aye 'thingabe', aye. //Aye.//
F1011 //As ye get aulder ye use that a lot mair.// //Thingabe, thingabe, thingabe.//
M1010 //Aye, a-a- aifter yer mind's gone blank// //Aye.//
F1011 //Oh thingabe. [laugh]//
M1013 //[inaudible] thingabe.//
F1054 //That's a good one, is it 'thingabe', or 'me'?// //[inaudible]//
M1012 //Kinda interchangeable, 'thingame' or 'be', M. or B.//
F1011 //Aye 'thingabe'.// //'Thingamy' [inaudible]//
M1012 //'Thingabe, thingame, thingame, thingabe'//
F1054 'A kit of tools'
M1012 //Mm mm.//
F1011 //'Tuil box'// 'Tuil box' is was in the poem there. //A faither's tuil box mmhm//
M1012 //Mmhm 'tuil box'.//
F1054 Same?
M1010 Eh a 'bass', a 'bass', eh a a bass was a a very strong hardened bag wi twae handles on it, an it opened oot like a sorta half circle, an ye pit yer tools intae it, yer saws, for joine- I'm I'm talkin aboot joiners, an plumbers an aw an ye pit them in an then ye pit the hammer throw the tap the pit the hammer heid throw the handles then ye cairied it like that tae yer job. //I mean at yin time, ower yer shouder, aye, an at yin time//
F1011 //Ower yer shouder?//
M1010 eh they had bi- muckle big barras an they pit their slates ontae it their ledders ontae it an aw their different things, an I can mind my pal sayin tae mei yin day when he was an apprentice eh eh plumber ye ken, 'I had tae push somethin up the loan the day', he says, 'On ma', oh sorry, 'On on ma eh on ma barrae', he says, 'Ledders an an slates an aw sorts o things', he says up tae where I was workin, up tae the job where I was workin', ye ken?
F1054 Are you a plumber then?
M1010 No I'm not a plumber, no. //No.//
F1054 //[inaudible] this is,// //Ian did you have anything tae add tae that?//
M1012 //No it's//
M1013 //No no.// //Other word I've heard eh artists//
M1012 //'tuil'.// //Mm.//
M1013 //say a canvas they used tae put aw their tools in a in a canvas,// ye know? //There ye go.//
M1012 //Mm mm.//
M1010 //A bass.//
F1054 //That's the first words I've heard for tool box apart from tool box, ehm a bass, interestin, yeah.// //Sorry, okay.//
M1013 //Ye learn something every day.//
F1054 Pinchin a bit o paper, ehm 'tools' okay, 'young person in cheap trendy clothes an jewellery'.
M1013 A 'ted'. //[laugh]//
M1012 //[laugh]//
F1011 I would hae said 'trashy'.
M1010 'Hey look at her she's dressed tae kill'.
M1012 //[laugh]//
M1013 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh] It's a good thing for you Dave, is it?// //[laugh]//
M1012 //So oo're veerin towards 'mutton dressed as lamb' there are we? [laugh]//
M1010 //[laugh]//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1012 //Mm, nothin special..//
M1013 //A 'ted' aye.//
F1054 //[inaudible] 'ted', tell me aboot that, Bert.//
M1012 //Mm.//
F1011 //Teddy boys.//
M1013 //Well 'teds' are eh 'teds' used tae be 'teddy boys' I mean maybe before your age, like// but they aw used tae be big boots an big jackets an an their the ladies they they were just the same they had swingin beads an eh an oh the an aw the gear like but we used tae ca them 'teds', 'teddy boys', 'teds' but eh there was, there was yin o them used tae be on the television, used tae used tae come on wi a big long tie an a the rest o it, //they were kinda teds, they kin-, you'll have seen them have ye on the television?//
M1012 //Francie an Josie were kinda like that, aye, uh-huh uh-huh uh-huh.//
M1010 //Francie an Josie [inaudible]//
F1011 //'Teddy boys', mm yes, aye.//
M1013 //They were kinda that way teds, aye, great, teddy boys.// //[inaudible]//
M1010 //Aye, aye, the D., the D.A.//
F1011 //Remember the, the haircuts they used tae have an what was it caed the duck's// //the D., anatomy. [laugh]//
M1010 //the duck's a- anatomy or the D.A.// //Aye, aye, yeah.//
F1011 //Aye the D.A., duck's anatomy, swept back at the [laugh]//
M1013 //Aye.//
F1054 What about today if you saw somebody walkin alang wi cheap trendy clothes the day, what would ye ca them?
M1013 [laugh] Seen yin seen yin the other night, I'm no kiddin I was sayin there an they had stockings wi, the lassies especially had stockings wi aw different colours an they had eh earrings an //course ye ke- nowadays ye ken they have//
M1012 //Mm.//
M1013 rings in their noses an rings in their ears an oh my good- wondered what I was seein. [inaudible]
F1054 Ian you must hear more words aroon the school aboot things like that, what do you hear young folk usin today? //Aye.//
M1012 //In a sorta derogatory fashion tae// ah well, [exhale], just 'tramp' an 'cow' an eh, naethin specifically Hawick I dinnae think.
M1013 //No.//
F1054 //Mmhm okay that's fine ehm,// 'baby'. //Madge, ladies first.//
F1011 //'Bairn'.//
M1010 Just a bairn, aye.
M1013 A wean.
M1012 //Wean's mair west o Scotland though [inaudible] Hawick we would say 'bairn' raither than 'wean' I would think.//
M1010 //Aye.// //Aye, aye.//
M1013 //Aye.// //[inaudible]//
M1012 //Mm uh-huh.//
M1010 //Aye, aye.//
F1054 //Wean's apparently got oh [inaudible] from Glasgow thought it might have Gaelic or I- no, Irish, Irish.//
M1012 It'll come frae 'wee one' will it, originally? Wee wee wee yin //'wean'.//
M1013 //Oor wean's the most wonderful wean e'er he saw// it would take me a long long time tae tell aw //[laugh]//
F1054 //Is that a saying in//
M1013 No it's a wee poem like //just a wee poem.//
F1054 //Do you want to tell us the rest o it?//
M1013 Oh well I I'd be tellin a lie if I was tae try tae mind it aw but I've heard it ye ken but I I I just dinnae ken it aw aff, no, no, no.
F1054 Do you want tae give us as much as ye can mind, Bert?
M1013 'Oor wean is the most wonderful wean e'er he saw, it would take me a long long time tae tell aw, he lies an he kicks between faither an me' //I I I I dinnae I honestly dinnae ken.//
M1012 //Mm good.//
F1054 //That's good [inaudible].// //Ian do you want tae get your pen?//
M1012 //[inaudible] ta//
F1054 Ehm let's see what have we got noo, 'mither', 'grandmither' we've done, 'male partner' we've done 'grandfaither', 'freend', 'baby', 'female partner', 'kit of tools', yeah I think we've done aa that. //Splendid we're makin good progress, ehm 'clothes',//
M1013 //Mmhm.//
M1012 //'Clothes'.//
F1054 //words for that.// //'Clothes'//
M1010 //For what? 'Claes'.//
M1013 //Mm.// //Well,//
M1010 //'Claes'.//
F1011 //'Claes'.//
M1013 it's a a naval thing, be- 'get yer gear on', 'get yer gear on', aye. //'Claes' aye, no Hawick, aye.//
M1012 //'Claes'.//
F1011 //Mm.//
F1054 //[inaudible] 'trousers'.//
M1012 //'Breeks'.//
F1011 //Mm 'breeks' or 'troosers'.//
M1013 //'Breeks'// //'Breeks, breeks'.//
M1010 //'Breeks'.// //'Breeks' or 'troosers', aye.//
F1054 //Yeah I'd say 'breeks' too.// 'Children's soft shoes worn for P.E.'?
M1012 //Just 'sandshoes'.//
F1011 //'Sandshoes' or 'plimsolls'.//
M1013 //'Sandshoes'.// //I put 'sandshoes'.//
M1010 //Aye, 'sandshoes'.//
F1054 //Good.// //Right well gosh that's us gotten round them very very quickly indeed.//
M1013 //Very good yeah.//
F1054 Now tell me aboot ither words fae Hawick that ye're fond of or keen tae share.
M1013 'Amerso'. //'a- amerso' it means I am.//
M1012 //Aye [inaudible] aye, aye.//
F1011 //'Amerso'. [laugh]// //I'll tell you I was I was I was in the habit o sayin that when I started work as a fourteen year old an apprentice,//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //Aye.//
F1011 in in an office in Hawick, and ehm I used tae answer by sayin, 'I a- amerso' an they used tae tell me that that wasnae the way tae speak at aw, so the every time I said 'amerso' they aw said 'ameeeee', //an by gosh I broke the habit. [laugh]//
M1010 //[laugh]// //Aye.//
F1054 //What does that mean?//
F1011 'I am so'.
M1013 'I am'.
F1011 'Amer', //'amerso'.//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
F1011 //It's very common in Hawick that isn't it, 'amer'.//
M1013 //Oh aye.//
M1010 //Ah.//
F1054 //Would you still use that Madge?//
F1011 //Well it is, aye.//
M1013 //Oh some folk still use it.// //Oh aye, 'amerso', aye.//
F1011 //'Amerso', aye.//
F1054 //'Amerso'.//
M1012 Go- it's eh George Shankey made up this book caed 'Speak Teri', now Teri's a, the name for a re- a somebody born in Hawick is a 'Teri', it comes frae the the town motto which is 'Teribus y Teriodin', which is either a prayer to the Norse gods Thor an Odin, or frae the ancient Welsh language meanin 'land of victory, land of defence'. So Teribus is oor main common ridin song, the main song aboot Hawick and Hawick folk are referred tae as 'Teris', so this is a publication caed 'Speak Teri' which gave aw sorts o Hawick phrases ehm so on the followin up frae 'amerso' there's a wee section there 'whae's hei then, ye ken him I dev not, ye dev so, I'm no shuir.' //So the, 'whae's hei then?', 'who is he then?'//
F1054 //So tell us what aw that means.//
M1012 'Ye ken him', 'you know him'. 'I dev not', 'I do not'. 'Ye dev so', 'I'm sure you do'. 'I'm no shuir', 'I'm not certain'. So we've got lots of phrases that are actually twae or three words that we rin thegither intae yin, //'amerso' bein yin o them.//
F1054 //Can you just count for me in Hawick?//
M1012 Yin, twae, threi, fower, five, six, seeven, eight, nine, ten, eleeven, twal, twenty.
M1013 Twent- aye, aye, aye.
M1012 Seeventy, eighty, a hunder, twae hunder, threi hunder, fower hunder, a thoosand, //that's [inaudible]//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
F1011 Can spell Egypt, E.G.Y.P.T. //[laugh]//
M1010 //Aye, aye.//
M1013 //That's right.//
F1054 //Is that really how you'd spell it?//
M1012 //Aye.//
F1011 //E.G.Y.P.T.// //[laugh]//
M1012 //And there's 'Hai the kei wei?', that means 'Do you, do you have the key in your possession?', which in Hawick becomes, 'Hai the kei wei?'//
M1010 //[laugh]//
M1012 //Mmhm.//
M1013 //That's good, yeah, eh yes, uh-huh uh-huh uh-huh.//
F1054 //Do, you do run a lot o words together now.//
M1010 Eh, yeah, a word that comes tae my mind, eh oo used tae ca I used tae ken an auld woman eh caed Marion Gilchrist now Marion's name among us yins was she was Mairn, she wasnae Marion, she was Mairn, that's what they caed her. Now there's families in Hawick that are caed Little but when oo speak aboot them oo ca them Leitle.
M1013 That's right.
M1010 An there's other families in Hawick caed Turnbull, //an when oo speak aboot them oo ca them Trummell.//
M1013 //Trummell.//
F1054 Could there be a reason for makin things, runnin things together for speed or
F1011 It's
M1012 //[laugh]//
M1010 //[laugh]//
M1013 //Short hand. [laugh]//
M1012 Do oo said just thinkin back eh 'ill', oo oo'd say m- 'bad' for 'ill', 'her man's bad', meanin he's ill, doesnae mean he's //no.//
F1011 //He's a bad man mmhm.//
M1012 An oo'd say 'I'd be bad for' daein somethin. 'What way are ye ga- gaun?', 'I'd be bad for gaun that way', there's naethin bad aboot it. Oo say 'awfu' in that context an aw, 'Somebody's an awfu man for the rugby, an awfu man for the golf', there's naethin awfu in the English usage aboot that. We use that, we talk aboot 'the rugby' an 'the golf', we get 'the cauld', oo gaun along 'the street', oo've got 'the crescent', //we use 'the' a lot, as oo get aulder, oo get the pains.//
F1011 //Mmhm. [laugh]// //Endorsed. [laugh]//
M1013 //Oo say, oo say, 'She's no guid, she's awfu guid'.// //[laugh]//
F1011 //[laugh] No really. [laugh]//
F1054 //Is that true Madge?//
M1010 //I cannae think o I cannae think o onything else.//
M1013 //[inaudible]//
M1010 Eh I've heard my faither sayin aboot a [?]tow's whisp[/?] It's it's it's like a [?]tow's whisp[/?]. Now I'm no just ower shuir just what the meanin what the meanin o that that was eh but I've heard, 'Oh, that's like a [?]tow's whisp[/?]', I I I would say it would maybe be somebody wi a lot o hair an they were daein this wi it ye ken an they were aw //rufflin it up just ye ken like a [?]tow's whisp[/?] ye ken//
F1054 //Rufflin it.//
M1010 Ah, I I cannae think o
M1012 I've got a couple o frae the textile trade you were askin aboot that before, no yaised now possibly but 'five ell o wind' was 'tae go very quickly', know an ell was a was a measure in the tweed trade, an 'aw by like a press off' //meanin 'it happens very quickly', an aw, a press off//
F1011 //Mm.//
M1013 //Aye.// //I've had lots o them, I used tae work a hand knit machine,//
M1012 //is a no- off the machine, uh-huh.//
M1010 //[laugh]//
F1011 //Off the machine isn't it, the stitches come off, it's mm exa- [laugh]// //[inaudible]//
M1012 //Aye.//
M1013 //an ye got a press off an aw the weights used tae come doon tae the flair,// //uh-huh tae the flair aye, not the floor mind, the flair.//
F1011 //[inaudible]// Mm, I was in New Zealand a number o years ago, my dad took me out there an when we were when we were comin home before we came home we were on a bus journey up tae Auckland for a flight ye see an we were in this hotel one night, an my dad was just along the corridor frae me an I could see he was havin difficulty gettin intae his room an there was a young manager comin along, an I heard my dad say, 'This kei winna wurk', //an the young manager looked at us as much tae say, 'You don't look Chinese', [laugh] cause in Hawick we talk aboot//
M1012 //[laugh]//
M1010 //[laugh] aye//
M1013 //[laugh]//
F1011 eh 'yow' an 'mei', //which really in print it looks like Chinese, doesn't it? [laugh] 'Yow' an 'mei'.//
M1013 //That's right [inaudible] we say,// //'Has ony o ye ony oni?', that means, 'Have you got a match or a or a//
M1012 //Aye.//
F1011 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
M1013 //cigarette?', 'ony o ye ony on ye?'//
F1054 What's an 'ony oy'?
M1013 'Ony'.
M1012 //'Ony''s 'would any of you, do any of you happen to have any in your possession?'//
F1011 //'On you'.// //[laugh]//
M1012 //becomes, 'has ony ony ony ony?'// //'Ha- has ony o ye ony on ye?'//
M1010 //[laugh]//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 //That's right.//
F1054 //[laugh] Say that again.// //Aye, ye'd pat yer pockets or somethin at the time I think, wouldn't you?//
M1012 //Aye.// //Has ony o ye ony on ye?//
M1013 //The the the story that I got wi that was there's there's some gaun up tae the train up to Carlisle,//
F1054 //[inaudible]//
M1013 an this fella's goin [inaudible] an he goes, //'Has ony o ye ony on ye?' he's lookin for a match ye see tae light his pipe [laugh] 'Ony o ye ony on ye?'//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1012 I mean know ye said, Bert said, 'Up tae Carlisle', now that defies aw the rules o geography, but oo gaun up tae Carlisle, oo gaun doon tae Jedart, //we've got different, doon tae Berwick, oo've got different words for each o the places oo're gaun tae//
F1011 //Oo gaun doon tae Berwick.//
M1012 oo gaun intae Edinburgh, oo gaun throw tae Glesgae, oo gaun ower tae Gala, different, different words, but 'up' is because o the railway, climbed up oot o Hawick up ower the Limekiln Edge an the train as it was climin up says, 'I think I can, I think I can, I think I can, I think I can', an then when it got ower the top it said, 'I kent I could, I kent I could, I kent I could, I kent I could'.
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 //[laugh]//
F1054 What aboot names for the places aroond aboot here? //Ehm ye know for ither Borders toons.//
M1012 //Well the, the// the yin which maist folk wouldnae pick up on is 'The Holm' for Newcastleton, H.O.L.M. which is a low-lyin bi- eh beside the river where Newcastleton's situated, but The Holm I would, a teacher came here an he he'd been here months an he said, 'It it must be a very big orphanage at Newcastleton', //an he thought that aw the bairns fae Newcastleton were in a home,//
M1013 //[laugh]// //[laugh]//
M1012 //but they c- the- they just came frae 'The Holm'//
M1010 //[laugh]// //That's right, aye.//
M1012 //which is oor name for it or Cop- Copshaw, Copsh- Copshie,// for Newcastleton because Newcastleton was a planned village by the Duke o Buccleuch, new village seventeen ninety-three, it's on a grid-iron pattern like New York, Newcastleton, New York, very similar, an ehm the yin o the fairms that Newcastleton was built on was the farm of Copshaw Holm, an so the Newcastletons are still referred tae as 'the Copshie yins' or 'the Holm yins'.
F1054 What aboot eh Jedburgh?
M1012 That's Jeddart.
M1010 [inaudible]
F1054 What aboot ither places, Galashiels //[inaudible]//
M1012 //Gala's just the same eh Langholm's 'The Muckle Toon',// //Kels- Kelsey, Denholm's just Denholm, Kelsey rather than Kelso.//
F1054 //Ehm [inaudible] mmhm.// //Now, mm.//
M1013 //Souters o Selkirk, Selkirk gets caed the Souters, Souter Land.// //Souter Land's Kelso, eh Selkirk.//
F1054 //Mmhm.// What aboot ither industries here, fairmin term- terminology or wh- what industries did ye work in, can ye tell me what words ye used there? //[inaudible]//
M1010 //Just in e- in the in the the eh// the tweed mills ye just ca it ye workit in the tweeds or ye workit in the hosiery. That was aw that ye thingummy, an at yin timeeh there yaised tae be eh mill whistles gaun an a whistle went at eight o'clock tae wairn ye tae get in for eight o'clock, an then it went at half-past twal an then it went again at half-past yin. Blenkies, which was Blenkhorn Richardson's, they had a five an twenty-past yin whistle, an it went at five an twenty past, an then eh mill whistles went at night again, that has aw been stopped. I think it was actually stopped durin the war because o eh the sirens we had for ye ken air raid warnins I think, I might be wrang when I say that but I I think it'd be stopped be stopped by then it. An I can mind when I was an apprentice eh just after the war I used tae g- if I was runnin doon the road 'Oh Heavens, I'm late!', doon the road like the blazes ye ken eh tae get tae yer work for eight o'clock, //ken?//
F1011 //Every mill whistle had its ain soond.// //Mmhm the workers knew the the soond frae the mill they work at.//
M1010 //Aye, aye, aye.//
M1013 //That's right.// //Referrin back tae what Madge was sayin aboot her her faither when he couldnae open the door,//
F1011 //Mmhm.//
M1013 wi Chinese is there's anither yin in Hawick, 'yow'll pull mei an I'll pull yow' [laugh] [inaudible] //[laugh] 'an an I'll pull yow', aye, 'yow'll pull mei an I'll pull yow',//
F1011 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //You'll pull me an?//
M1012 //[inaudible]//
M1010 //Aye, [inaudible].//
M1013 //[laugh]//
M1012 It's if somebody was askin for, met somebody in the street an was askin after their welfare, said 'How are ye the day?' they'd quite often get the answer, 'Ee sei it aw',
M1013 //Uh-huh.//
F1054 //'As you see'?//
M1012 meanin, 'Ee sei it aw', means 'ye can see by lookin at us'.
F1011 //'You can see it all'. [laugh]//
F1054 //Yeah, that's a good one.// I mean er tae whit extent are you guys language buffs, aficionados that's kinda keepin things up, and tae whit extent are you representative o general talkin like [inaudible].
M1012 Well I'm I'm sorta keep keep it up but no [inaudible] //subconsciously we wanted tae, aye.//
F1011 //We're older and eh ye know, but of course as I said before that//
M1013 //That's right, uh-huh.//
F1011 //there's a lot o people come intae the area//
F1054 //Mmhm.//
F1011 and eh ye know I I can hear things I mean I he- I heard my grandsons talkin aboot 'eyes', //oo oo spoke aboot 'een' no 'eyes', it's aye it's changin.//
M1012 //It's changin and what annoys me is the//
M1010 //'Een', aye, aye.//
M1012 infiltration o the Glesgae 'youse'. //'Can I help youse?', that was never there but that's comin in now for some reason,//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1013 //Oh aye, you- youse ones.// //'Youse ones', that's Glasgow aye, we say 'Yow yins', aye.//
M1012 //aye, oo say 'yow yins', the the peculiar badge o the Hawick tongue is the 'yow' an 'mei',//
F1011 //Mmhm mmhm that's right.//
M1012 they're originally frae the Dutch ehm but oo say 'yow' for 'you' an 'mei' an when somebody was askin at Waverley Station, they just had tae say tae a porter at Waverley Station, 'Can ye tell mei?' //an the porter would immediately say, 'Platform two for the Hawick train'.//
M1010 //[laugh]//
F1011 //That's true [laugh] that's true.//
M1013 //That's right, that's true, aye that's right, aye, oh it's//
F1054 //An how do you feel aboot your language?//
M1012 //[inaudible] aye//
F1011 //Aye, it's//
M1013 //Oh hope oo don't lose it, no I hope no, hope, it's great.//
M1012 //I uise it a the time I uise it when I'm speakin, I uise it when I'm teachin, I uise it when I'm speakin//
F1011 //uh-huh.//
M1012 in a public, I I dae a fair bit o after-dinner speakin, I speak in Hawick I'm I I dae a lecture on the Hawick tongue, [inaudible] that's my Hawick vocabulary book that I'm lookin at there just as I mind words I write them doon an ehm I'm consciously tryin tae keep it alive but it is gettin seriously diluted an lost.
F1054 Were you [cough] brought up at school tae speak any ither wey? //[inaudible], mm.//
M1010 //Ye had tae speak English.//
F1011 //Oh you had tae speak English in school, we had tae speak English in school but then//
M1013 //Aye, speak prop- that's right.// //Mm.//
F1011 //I mean we didn't travel very far in those days so// //ehm the the the the the dialect was kept, wasn't it really, aye, aye.//
M1013 //That's right.//
M1010 In the winter time when oo was at the scuil if ye saw lookin oot the windae an ye saw the snaw ye would sit an say //'Snaw snaw come away, let us have a holiday', an ye gey often got a half a day, they sent ye hame,//
F1011 //Uh-huh.//
M1010 ken? An oo uised tae gaun sle-, oo uised tae gaun sledgin, //an ye pit aw yer sledges thegither wi the ropes aw intermi- in- intermingled wi each other an oo caed it a [?]yokatolly[/?],//
F1011 //mmhm//
M1010 //caed it a [?]yokatolly[/?].//
M1013 //A [inaudible] aye.//
F1054 //What's that?//
M1010 Just aw the sledges thegither, an it went doon ye went ye went doon in a in a a heap ye ken ye her sledge would be in front o mine an her her ropes would be tied tae mine an somebody, an ye'd maybe have aboot a dozen sledges aw in a raw, an everybody sat on't an ye had somebody at the front guidin ye an doon the hill ye went wi this wi wi the wi the aw the sledges, //a [?]yokatolly[/?].//
M1012 //That that's a peculiarly Hawick word,// //[?]yokatolly[/?] is is Hawick if ye it it's it's it comes frae//
F1054 //A yoke of something [inaudible].// //[cough]//
M1012 //cairts bein yoked together tae gaun throw a toll bar,// they would, they didnae need tae pay as much if they were tied thegither. an that has come intae sledgin it's caed a [?]yokatolly[/?], an even in Selkirk they dinnae, if Selkirk folk ca a [?]yokatolly[/?] a [?]ticky[/?], for the reason for that I'm no shuir but [?]yokatolly[/?] is peculiarly Hawick. Soonds Japanese but it's peculiarly Hawick.
F1054 Mmhm. Ehm and so do you kinda feel bilingual then?
M1012 //Uh-huh.//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 //We have tae be, we have tae be when we go tae the town like, if ye speak some o the// the words that we we use here day an daily some o them wouldnae understand, 'What d'you say, eh, eh?', //ken?//
F1054 //Whaur do you use this words an whaur do you use English?//
M1013 Oh when when ye gaun oot, well, like I say, if ye're eh if ye're oot the toon ye speak English or ye try tae speak English like but it's no always, but they ken the way we speak thick, they say aye you're Scotch I could I can tell by the way the tone o your voice, I can tell.
M1012 As I say I I try an speak the same tae everybody ehm ye automatically refine in certain situations, ehm but I I would be sellin my birthright for a mess o pottage if I if I spoke properly an //put it on. Just//
F1054 //What does what did you say? 'I'd be sellin'//
M1012 it's my birthright for a mess of pottage, it's a biblical term tae do wi Jacob an Esau in't it? think it is, ehm that it would be no if I ever if I ever heard mysel pit it on I would be annoyed wi mysel. //So I just try tae, just be yoursel.//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 //That's right.// //Be yourself, I mean//
M1013 //That's the right thing to do, be yourself.//
F1011 there's Hawick folk throughout the world an of course they have tae speak English tae make themselves understood but if ye're visitin foreign parts an ye come up against a Hawick person they they can bring the lingo back again, just speak broad Hawick. //An they they just they fair enjoy that an ye find them comin back at the Common Ridin,//
M1010 //Aye.//
F1011 and eh they they fair enjoy just speakin Hawick again really. But I often say that ye ken Hawick folk they're they're all over the place if ye ever get lost throughout the world ye- I think ye should just stand on a street corner an whistle 'Teribus' //an they would come oot the woodwork [laugh] an I think we should have the first verse o 'Teribus' [inaudible] Bert.//
M1012 //[inaudible] Bert [inaudible] I was gaun tae say Bert should sing,//
M1010 //aye, aye//
M1013 //Aye that's right.// //Uh-huh.//
M1012 //sing oo somethin oo, I was thinkin oo could dae Pawkie Paiterson which would be guid eh// for the, I mean dae 'Teribus' the first verse the now but maybe //if Bert sung Pawkie Paiterson it's a guid dialect song.//
F1011 //Aye that's right.//
M1013 //Uh-huh uh-huh.// //'Scotia felt thine ire, o Odin, on the bloody field of Flodden,//
F1011 //[inaudible]//
M1013 where our fathers fell with honour round their king and country's banner, //Teribus ye Teri Odin, sons of heroes slain at Flodden,//
M1012 //Teribus ye Teri Odin, sons of heroes slain at Flodden,//
M1010 //Teribus ye Teri Odin, sons of heroes slain at Flodden,//
F1011 //Teribus ye Teri Odin, sons of heroes slain at Flodden,// //imitating Border bowmen, aye defend your rights and common.//
M1012 //imitating Border bowmen, aye defend your rights and common.//
M1010 //imitating Border bowmen, aye defend your rights and common.//
M1013 //imitating Border bowmen, aye defend your rights and common.//
M1012 Dae the first verse o the auld song, //cause that's mair the Hawick tongue.//
M1013 //Auld song, uh-huh.// We'll a' hie to the muir a-riding, Drumlanrig gave it for providing oor ancestors of martial order, to drive the English off oor Border, //up wi' Hawick, its rights and common, up wi' a' the Border bowmen!//
M1012 //up wi' Hawick, its rights and common, up wi' a' the Border bowmen!//
M1010 //up wi' Hawick, its rights and common, up wi' a' the Border bowmen!// //Teribus and Teriodin, we are up to guard the common.//
M1012 //Teribus and Teriodin, we are up to guard the common.//
M1013 //Teribus and Teriodin, we are up to guard the common'.// //There's a lot o voice, a lot o verses for//
M1012 //Dae a bit o 'Pawkie Paiterson'.//
F1054 //Lovely.//
M1013 'As aw was gaun up Hawick Loan yeh Monanday at morn, I heard a puir auld grey meer gie mony a heavy groan, gie mony a heavy groan, sir, an this she says tae mei, //'I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei'.//
M1012 //'I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei'.//
M1010 //'I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei'.//
F1011 //'I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud sei how ye're guidin mei'.//
M1013 Shou- should tell you that this is a a horse makin its will, //ye see? It's a horse, this horse is makin its will because an this is eh//
M1012 //[laugh]//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 'And as for Peggy Duncan, she rises in the morn, And cries 'O Godsakes Uncle, the yaud's amang the corn', hei takes his muckle pleugh-staff an he comes and swabbles mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei.//
M1012 //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei.//
M1010 //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei.//
F1011 //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei.//
M1013 And as for the minister o' Wilton, his coat it has worn thin, and for tae keep him frae the cauld I'll leave him ma auld skin, wi hide and hair tae keep him warm as lang as it's dune mei, //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei'.//
M1012 //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei.//
M1010 //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei.//
F1011 //I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei.//
M1012 //Do the Peggy Duncan verse, it's 'gar her een sei strechter', that's a good one.//
M1013 //Oh aye that's right, aye.//
F1054 //[laugh]//
M1013 'And as for', //naw, Nellie Harkness, it is Ne-? 'And as for Nellie Harkness, she is'//
M1012 //[inaudible] Nellie Harkness is what I'm meanin, aye, no it's not it's,// er aye, 'she is a bonny lass', I'm gettin mixed up.
M1013 'And as for Nellie Harkness she is a bonnie lass, so I will leave her my een holes tae bei a keekin' gless, tae gar her een sei streichter for they often stand agley, I'm //Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei'.//
M1012 //Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei'.//
M1010 //Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei'.//
F1011 //Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei, I'm Pawkie Paiterson's auld grey yaud, sei how ye're guidin' mei'.//
M1012 //There ye are.//
F1054 //Beautiful.// //[inaudible] I might have tae get back tae ye on the words o that Bert, what it actually means, I thought I got the sense o it I thought.//
M1013 //Uh-huh oh aye uh-huh.//
M1012 //I've got eh somethin I made up aboot the Hawick tongue if ye want tae, so they'll join in wi the 'De say you say yow' bit//
F1054 //Okay yeah.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
M1013 //Uh-huh uh-huh.//
M1012 'Here in Hawick oor hame oo've lots to shout aboot, oo're queen o aa the Border o that there is nae doot, yin thing that makes oo special is oo speak in oor ain way, just listen for a meenit an you can dae it tae, oh //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei,//
M1010 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei,//
F1011 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei,//
M1013 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei,//
M1012 De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose and have a cup o tei'. The verse aboot weather conditions which oo've talked aboot. 'In the back end oo get nithered when the cauld winds start tae blaw, an oor feet they get fair platchin as oo slaisters throw the snaw, in the simmer oo get birsled oo get drookit bei autumn's rain, an then the wind turns snell yince mair an the winter comes again. //So de say you say yow man, de say me say mei,//
M1010 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei,//
F1011 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei,//
M1013 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei,// //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1012 //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1010 //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
F1011 //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1012 De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei. Oh yin that speaks an awfu lot, oo say that hei's a hash, an hard up means oo arenae weel an no just short o cash, Hawick women don't go shopping for the messages they gaun an they don't say, 'Meet my husband', they say, 'This is Jock, my man'. //Oh de say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei,//
M1010 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei,//
F1011 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei,//
M1013 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei,// //de say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1012 //de say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1010 //de say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
F1011 //de say you say yow man, de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1012 Aye here in Hawick oor hame oo've lots to shout aboot, oo're queen o aa the Border, o that there is nae doot, an the thing that makes oo special is oo speak in oor ain way, //an now that oo have learnt ee, ee can dae it tae,//
F1011 //[laugh]// //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei,//
M1012 //de say you say yow man, de say me say mei,//
M1010 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei,//
M1013 //De say you say yow man, de say me say mei,// //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei, de say you say yow man,//
M1012 //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei, de say you say yow man,//
M1010 //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei, de say you say yow man,//
F1011 //an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei, de say you say yow man,// //de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1012 //de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1010 //de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.//
M1013 //de say me say mei, an when ee can come ben the hoose an have a cup o tei.// //[inaudible] awfu good.//
M1012 //Great.//
M1010 //Very good.//
F1011 //[laugh]//
F1054 //[laugh] Oh that's a lovely one, eh I'll just go roond once more and ask your name,// //whaur ye come fae an hoo lang ye've been here.//
M1010 //Eh Dave,// Dave [CENSORED: surname] I come fae Hawick I've lived here aw my life, I'm seeventy-five year auld.
F1011 I'm Madge [CENSORED: surname], I've lived here aw my life, I'm a Teri, an I'm a [inaudible] an I'm seventy-six years old mm.
M1013 Bert [CENSORED: surname] an I've just tu- turned eighty, an I'm only halfway. [laugh]
M1012 Ian [CENSORED: surname] an I've been in Hawick hopefully no for aw my life, hopefully there's a wee bit mair still tae come.

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APA Style:

BBC Voices Recording: Hawick. 2021. In The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow. Retrieved January 2021, from http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=1430.

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"BBC Voices Recording: Hawick." The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech. Glasgow: University of Glasgow, 2021. Web. January 2021. http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=1430.

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The Scottish Corpus of Texts & Speech, s.v., "BBC Voices Recording: Hawick," accessed January 2021, http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/document/?documentid=1430.

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Information about Document 1430

BBC Voices Recording: Hawick

Audio

Audio audience

Adults (18+)
General public
Informed lay people
Specialists
For gender Mixed
Audience size 1000+

Audio awareness & spontaneity

Speaker awareness Aware
Degree of spontaneity Spontaneous
Special circumstances surrounding speech Spontaneous but discussing a list of words they had thought about previously.

Audio footage information

Year of recording 2004
Recording person id 1060
Size (min) 59
Size (mb) 226

Audio footage series/collection information

Part of series
Contained in BBC Voices Recordings - www.bbc.co.uk/voices

Audio medium

Radio/audio
Web (e.g. audio webcast)

Audio setting

Education
Journalism
Recording venue School Staff Room
Geographic location of speech Hawick

Audio relationship between recorder/interviewer and speakers

Not previously acquainted
Speakers knew each other Yes

Audio speaker relationships

Friend
Members of the same group e.g. schoolmates

Audio transcription information

Transcriber id 631
Year of transcription 2006
Year material recorded 2005
Word count 11536

Audio type

Conversation
General description Conversation centred around a pre-prepared list of words for discussion

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1010

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes
Scots Yes Yes Yes Yes At home

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1011
Gender Female
Decade of birth 1920
Educational attainment Shorthand qualification
Age left school 14
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Occupation Mill counting house app. / shorthand typist / secretary
Place of birth Hawick
Region of birth Roxburgh
Birthplace CSD dialect area Rox
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Hawick
Region of residence Roxburgh
Residence CSD dialect area Rox
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Maintenance in knitwear mill
Father's place of birth Edinburgh
Father's region of birth Edinburgh
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Edb
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Housewife and mother
Mother's place of birth Glasgow
Mother's region of birth Glasgow
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Gsw
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes When necessary
Scots Yes Yes Yes Yes Mainly local dialect

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1012
Gender Male
Decade of birth 1950
Educational attainment University
Age left school 18
Upbringing/religious beliefs Protestantism
Occupation History teacher
Place of birth Edinburgh
Region of birth Edinburgh
Birthplace CSD dialect area Edb
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Hawick
Region of residence Roxburgh
Residence CSD dialect area Rox
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Company secretary
Father's place of birth Hawick
Father's region of birth Roxburgh
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Rox
Mother's occupation Millworker
Mother's place of birth Hawick
Mother's region of birth Roxburgh
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Rox
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Languages

Language Speak Read Write Understand Circumstances
English Yes Yes Yes Yes Uses Scots and English interchangeably
Scots Yes Yes Yes Yes Uses Scots and English interchangeably

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1013
Gender Male
Decade of birth 1920
Age left school 14
Occupation Hand knitting machine operator
Place of birth Hawick
Region of birth Roxburgh
Birthplace CSD dialect area Rox
Country of birth Scotland
Place of residence Hawick
Region of residence Roxburgh
Residence CSD dialect area Rox
Country of residence Scotland
Father's occupation Fishmonger
Father's place of birth Hawick
Father's region of birth Roxburgh
Father's birthplace CSD dialect area Rox
Father's country of birth Scotland
Mother's occupation Weaver
Mother's place of birth Hawick
Mother's region of birth Roxburgh
Mother's birthplace CSD dialect area Rox
Mother's country of birth Scotland

Participant

Participant details

Participant id 1054

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